or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › Advisory Committee Hunt
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Advisory Committee Hunt

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hello all,

 

I'm a Culinary Arts Instructor at a high school regional tech center in Bradford, VT and am looking for a select few individuals to help me form an Advisory Committee and contribute here.

 

The commitment would entail:

 

Introducing yourself highlighting qualifications, age, sex, and general location.

 

Answering my questions posed.

 

Posing any questions you feel appropriate.

 

 

So, without further adieu:

 

My name is Tom DuBois.  Male, 33.  Grew up in RI but moved north 7 years ago.  Grew up in a gourmet-ish seafood restaurant in Bristol, RI - The Lobster Pot.  Went to J&W for 2 years - A.A.S. Culinary.  Worked for a small cruise line out of Warren, RI - The American Canadian Caribbean Line.  Went back to Rhode Island College for Career & Tech Ed. while kitchen managing a bar & grill. Student taught at Davie's in Lincoln, RI.  Taught at an alternative school for punk boys in NH while pursuing grad school for Special Ed. - M.Ed.  And now I'm here.

 

The questions:

 

What are your top 5 deal breakers/makers when hiring entry level employees?

 

What trends do you see gaining traction in your area?

 

What do you value more when hiring professional personnel, renowned post-secondary education or 2 years entry-level experience?

 

What is your "must-have" piece of equipment and why?

 

 

 

Thanks for participating!

post #2 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi all, I know it's my first post but I could really use the input.  

post #3 of 22
Quote:
What are your top 5 deal breakers/makers when hiring entry level employees?
  • Visible tattoos, piercings, etc.
  • Poor personal hygiene
  • "Smart A$$" attitude
  • Entitlement attitude
  • How much "time off" do I get?
Quote:
 What trends do you see gaining traction in your area?

Fast food

Quote:
What do you value more when hiring professional personnel, renowned post-secondary education or 2 years entry-level experience?

2 years of on-time work experience

Quote:
 What is your "must-have" piece of equipment and why?

A sharp Chef's knife and the tools to maintain it.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #4 of 22

Not to seem rude - but what you are looking for is what a lot of us ask money for.

 

Hire a consultant - they cost money but they also have the answers.

 

 

-----

 

 

Now ... if you really want to become a consultant and answer all these questions, I'd suggest working in the industry for about 20-30 years to gain your 'cred... then start throwing us test clowns a few benjamins...

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #5 of 22

Think if you browse and read the threads here for a bit you'll get a few answers to your questions.

post #6 of 22

I wont take up your time by having to read mine, but they are almost  the same as what Pete wrote in his answer to you., and most likely what all easoned  pro's will answer.

 

P/S  How long have you been in this business,? and beside the 2 places listed where else ave you worked?

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post
 

I wont take up your time by having to read mine, but they are almost  the same as what Pete wrote in his answer to you., and most likely what all easoned  pro's will answer.

 

P/S  How long have you been in this business,? and beside the 2 places listed where else ave you worked?

 

Thanks. 15 years.  

 

let's see: KM for a Bar & Grill, And taught at an alternative farm school for punk boys.  

post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post
 

Not to seem rude - but what you are looking for is what a lot of us ask money for.

 

Hire a consultant - they cost money but they also have the answers.

 

 

-----

 

 

Now ... if you really want to become a consultant and answer all these questions, I'd suggest working in the industry for about 20-30 years to gain your 'cred... then start throwing us test clowns a few benjamins...

Not to seem rude but dId you miss the fact that I'm a teacher?  Hiring a consultant is not on the horizon.

post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks Pete.  Very helpful

post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

Think if you browse and read the threads here for a bit you'll get a few answers to your questions.

That's why I'm here.  See, I need them compiled so it will look like a "committee."

post #11 of 22

Tom, where is "here?"  

post #12 of 22
Tom I take it you are new to this job....

I hate hiring kids that did a culinary program at a high school tech center. They are without a doubt the worst hires I have ever made. They are entitled think they already know everything. Going to the culinary program at the local tech school is probably about the worst thing a person can have on their resume when I'm hiring. Kids that come out of those programs are too lazy to finish school properly, too disinterested to do automotive, carpentry, metal work, etc. they're basically the very bottom of the barrel, but still think they're too good to do dishes because they've been trained as a chef.

These kids are destined for McDonalds, my advice to you to keep from losing your mind in that kind of job is look for the very very occasional kid that is really there to be a chef and give him your ENTIRE attention. Then you will have maybe done at least some good.

A good knife is important. But if a kid turned up with his own pot scrubbing gloves I would hug him and take him in as my own offspring.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomDuBois View Post
 

The commitment would entail:

 

Introducing yourself highlighting qualifications, age, sex, and general location.

Hi! it's me! I cook! GTFO/nope/USA

.....

Students

Students with finicky schedules

Hygiene

Arrogance

Gauge holes in ears, you pig disgusting ... gross.

.....

Trailers, carts, street food. Smoke it. Porchetta. For cheap.

.....

I don't even know what "post-secondary education" means. Is that like finishing school? I don't even

.....

My meat hooks.

.....

 

Did I win? Am I committed?

post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

Tom, where is "here?"  

Here: this forum, this thread.

post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastmasterflex View Post

Tom I take it you are new to this job....

I hate hiring kids that did a culinary program at a high school tech center. They are without a doubt the worst hires I have ever made. They are entitled think they already know everything. Going to the culinary program at the local tech school is probably about the worst thing a person can have on their resume when I'm hiring. Kids that come out of those programs are too lazy to finish school properly, too disinterested to do automotive, carpentry, metal work, etc. they're basically the very bottom of the barrel, but still think they're too good to do dishes because they've been trained as a chef.

