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Light gyuto for line cook

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi,

I'm looking for a new chef's knife. Currently I'm using a 270mm tojiro dp and a forschner. I am very happy with both, can get them to 'shaving sharp' level on whetstones, like the fact that they don't require any special care. One thing I don't like about tojiro is its weight, after 10h shift it can take a toll on my wrist, also it's not always best choice for jobs requiring some more precision. 

I've decided to get a lighter, possibly inch shorter and nimbler and most likely somewhat higher class knife, lets say up to 175e/200usd. So far after lurking around on this forum for some time i decided i like few choices:

masamoto vg

carbonext

mac pro

Any other recomendations?

post #2 of 12
The Masamoto 240 might be a light middle-weight, the 270 is a tank. The Carbonext 270 is remarkably light IIRC.
post #3 of 12
First I have to disclose its been years since I've been "trapped" for a 10hr shift, but those memories of when first starting out in prep and results of the repetition don't leave you lol.

I think all your targets are good ones and will add the reduction in length (240mm or less etc) will reduce weight while also putting your grip closer to the tip for me delicate work. All positives.

I don't own a CN but based on my experience with the semi carbon steel in the Konosuke HD I do own I can't help but recommend it (reviews here support it as well) for those seeking light weight and a good edge at a value price level (something the HD isn't at the current pricing, but still a great investment if your able to shell out the dollars).

Also if you decide to reduce the budget I have used the shorter 180mm Tojiro which feels like it would produce much less fatigue, and belive the 240 Fujiwara fkm is about one of the best values that still combines good ergonomics while being a good bit lighter than the Tojiro.

On the other hand if you can increase the budget some it opens you up to a host of possibilities of different brands, steels, and styles.

Also I learned from BDL that grip and cutting technique can have as great or greater effect on fatigue than the knife itself so could help if you advise yours etc. and also if this new purchase will be a replacement or addition to the Tojiro?

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #4 of 12

Hard to beat the carbonext for price in a 270

 

In a 240 cktg has it's Richmond line and the masahiro. 

 

Rick

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

My idea was to keep the tojiro, use it for bigger jobs (veg for 20l of gazpacho, roasted pots for sunday roast, actually it does a semi-decent job of carving the roast due to its length) and to use new knife for smaller, precision cuts etc

at this moment I often go back to victorinox for these and more than replacement for tojiro it would replace the swiss knife.

As for grip, its pinch on Vic and something resembling pinch on DP - despite having rather big hand I still need to move the palm further up the handle to comfortably put fingers on blade (need an extra inch ahaha).Another reason why I want a lighter knife is the height of prep/service area, which is quite high (not c.mfy at all) and there is little I can do about it.

post #6 of 12

I can confidently recommend the Sakai Takayuki wa Grand Chef in 240mm for what you're looking for. It is remarkably light and nimble. It falls in the price range you're looking for. I keep going back to mine, just love this knife and makes for a really nice lightweight workhorse knife.

 

I also own a 240mm Tojiro ITK Shirogami gyuto. Not sure how similar it is to the DP line but that is a fun knife to use but it is quite a bit heavier compared to the GC. I've even thinned mine quite a bit. Surely my Tojiro would not make for the best prep cook's knife, and I can see why you would want to replace your DP with something lighter.

 

I have also used the Fujiwara FKM 240mm gyuto. I liked that knife but it was quite a bit heavier/less nimble compared to my GC. (I also own a FKM 270mm sujihiki and those two FKM's are very different knives!)

 

Also, at that price range, I'd maybe look into a Sakai Yusuke. Basically the same thing as my GC but in White #2. If I ever replace my GC, it might be with that, or a Ginga, or maybe Konosuke but those last two are higher priced. 

post #7 of 12
I agree the FKM is not a feather weight, and comparing to the Konosuke that is obvious, but compared to the Tojiro DP I find it obviously lighter as well.

I'm also fairly confident that though the DP has a good blade that will get and stay sharp and is a great value etc it's problem for extensive use is a combination of ergonomics, handle, and weight.

Just a thought but since the OP is adding to and not replacing the Tojiro could it be beneficial to consider different styles other than a gyuto for the new addition?

Possibly a longer 210mm petty or sujihiki at 240 or longer in a premium brand and steel could be something to look into.

I know all they options can be confusing but that's also part of the fun.

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #8 of 12

If you can go a little more on the budget Randy at HHH has reduced some of his 240 production gyutos.  I have one and it's light, nimble, takes and holds a very good edge and has one of the better western handles out there.

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
I quite like the hhh gyuto however its over my budget. Another knife i was looking at is richmond addict 2, it is not offered with a western handle though, agree with Lennyd - too much choice for me haha
post #10 of 12

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/tagrchwa27.html

I just picked this up last month and couldn't be happier. Light, balanced and holds an edge really well.

post #11 of 12
For long service shifts, and not just prep sessions, select the most important features you'd like. If I had to choose a knife for service, it would have the following criteria:

1. Stainless: too many interruptions to properly care for a reactive blade.
2. Easy to sharpen/hone
3. Good to great edge retention
4. Tolerant of abuse

I like the smaller version of the Tojiro you already have as an option. I especially like it because the 210mm is under $100, so you won't feel bad thrashing on it. VG-10 is a proven workhorse steel, and has characteristics I feel are excellent for a professional kitchen.
post #12 of 12

I stand by Glestain. They're high quality but not fragile or brittle like a lot of Japanese knifes. They're a bit heavy, but when I'm doing small tasks that don't need a 6+ in blade I often use a utility knife, and the offset ones have a similar feel to a gyuto.

 

http://korin.com/Glestain-Indented-Blade-Petty

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