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Ceramic Pans Versus Marble Versus Diamond coated

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Hi

 

 

I have bee looking around for new non stick frying pan and lost with what to go for.

 

I am not keen on going for teflon, as mine seem to after some time get into the food and its not healthy

 

the other options are ceramic, marble coated and diamond coated.

 

I dont know whats myth from fact

 

The first one is a Red 3 piece set  only costs £13.99 for a set of 3, i cant see any reviews about the renberg ones anywhere

the next one looks nicer it is marble coated but one frying pan costs about £12.50

the next one is diamond coated which is about the same price (for a small one)

 

Anyone tried Marble Or Diamond Coated pans?

 

I have read the downside of ceramics, but cant make up my mind should i spend £13.99 for 3, or spend a bit more and go for marble coated

 

 

Thanks alot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 27

I recently purchased an 8" ceramic frying pan.  Haven't used it that much yet, but it is really slippery!  Too slippery for omelets, or at least my technique.  When you go to push on the edge as the eggs set, the whole mass moves in a way I don't want it to.

 

Great for scrambled, though, and sauted veggies and burger patties and such.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #3 of 27

@teamfat slippery you say that is wild. What brand pan did you go with? I have yet to try them just because they are so darn costly and I am not a big fan of spending a lot of cash on non-stick pans since they don't last long anyway.

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Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #4 of 27

I got one of these:

 

http://www.bialetti.com/cookware/aeternum-c-2_12.html

 

It was an impulse buy.  My wife was on the first floor buying shoes, I was waiting for her in the third floor kitchen department.  Marked down to $20 from $30.  My cast iron does the heavy lifting in the kitchen, I do have a few non-stick pieces.

 

mjb.

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post #5 of 27

Last week I bought my first ceramic coated pan just to see what they were about, and I was impressed with the food release.  Mine was nothing special that I picked up at Target on clearance for funzies.  I went as cheap as possible since I have no idea what I am getting into, and so far I will say it is pretty comparable to Teflon for eggs, without the cancer.

 

Keep in mind, I know next to nothing about ceramic coating and don't know what it is good for, what it is not etc etc.  But I took it home, washed it, heated it, put oil in it, and put cold eggs in the pan and they did not stick at all.  I haven't tested cold pan, cold oil and cold eggs yet, so I do not know how comparable to Teflon it really is, but since I do not cook eggs like that anyways, that wouldn't matter.  So far I am a convert.  The only reason I do not use carbon steel or cast iron for eggs, is I got tired of meddling with seasoning and my girlfriend needs something simple to use without worrying about technique much.

 

To me, even if they aren't good for certain things, they're good for eggs in my book so I am done with Teflon.  I know nothing about the durability of the finish yet either but I will update.  Hopefully they are as or more durable than Teflon because I would totally rock these on a breakfast line.

post #6 of 27

So I don't know if this is for all ceramic coated pans but the finish on this is not very durable physically.  Baby it like Teflon.

post #7 of 27

I had a green pan once. I understand they use some sort of ceramic coating as well. I loved it... for a bout a week or two. Then it started becoming sticky, the coating stained, later started chipping... and who wants sharp bits of ceramic laced with who-knows-what in their food!? Back to stainless steel and carbon steel for me. Thanks to advice I got from this very board, I can fry an egg in my stainless steel pan with very little butter (the advice was pretty much to take your time warming up the pan slowly, and keeping it not too hot, the butter shouldn't sizzle when you add it to the pan). Never sticks. 

post #8 of 27

Yeah, I think I'm going to end up right where you are.  But only a week?  Holy crapola that is really bad.  I myself have cooked eggs in stainless, I just don't like to.  I always preferred the flat top at work, and it is like a big seasoned carbon steel pan.

 

I myself love carbon steel.  I have this french pan I seasoned for weeks slowly with flax oil in the oven and it works like a dream now. I love it more than all my cast iron now.  Bets egg pan I have ever owned.

post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post
 

Yeah, I think I'm going to end up right where you are.  But only a week?  Holy crapola that is really bad. 

Ok so I may have exaggerated a bit. I just remember being very disappointed. That was a while ago. I'm sure a big flat top is great - I've never used one but I've found the rims of the pan are often an obstacle to sliding a spatula under the food...