These kids are destined for McDonalds, my advice to you to keep from losing your mind in that kind of job is look for the very very occasional kid that is really there to be a chef and give him your ENTIRE attention. Then you will have maybe done at least some good.

A good knife is important. But if a kid turned up with his own pot scrubbing gloves I would hug him and take him in as my own offspring.

 

Ha!  Thanks.  I needed the laugh.  And I knew full well what I was getting myself into.  

post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by left4bread View Post
 

Hi! it's me! I cook! GTFO/nope/USA

.....

Students

Students with finicky schedules

Hygiene

Arrogance

Gauge holes in ears, you pig disgusting ... gross.

.....

Trailers, carts, street food. Smoke it. Porchetta. For cheap.

.....

I don't even know what "post-secondary education" means. Is that like finishing school? I don't even

.....

My meat hooks.

.....

 

Did I win? Am I committed?

Certainly committable.  Thanks.

 

in case you weren't kidding (sarcasm lends itself so well to text), post-secondary means after high school.  As in GTFO 

post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomDuBois View Post
 

Hello all,

 

I'm a Culinary Arts Instructor at a high school regional tech center in Bradford, VT and am looking for a select few individuals to help me form an Advisory Committee and contribute here.

 

The commitment would entail:

 

Introducing yourself highlighting qualifications, age, sex, and general location.

 

Answering my questions posed.

 

Posing any questions you feel appropriate.

 

 

So, without further adieu:

 

Nic Phillips.  currently Exec/Head chef in South of France. 56 years old Trained  in London, Apprenticed in Paris at 3 Michelin Star Establishment.  Have worked in  London, Paris, Washington DC, Maui, San Francisco, Miami, Aachen, Los Angeles, and Now in Languedoc- Rousillon, Southern France.

The questions:

 

What are your top 5 deal breakers/makers when hiring entry level employees?

Attitude, Attitude, Attitude, Attitude, Attitude

 

What trends do you see gaining traction in your area?

Sous Vide, Organics, Farm to Fork.

 

What do you value more when hiring professional personnel, renowned post-secondary education or 2 years entry-level experience?

Experience

 

What is your "must-have" piece of equipment and why?

 Water Bath and Vac pac. Cannot get the results I want any other way.

 

 

 

Thanks for participating!

post #18 of 22

I wont take up your time by having to read mine, but they are almost  the same as what Pete wrote in his answer to you

 

I would sooner hire a kid out of Burger King or Mcdonalds then a culinary school. Call it attitude .. Also they would know what it means to work.

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #19 of 22

The questions:

 

What are your top 5 deal breakers/makers when hiring entry level employees? Attitude is everything, the number one thing that I look at. Not deal breakers, but point losers:  showing up to fill out application in tee shirt and jeans, having to borrow a pen in order to fill out application, spelling errors on application (shows lack of attention to detail), poor posture during interview, lack of eye contact

 

What trends do you see gaining traction in your area? farm to fork, sustainability, local sourcing

 

What do you value more when hiring professional personnel, renowned post-secondary education or 2 years entry-level experience? neither, you have to look at all the brushstrokes to effectively evaluate a picture

 

What is your "must-have" piece of equipment and why? a rubber spatula, helps to control the dollars and sense (cents)


Edited by cheflayne - 4/22/14 at 3:24pm
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Santona 1937 View Post
 

 

Thanks Nic.  That Sous Vide stuff is wild - I've only seen it done.  

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomDuBois View Post
 

 

Thanks Nic.  That Sous Vide stuff is wild - I've only seen it done.  

 Sous vide is not just for Modernist cuisine. we Vac pac all our proteins when they first get delivered and. date mark them. It allows us to hold  them an extra day or so if we have to. We can then cook them  sous vide and hold them for a wee bit longer if we have to. All in all the process allows us to hold proteins a little longer than we would otherwise be able to, and without freezing gives a better end product. The main reasons we do this are food cost, and we feel that we get a much better end product, which for our fine dining outlet is a key parameter.   used properly vac packing and water bathing  can really save you some euros each month. It Also allows us to use rougher/ cheaper cuts of meat and end up with a silky smooth soft mouth feel. 

 Almost all the sous vide we do is with proteins, ( it really does give a more consistent product)  but we are starting to play with sous vide sauces and vegetables as well.

post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Santona 1937 View Post
 

 Sous vide is not just for Modernist cuisine. we Vac pac all our proteins when they first get delivered and. date mark them. It allows us to hold  them an extra day or so if we have to. We can then cook them  sous vide and hold them for a wee bit longer if we have to. All in all the process allows us to hold proteins a little longer than we would otherwise be able to, and without freezing gives a better end product. The main reasons we do this are food cost, and we feel that we get a much better end product, which for our fine dining outlet is a key parameter.   used properly vac packing and water bathing  can really save you some euros each month. It Also allows us to use rougher/ cheaper cuts of meat and end up with a silky smooth soft mouth feel. 

 Almost all the sous vide we do is with proteins, ( it really does give a more consistent product)  but we are starting to play with sous vide sauces and vegetables as well.

 

Hey, thanks for the info.  The only thing I've done that remotely resembles it is the old scrambled eggs in a bag.  Ever play with those?  Don't forget your hairnet.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › Advisory Committee Hunt