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who's your cooking idol? - Page 2

post #31 of 43

I am with @GeneMachine Pepin has been my mentor for much of my cooking career. Molly Stevens author of  All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking is also one of the finest culinary instructors today.

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Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #32 of 43

Agree, Pepin as well as John Besh and Alon Shaya. Not only only do their skills and creativity inspire me to be better, their humility gets my attention.

post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

 

One of my all time favorite scenes from a cooking show was a Top Chef Master's episode.  This was with folks like Jonathon Waxman, Rick Bayless and Hubert Keller competing.  One challenge involved preparing a meal using college dorm equipment - a hot plate, toaster oven and microwave.

 

Keller is, indeed, a genius - unless he has to figure out which buttons to push on the microwave!

 

mjb.

 

I love that episode too!  I thought Hubert Keller was very creative in managing his pasta and how he reheated it.  Grace under pressure.  Frankly, that's one thing I find interesting in watching Top Chef vs Top Chef Masters . . . there's less drama in Top Chef Masters.  They seem more confident and creative.  Some of the contestants in Top Chef go into complete and total melt down at the drop of a hat . . . although, they usually are out earlier in the season.

 

I don't know if I have an idol, but if I had to pick chefs to cook with and learn from I would choose Jacques Pepin, Eric Ripert, Thomas Keller, Daniel Boulud . . . however, if I was going to party with a chef, I definitely want to spend the evening with Anthony Bourdain (as long as I could stay on his good side).  Never a dull moment with that guy!

post #34 of 43
i have to go with jack pepin.fresh and simple!
post #35 of 43

For me, it's definitely between David Tanis, Daniel Boulus and Thomas Keller. Tanis has such a unique philosophy of food. He renounces haute cuisine and cooks extremely rustic, family style food, but does it so well that he's highly revered as an innovative chef (He was the chef at both the Chez Panisse restaurant and café for over twenty years). I love the ballsy attitude he has in his cookbooks. His first book actually included a recipe for heirloom tomatoes with sea salt. It's almost a slap in the face to haute chefs who are trying so hard to manipulate items into new shapes and textures, when the raw products taste better on their own. Although, I find him to be almost an extremist. I too take a minimalist approach to my food, adding only the ingredients that are necessary, but I am also a fan of artistic plating and multi-course meals. Although I admit I can't stand overly 'molecular' recipes, I really enjoy the cuisines of chefs such as Keller and Boulud. The way they take recipes that are traditional rustic French and elevate them to be incredibly elegant without sacrificing the comfort-food feel is just wonderful.

post #36 of 43

I agree with Nicko about Molly Stevens. Her books on braising and roasting are terrific. Her roast chicken recipe is my go-to now.  She is not as well-known as she should be.

post #37 of 43

Sara Moulton

No nonsense 

To the point

Paved the way for many female chefs

Humble

Real

post #38 of 43

I'm going with Action Bronson.

post #39 of 43

I see a lot of names I don't recognize and I'm going to enjoy looking them up.  I already have Molly Steven's chicken recipe filed and ready for next time I roast a bird :)

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #40 of 43

I don't really have an idol. There's such a large number of splendid cooks in my own country and from all over Europe that I wouldn't know who to pick. I have cookbooks in a number of different languages, I follow TV shows on different European channels in different languages. It's impossible to choose. One thing is sure; I hate over-exposure when it comes to cooking shows. Our one and only cooking channel has obviously bought dozens of programs made by Jamie Oliver. I liked the guy and his cooking but since a few months he's boring me to death! Over-exposure and more of the same each day... no! Same thing is now happening with Rick Stein. If I had to pick one chef, it would have been no-nonsense Rick Stein and his clumsyness.

post #41 of 43

Jacques Pepin, Marcos Pierre White, All the pastry chefs who helped pastry being what it is today, my grandfather whose I've never met and could only taste his food through the stories my mother tells me.

post #42 of 43

I also like Marco Pierre.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #43 of 43

I'm inclined to say Anthony Bourdain. He has some great humility, great sense of food and most importantly a great appretiation for the pure enjoyment of all kinds of food! 

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