 

I have to reseason my carbon steel pan. I have flax seed oil in my fridge. I just need to find the time... which is why I've been using stainless steel lately. 

post #10 of 27

My Calpholon Unison pans felt like sandpaper when I first got them but absolutely nothing sticks to them, very slippery with just a touch of oil.   Now the surface is smooth, makes me wonder if I've been eating ceramic, I have heard that they do leach something.

 

Can't say how long they will last at this point, but a small bit of coating did fall off in a spot.  Foodpump and another chef swore by them in a post on this subject that I made a short while back.

 

I bought a KitcheAide pan because I didn't like the shape of the Unison for omelet rolling. It's coating looks and feels like Teflon, only shinier.  No idea at this point how it will hold up.

 

 

Rick

post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post

 
Yeah, I think I'm going to end up right where you are.  But only a week?  Holy crapola that is really bad. 
Ok so I may have exaggerated a bit. I just remember being very disappointed. That was a while ago. I'm sure a big flat top is great - I've never used one but I've found the rims of the pan are often an obstacle to sliding a spatula under the food...

I have to reseason my carbon steel pan. I have flax seed oil in my fridge. I just need to find the time... which is why I've been using stainless steel lately. 

You weren't exaggerating .
Mine lasted about two weeks .......

mimi
post #12 of 27
I have 2 of the newwave cermic fry pans, you still need oil but they are ok. Eggs will stick to glass so I think oil is always needed besides its only teaspoon, don't know what the fuss is about oil. I also have 2 marble coated pan bought off amazon made in Korea, they work great, haven't had anything stick and pans look same as the day they arrived. I had calpholon none stick anodized aluminum pans, didn't stay none stick for long and you could see the bottom degrading in the pan. Is there a none stick pan that never needs oil, not yet for my money
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post


You weren't exaggerating .
Mine lasted about two weeks .......

Ha, thanks mimi. Only thing I remember is, back then I was trying to get away from Teflon and I really thought those ceramic coated pans were going to be the solution... and that's when I ended up getting my stainless steel and carbon steel pans. I have never looked back. 

post #14 of 27
I was disappointed.
frown.gif

My SIL kept going on about how great the non stick was so I ordered one.
All I used it for was scrambled eggs and right from the get go I could tell it was no better that the garden variety Teflon.
Started sticking on the edges right away.

mimi
post #15 of 27

What's wrong with Teflon anyway?  I only use nonstick pans for eggs and I've never had any flake or peel off on me.  Don't use it for stir fry. Don't use it at crazy high heat to sear a steak.  Just eggs.  Don't let others in your household use it and scratch it with metal utensils.  For it's intended purpose, did i mention EGGS ONLY, it works great.

 

BTW the tramontina proline 10" nonstick fry pan 2 pack at costco was $30

 

For everything else, carbon steel, cast iron, or stainless.  BTW with good seasoning and sometimes beeswax I've had little problems cooking eggs even on these.

post #16 of 27
I have no beef with non stick surfaces that are non stick.
What I have a problem with is being stupid enuf to shell out almost $40 for a 9 in piece of crapola.
I see they are now pushing a whole line of that particular pan.
Saw that coming a mile away.

mimi
post #17 of 27

I love my Demeyere non-stick pans (the gray coated ones in the picture). What a difference with Tefal pans and Teflon coating! These( 3-ply plus non-stick coating) Demeyere pans heat up incredibly fast but you need to reduce the fire before adding eggs or whatever to the pan or they will cook much too fast! Demeyere warns their clients to not use pure olive oil; seems it stains the coating. Adding a bit of butter or other oil to the olive oil prevents the staining.

Not the cheapest ones, but they come with a 5 year guarantee.

 

Demeyere 7-ply pans

post #18 of 27
Excaliber was a none stick surface that was supposed to be the greatest and could use metal init. It was supposed to be so durable since stainless particles were blasted into the pan making nucks the none stick surfaced filled in. Like butter on a Thomas english muffin you can't scrap the butter back out without digging out the muffin.
post #19 of 27

Just bought an 8-inch ceramic pan (Bialetti) and scrambled an egg in it today with no problem.  I did read a review that there is a low end as well as a high end version of this pan and that the low end pan has a red handle and red side and did not perform well.  Mine has a stainless steel handle as well as a stainless steel rim (the other reviewer said that her rim chipped also).  Your picture looks like the low end.  The Bialetti was $19.99 at Bed, Bath and Beyond (before coupon).  Had earlier bought a Red Copper ceramic pan (also at BBB) but returned - bottom was so rough I didn't want to use it on glass stove top.


