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"Desalting" a broth

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello, we have recently started doing two different poultry confits in large volume, and I have been saving the confit jelly to fortify stocks, soups, etc. Currently I have about a gallon of it but the salt content is much too high, although the flavor behind the salt is absolutely incredible, like everything you would want in ramen broths except the pork.  I plan on clarifying it, but would have gone with ice filtration if I hadn't had the idea while separating eggs that perhaps an egg raft clarification would in effect leach some of the salt content as well as some of the flavor, so if no extra salt was added, the result would indeed be a "desalted" consomme.  Anybody out there have experience with this?

 

Darren

post #2 of 7

Try simmering a couple of peeled potatoes in the broth. That should help eliminate the salt. Clarification wouldn't hurt. 

post #3 of 7

Unlike pepper, salt  is soluable in liquid and extremely hard to remove. Cooking a potato is one way but is not 100%. Only thing I can think of is to add more liquid,

CHEFED
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post #4 of 7

Welcome AE711!,

we use "confit jelly" as a base or to finish a dish not reserved just for broths. Personally wouldn't think to change it as it took so long to create such a wonderful by product. In abundance will reduce just to save space. Also we keep them separate, duck, chicken, goose etc.

 

  Try some on your mashed roots in place of, or added to gravy, to finish roasted roots depending on the dish, sauces, pastas, beans, sauteed green beans, brussel sprouts, etc., and as a compound butter. We've done schmaltzed green beans using a strong broth from chicken jelly to quick poach, then into the schmaultz to brown, received well btw. Duck fat spuds, duck jelly to season the raw spuds in a hot pan before adding duck fat, hell we even floated it in a coffee can for corn on the cob!

 

Very useful "secret" ingredient.

 

Remember the confit process involves a cure so the "jelly" will always concentrate flavor+salt.

 

 

Cheers!,

 

 

EDG

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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post #5 of 7

Make an equivalent amount of 'unsalted' stock and combine with the confit jelly - you have now reduced the salt by 1/2 or 50%

 

If still to salty make another equivalent amount of 'unsalted' stock as the original confit jelly and combine ....

 

(etc. etc.)

 

Potatoes will not 'suck-up' salt nor will any other 'trick';  the salt won't be removed only masked.  Masking isn't really desired as it is ... still to salty - you just don't notice it as much.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #6 of 7

I'm with Michael here. Masking it is only a last-minute measure. Best prepare unsalted stock and mix until satisfactory.

post #7 of 7
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