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Aluminum foil use during baking foods

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone. I want to start cooking some food in a countertop oven, mainly salmon or chicken. I was wondering if there would be any issues I would run into if I wanted to line the baking pan with aluminum foil, like less heating on the aluminum side? Aluminum reflects heat, but at the same time it is in contact with the baking pan which should conduct heat. Thanks.

post #2 of 6

I can't really see any major problems.  Your food will cook, but the foil might create hotter and cooler spots that's all.

post #3 of 6

Keep in mind that you will absorb some of the aluminum, which is toxic for you. I try using parchment paper whenever possible. Be especially careful with acidic foods (wine, lemon/lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes....). 

 

 

Aluminum foil used in cooking provides an easy channel for the metal to enter the human body. The increase in cooking temperature causes more leaching. The leaching is also highly dependent on the pH value of the food solution, salt, and spices added to the food solutions. Aluminum foil is not suitable for cooking specially with acidic food. It is also possible that excessive consumption of food baked with aluminum foil may carry a serious health risk. 

 

Source: http://www.electrochemsci.org/papers/vol7/7054498.pdf

post #4 of 6

I think the health risk for aluminum foil is a bit over blown. Nobody uses it on acidic foods if they are smart, or super salty foods. For baking something neutral the amount of aluminum transferred to the food is going to be less than the aluminum in the dust you swallow each day. Aluminum makes up a large part of the earths surface materials, it is common and in everything. And I have used it for years, same for my entire family and it has not had any affect. 3 generations would show a statistical sample if it was that bad. Use it on acidic food and your food ends up tasting like aluminum...

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Keep in mind that you will absorb some of the aluminum, which is toxic for you. I try using parchment paper whenever possible. Be especially careful with acidic foods (wine, lemon/lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes....). 

 

 

Aluminum foil used in cooking provides an easy channel for the metal to enter the human body. The increase in cooking temperature causes more leaching. The leaching is also highly dependent on the pH value of the food solution, salt, and spices added to the food solutions. Aluminum foil is not suitable for cooking specially with acidic food. It is also possible that excessive consumption of food baked with aluminum foil may carry a serious health risk. 

 

Source: http://www.electrochemsci.org/papers/vol7/7054498.pdf

The paper is a bit thin, to say the least. Yes, there is some amount of Al leaching from foil, but they fail to show that it reaches any problematic level. Also, to get any serious Al toxicology, you need rather massive amounts. As long as you do not cook super-acidic foods in aluminum foil on a daily basis, it should be fine, in my opinion.

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone. I'm going to stick with aluminum foil to help a bit with the cleanup. I checked my instruction booklet, it allowed for the use of foil, and noted that the coating on the baking/broiler pan can even come off with acidic foods.

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