Edited by Betty Hilliard - 7/11/16 at 1:43pm
post #20 of 27

I have that same marble coated pan - accidentally burned up the 8-inch one but still use the larger one when frying salmon cakes, cornbread cakes (I'm Southern).It still looks new - however I replaced the 8-inch one with a ceramic pan - will see how that does for scrambled eggs, one-egg omelet, or one sausage patty.  Have been frying one sausage patty in the 10-inch pan and it cleaned easily.  Haven't tried bacon (I microwave that on a special grease-draining tray).

post #21 of 27

I picked up 2 of the Green ceramic pans from Walmart. Been using the smaller for omelets, burgers, frying potatoes... it is 6 months old and still slippery. Showing a few pits now but nothing major. The larger I mainly use for bacon and eggs over easy and it is also 6 months old and going fine.

post #22 of 27

Well the Calophon Unison omelet pan lasted for less than a year in terms of losing its super non-stick properties.  The ceramic coating fractures and chips and things start to stick, but only just enough to prevent the perfect sliding action a new pan gives.  A light coat of oil before bringing the pan up to just barely smoking still gives me all the slip I really need to do omelets, but I much preferred the action it had when new.

 

I still would like to hear a report on the Swiss Diamond pans, which have the neat feature of being cast construction.

post #23 of 27

We bought the 20 & 30 cm Marble Coated Forge fry pans from Target.

For the first few uses they were perfect but after that they gradually got worse.

After about a month of use now everything sticks.

The pans look the same but have just become super stick.

Does anyone have any suggestions to make them usable again?

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Jackson View Post
 

We bought the 20 & 30 cm Marble Coated Forge fry pans from Target.

For the first few uses they were perfect but after that they gradually got worse.

After about a month of use now everything sticks.

The pans look the same but have just become super stick.

Does anyone have any suggestions to make them usable again?


I've had the EXACT same experience with all those ceramic green pans diamond coated etc.....

 

My suggestion is to ditch the pan and use something else. I use stainless steel pans mostly, and carbon steel sometimes.

post #25 of 27

I was a line cook about 30 years ago and we used teflon pans for eggs and they were perfect. Silicone spatulas were the only utensil used, and cleaning consisted of using a paper towel to wipe the pans. With that heavy use, and not getting the pan too hot, they lasted probably 3-4 months before starting to stick, which is great for the price and the ease of use. We had no time for sticky pans. That would have been at least a few thousand eggs per pan.

 

Now I always use teflon pans at home for eggs, with care, and throw them out when there's any sign of the teflon degrading, which is after 6-12 months of use, minimum. My current fry pan is a low-priced Revere Ware 6" one and I've had it over a year, maybe 2, and it's still in good shape. My only complaint about this pan is that the pan is light relative to the handle weight and it heats more on the handle side (with this electric stovetop) unless you hold it with your hand or rest a spatula on the opposite side or something, to press the pan down evenly.

 

I need to try stainless or carbon steel. I also wish I had a gas stove.


Edited by OregonYeti - 11/16/16 at 2:45pm
post #26 of 27

My most used Calphalon Unison ceramic omelette pan was egg-serviceable for about 4 years, though just barely with mild seasoning for most of that, but it is heavy and was super non stick for starters.  I still use it for things like small steaks, but not so much for eggs.  I have a KitchenAide ceramic omlette pan that seems to be holding together, but it hasn't yet seen the use of the Calphalon.  Just $10 bucks at the discount department store, about half of what to other typically can be had for on sale.

 

Again I still wondered about the Swiss Diamond brand, especially since they are cast aluminum, but haven't been able to get any feedback on them, wow, since I first mention them in 2011.


Edited by Rick Alan - 11/16/16 at 3:41pm
post #27 of 27

Because there are no diamonds found in Switzerland. Just kidding.

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