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"Greek" yogurt culture in Amerika: 8( 8( 8(

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Having made yogurt for forty years, I've used Oikos Greek Yogurt for the past two or three years as my starter culture.  Yet, the last three batches I've made using a new container of Oikos for each, the batch has turned out very very cheesy.   And never in my years of yogurt making have I had three batches in a row turn out faulty.  Tasting the Oikos yogurt itself, it doesn't taste the same, way tooooo tangy, and so I'm switching to a non-Greek plain yogurt because something, I feel, has happened to the Oikos culture itself.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #2 of 19
Could you perhaps try Fage? It's available all over the EU, and is made in greece. I seem to recall reading here that it's also available in the USA.
post #3 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

I seem to recall reading here that it's also available in the USA.

It is, although it's made in the USA (in Johnstown, New York). Unfortunately many stores (especially Trader Joe's) don't carry the regular Fage greek yogurts and only have the low-fat versions. 

post #4 of 19

Yup - they built a plant in Johnstown, NY.  I plan on making my own Greek style yogurt in the near future.  I can't see any reason not to the Greeks back home in Detroit made it fresh. 

 

Once you get a batch can't you save your own culture like sourdough?

post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

Once you get a batch can't you save your own culture like sourdough?

Greek yogurt is strained yogurt - same culture. And you just use yogurt to make more yogurt, so yes, you can easily save a bit of the yogurt you made to start your next batch. 

post #6 of 19
Thankfully, UK Fage is made in Greece, using greek milk... Lots of 'Greek-style' yoghurts are sold here, made in the UK, France and Germany. I'll stick with the Greek manufactured stuff!
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

Once my yogurt is back on track, I may give Fage a try.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #8 of 19

It's so disturbing when a beloved brand's culture goes south. I used to buy a plain Indian yogurt made here in the US called Desi Dahai which had a lovely flavor and came in gallon containers but about a year ago it went from being a mild, milky yogurt to being downright astringent. I've since switched to Fage which I mix with Dannon, half and half because the Fage--while it is delicious-- is a bit too rich for me on its own. I haven't tried making my own from it, though.

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 

I'm finding Fage a bit too sour for my palette, too.  So I've purchased a quart of Dannon Plain Yogurt and not the fat-free kind.  I really prefer a creamy flavor for my yogurt that the commercial brands of Greek yogurt just don't provide.  And if I want extra thick yogurt, then I'll strain my own product thru cheesecloth and have an extra rich product without all of the sourness.

 

BTW I heard sometime not long ago in the news and I'll paraphrase: in order to call greek yogurt greek yogurt in this country, it must undergo a "certain process"; and, it was following that announcement that the flavor of Oikos changed.  And I don't know what that "certain process" is called exactly.


Edited by kokopuffs - 3/25/14 at 6:26am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #10 of 19

It was the Frugal Gourmet who introduced me to the trick oif straining any domestic yogurt through cheesecloth to achieve a Greek-like thick consistency.  I found that just lining the strainer with a single layer of a food-safe paper towel did just as well, avoiding the fuss, muss, and expense of cheesecloth. Been doing it that way for years.

 

He also said not to worry about finding room in the fridge- just leave the strainer and bowl on the counter overnight. I've never had a problem doing it that way.

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
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post #11 of 19

You make labneh the same way. You just let the yogurt strain even longer than you would for "Greek" style yogurt and after awhile you have yogurt cheese. Delicious with a little olive oil drizzled over it and eaten with pita bread. I like it on sandwiches with ripe tomato slices.

post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoTerry View Post
 

You make labneh the same way. You just let the yogurt strain even longer than you would for "Greek" style yogurt and after awhile you have yogurt cheese. Delicious with a little olive oil drizzled over it and eaten with pita bread. I like it on sandwiches with ripe tomato slices.


Love it!  8)   :roll:

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

Okay, after some experimentation here's what happened.  Prior to innoculation I heated my milk mixture, 60/40 milk + half and half, to 180F.  It was then allowed to rest for approx. 5 minutes followed by innoculation.  Now, the mixture is heated only to 160F before innoculating and it makes a difference.  The yogurt tastes like yogurt without cheesyness.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #14 of 19

Thanks for updating us @kokopuffs :)

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

Okay, after some experimentation here's what happened.  Prior to innoculation I heated my milk mixture, 60/40 milk + half and half, to 180F.  It was then allowed to rest for approx. 5 minutes followed by innoculation.  Now, the mixture is heated only to 160F before innoculating and it makes a difference.  The yogurt tastes like yogurt without cheesyness.


Hi Kokopuff.

I don't want to dispute the way you make yoghurt since you have been making it for a long time but I would like to shed some light that may bring your yoghurt making more full proof. This is only a suggestion.

Your innoculation (incubation) temp seems high (I work in Celsius so I took a while to catch this).  Yoghurt is usually made with thermophillic bactrial cultures.  They prefer to be kept at around 115F (46C). You can search for this term but here is a good easy read reference:

http://momprepares.com/making-homemade-yogurt-the-difference-between-thermophilic-and-mesophilic-yogurt/

 

My suggestion is to heat your milk to 80C (176F) is you want to pasteurize it then let it cool down to 120F (50C) and add your culture which will make the temp drop a couple of degrees.  Then maintain 115 (46C) until it firms up (6 to 12 h).

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 

delete delete delete

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc_H View Post
 


Hi Kokopuff.

I don't want to dispute the way you make yoghurt since you have been making it for a long time but I would like to shed some light that may bring your yoghurt making more full proof. This is only a suggestion....

Luc H.

 

One never stops learning.  To stop learning is to die!   ;)

 

@Luc_H:  THANKS for the good information.  In the future I'll heat my mixture to 160F as usual and then innoculate around 120F give or take a few degrees.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #18 of 19

Currently there is no Standard of Identity for the term Greek Yoghurt is the USA.  That means anything goes.  There has been class action suits attempted but nothing sticks since the regulations are so vague.

 

http://foodidentitytheft.com/calling-it-greek-yogurt-doesnt-mean-its-either-greek-or-yogurt/

 

If you are looking for authentic Greek yoghurt, read the ingredients.  Even if the company is Greek, if the yoghurt is sold in the USA it can contain a myriad of ingredients that would be illegal in the source country like whey protein and Milk protein concentrate (to thicken the yoghurt without straining).  Because of price competition and waste costs (and *environmental concerns), companies are trying not straining the yoghurt yet making it thick by other means.

 

*whey is becoming a environmental concern because the Greek yoghurt craze as meant that ton of it is being dumped and choking streams.

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc_H View Post
 

Currently there is no Standard of Identity for the term Greek Yoghurt is the USA.  That means anything goes. ....

 

 

My previous post has been edited.

 

But yes, to me Greek yogurt is yogurt that has been strained to almost approach yogurt cheese: thicker and with less liquid (whey).

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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