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Advice on a finishing stone

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

At the monment I have a 800 and a 2000 chosera stones. I'm happy with those but starting to feel the need for a higher grit stone. I feel that the 2000 takes a bit much material when only touching up my knife. Now I feel that the chosera 5000 is to expensive. What are some good choice for around 5000 yen. I will buy it from japan since I have a frind who lives there at the moment and stones are heavy and shiping expensive.

post #2 of 19
Which steel types do you sharpen?
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

At the moment I have only one good kitchen knife, a masamoto ct. The stones I have were bought to sharpen my outdoor knifes mostly and those are most 12c27. For outdoor use I am happy with the 2000 grit I have, it is for the kitchen knife I feel a need for a finer stone.

I probably don't need a finer stone but since my friend will move home from japan this spring and stones are so much cheaper when you don't have to pay shiping. I feel that it may be a good idea to buy a stone that I will need to progress in hand sharpening.

post #4 of 19
I happen to use the very same configuration -- Chosera 800 and 2k -- and use the 5k only for better deburring. I don't find the 2k that abrasive and I don't know whether you look for a full polishing on a high grit stone. You may consider stropping on split (rough) leather for loosening remaining burrs. Abrading should work with the 2k, with a very light touch, and almost longitudinal strokes.
Your soft carbon Masamoto would benefit from stropping with Cr2O3. I use artist's acrylic paint (olive green) on leather or soft wood. Costs a little.
Edited by Benuser - 3/25/14 at 2:05pm
post #5 of 19

If you look through the archives our resident knife expert BDL couldn't say enough good about the Geshin 8K sold by Japanese Knife Imports.  Very fast cutting for an 8k so you could easily jump to it from the 2K.  I like the higher grits myself and finish with something that I'm guessing is about 12k.

 

Rick

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

Japanese Knife Imports import to the wrong part of the world. I live in sweden. Also that stone cost more than I want to spend. I'm tinking about the Shaputon pro series. Or I think it's the pro series, http://item.rakuten.co.jp/tool4u/kuromaku5000/#kuromaku5000 
 

post #7 of 19

Ah too bad the Geshin is out.  Along with the Shapton at the same price is the Naniwa snow white 8K, which BDL also highly recommended, not liking the lack of feedback with the Shapton.

 

Rick

post #8 of 19
In Europe, a Naniwa 5k SuperStone would cost you €64,90.

http://www.knivesandtools.nl/nl/searchresults.htm?query=Naniwa

If you get from outside the Union, add import tax, your local VAT and handling costs.
Edited by Benuser - 3/26/14 at 5:49pm
post #9 of 19

Buy once cry once.  It doesn't get much better than the 5k Chocera, IMO.  The 8k Snow White is also a great stone but I don't like to make that big a jump (2k to 8k).  YMMV.  The 5k Shapton Pro is a good stone but very hard. I prefer softer stones but you may not. 

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 

8k Snow White seems really intresting but it cost twice what the shapton 5k and I don't think I can justify that price difference.

I don't know if I like hard stones since I have only used the choseras I have nothing to compere to.

post #11 of 19

I have a few Suehiro stones and they are damn good stones just not readily available in the US. I have a Cerax 8K as a finisher. Probably get a 5K to go between the 2K and your finisher.

 

Check out Tools from Japan and see the variety.

 

http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=335_405_583

 

Through the grapevine many stones are dirt cheap over there by comparison.

 

Jim

post #12 of 19

Iminishi are excellent stones, hard, splash and go, and not too pricey.

 

Rick


Edited by Rick Alan - 3/30/14 at 11:07pm
post #13 of 19

I really like my Arashiyama 6000. It's a very well regarded stone among knife nuts. A very versatile stone that can be used as a soaker or a splash and go. I use mine as my last step before stropping but might be looking at getting a kitayama or snow white or gesshin 8k as my finishing. I use the Arashiyama after a Bester 1200 and it makes the jump just fine. 

post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 

Now I have got and tried my stone. I bought a shapton pro stone for around 4500 yen. For that price it is incredibel.  It cuts fast but the biggest difference I feel is that the burr is much more noticeable at smaller levels. Don't know if this is common on all high grit stones. 

post #15 of 19
I really the the shapton pro, great splash and go stone have it in my knife bag and it easy to travel with no water dripping out when traveling. Because it is a hard stone does not dish fast and also cuts pretty fast. I also have Rika 5k also and that is also a good inexpensive finishing stone, hope this helps

Allen
post #16 of 19

Whatever you get, I'd lurk on other forums (heck even ebay) and buy a gently used stones to save some dough. I got a shapton pro 8k for 60 bucks (replaced my kitayama). 

post #17 of 19

I've used a 5K Naniwa SS you several years now. Soft, easy to gouge, dishes fast but works like a charm. When I replace it I will get the Chosera and not look back. Beyond that I use an 8K Kityama.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #18 of 19
Just wonder whether you will feel the need of any refinement after the Chosera 5k. I use it only for further deburring after a Chosera 2k. After that, a few strokes on split leather perhaps. Not so sure it does anything.
post #19 of 19

I don't even use the SS #5000 anymore. Stop at #1000-1200 and ocassionaly deburr on chromium loaded strop.

I guess i'm not anymore a sharpness nerd as i used to be.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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