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Large capacity boiling

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I've been researching a solution for my kitchen and decided to get input from the rest of the cooking world.

 

There's a product I make a lot of. 80-200lbs per day. It needs to come to a simmer fast and only for about 10 minutes. Then I need a fast recovery time for the next batch. I've been working in batches of 20lbs. But that's just because it's the limit of my current setup, an outdoor turkey fryer burner with a 32 qt stockpot. On the outdoor rig it takes maybe 10 minutes initially and 5 minutes to recover between batches.

 

I'd like to do this in the kitchen instead of outside, but the issue I'm having with the stovetop is it takes way longer to get the cooking liquid to reach a simmer. I think my outdoor burner is like 130,000 btu. 

 

Ask me anything if this is not clear. Thanks!

post #2 of 8

>>recovery time
the laws of thermodynamics apply.


once a pot of water is boiling / simmering, left on the same burner, the recovery time depends on the temperature and the mass of the 'stuff' dumped in and the heat transfer rate of the boiling/simmering water to the "mass"

same pot, etc etc etc, half the mass dumped in, recovery time projected at 5 minutes vs ten minutes...

 

one cannot "fool" Mother Nature nor violate physical laws.  so, what you need is "more pots"

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks. That is good info. Do you know anything about pressure cooking on the stovetop or stand-alone large capacity pressure cookers?

post #4 of 8

>>Do you know anything about pressure cooking

 

yes.

 

pressure cookers "cook faster" because as the pressure increases, the boiling point of water gets higher.

higher 'ambient temperature' inside the pot results in faster heat transfer to "the cookee"

 

unfortunately, when you open the pressure cooker (note:  this takes cool down time, alternately explosion proof shields) so after you've expended the energy/time to get the pressure cooker 'up to speed' - it does its job 'fast' - but then you dump all that cooking efficiency in the trash, reduce the water/cooking environment to 'ambient,' and have to start 'rebuilding' the 'fast cook temperature at higher pressure' again.

 

you might reduce your "simmer time" from 10 minutes to three minutes; higher heat often equals tougher/chewier product - that's for you to judge. 

 

but as for "20 lbs of schufft" time required "start to finish"

bottom line:  complete loser.

 

"Thee may not fool Mother Nature nor may Thee violate Thine laws of Thermodynamics"

Thou needest more pots to simmer the same pounds of product in less overall time.

post #5 of 8

Get yourself a self contained steam kettle. They come in various sizes and shapes'

 

Boiling in a pot outside the temp will vary daily the wind blows the flame and the outside temperature have a big say in recoup time

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks for that tip. Do steam kettles get to boiling temp fast?

post #7 of 8
I have 6 different steam kettles. 2 40ltr, 3 100ltr and 1 200 ltr. All electrolux brand, all 3 phase. A couple are over 20 years old, full manule and the rest are anywhere from 6 yrs old to less than a year old full auto digital. They all work very well, quick. I can bring a pot 80% full to a rolling boil in 10 mins. 7 mins at 50% full.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post
 

Get yourself a self contained steam kettle. They come in various sizes and shapes'

 

Boiling in a pot outside the temp will vary daily the wind blows the flame and the outside temperature have a big say in recoup time


This!

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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