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Off the wall sandwich ideas? - Page 2

post #31 of 43

OK, Cheflayne...

 

I've had Reubens (a favorite of mine) at many restaurants, Cubanos at many Cuban-style restaurants, and the Especial which wasn't Cuban-style but just plain Cuban, at Sloppy Joe's Bar and Restaurant in pre-Castro Havana. I copied it and it's been a family favorite ever since.

 

The Especial is a Dagwood-size production with many layers of cold cuts of five or six varities, interspersed with slices of different cheeses and mayo and mustard on wide slices of wonderful Cuban rye bread. The whole thing was six inches high and nine inches wide and a good 2-1/2 inches thick.  I always headed straight for Sloppy Joe's for an Especial whenever my ship spent a few days in Havana for liberty.

You could get into more trouble in Havana, in those days, for less money than anywhere else I ever visited in the Navy. :peace:

 

Sorry for the digression. 

 

So what, exactly, is a Cuban Reuben, please?

 

Thanks,

 

Mike

 

Someday I'll tell you about hoisting a couple frozen daiquiris with Ernie Hemingway as he held court at the left end of the bar in the Floridita restaurant . Those were the days! ;)

travelling gourmand
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post #32 of 43

I have done it a few different ways, current version.

 

Cuban bread

Cuban roasted pork

pastrami

Swiss cheese

bread and butter pickled onions

mayo dressing with whole grain mustard, caraway seeds, tabasco, lime juice

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #33 of 43

Cheflane--

 

What, no kraut and no Russian dressing??  Sounds like an OK Cuban-ish sandwich, but not  much of a Reuben. Even paired with a couple cold  bottles of The One-Eyed Indian, this really doesn't fulfill the complete Reuben specs.

 

Mike

 

But, wasn't that Cuban bread wonderful!

 

Alltogether now... shout HATUEY!   That will help set the ambiance, anyway.

 

M


Edited by MikeLM - 4/4/14 at 8:52pm
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post #34 of 43

I have done it that way also, but then the pendulum swings back to too much of a Reuben and not enough Cuban. I like the pickled onions as kind of bridge in place of the kraut. Still a work in progress, but one that I am more than happy to toil away at.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #35 of 43

Well, proper Reuben or not, I am definitely going to try this. Please keep us informed of future research.

 

Are the bread & butter pickled onions different than regular pickled ones, such as I use in my Gibsons?

 

Mike


Edited by MikeLM - 4/5/14 at 8:41am
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post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

I have done it that way also, but then the pendulum swings back to too much of a Reuben and not enough Cuban. I like the pickled onions as kind of bridge in place of the kraut. Still a work in progress, but one that I am more than happy to toil away at.


Well this is all very inspirational, and I am thinking Cuban-Reubin-Muffuletta.  For the Muffuletta the B+B onions tossed with sliced queen olive and some oil-cured also, with shaved fennel replacing all else.  Well, it's not really Muffuletta I gues. I would happily alternate between the TI dressing or mayo/pesto-mayo, or, well whatever.

 

Rick

post #37 of 43

The bread and butter pickled onions are a quick refridgerator pickled onion with a crispy bite still. I like to use, French cut, yellow Bermuda onions. The brine is a 4/2/1 (vinegar/sugar/water) seasoned with pickling spice, black peppercorn, yellow mustard seed, bay leave, Ceylon cinnamon, turmeric, and salt.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #38 of 43

Tony, that sounds like my kind of sandwich.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #39 of 43

Chicken breast mango arugula(rocket) sandwich.

Pan Bagnat.

Strogonoff sub(either chicken or beef strogonoff, don' judge it till you try it).

Chicken, mushroom, bacon and cheese.

Roasted garlic and parsley mayo with pork.

post #40 of 43

Thanks for the pickled recipe cheflayne.

 

Rick

post #41 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

The bread and butter pickled onions are a quick refridgerator pickled onion with a crispy bite still. I like to use, French cut, yellow Bermuda onions. The brine is a 4/2/1 (vinegar/sugar/water) seasoned with pickling spice, black peppercorn, yellow mustard seed, bay leave, Ceylon cinnamon, turmeric, and salt.

 

I love ratio's

 

If you want to take it in another direction you can make Do Chua (Vietnamese Pickled Daikon Radish and Carrot)

 

Just use the same 4/2/1 ratio but Water / Vinegar / Sugar

Only need to add garlic for seasonings, about 1 medium clove per cup of water or to your tastes!  (you will need to salt the veggies first to soften and then rinse them)

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #42 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post
 

If you want to take it in another direction you can make Do Chua (Vietnamese Pickled Daikon Radish and Carrot)

I also thought about a variation of a Malay onion sambal Just need to play around with it to make it more Cuban Reubenesque.

 

Malay Onion Sambal

 

Weight or Volume                                                                  Ingredients

3                                                                                              red onions, French cut

3 tablespoons                                                                          salt

¼ cup                                                                                      rice wine vinegar

3 tablespoons                                                                          apricot jam

2                                                                                              Thai chiles, crushed

1 ½ tablespoons                                                                      cilantro, chopped

1 ½ cups, packed                                                                    mint, chopped

 

Procedure:

Combine onions and salt. Squeeze and work onions with your hands gently for 3 minutes. Place onions in cold water and swirl to wash off salt. Strain onions out of water and place in linen cloth. Fold up cloth. Squeeze and twist cloth to remove as much liquid as possible. Pat onions dry with paper towels. Combine vinegar, jam, and chiles and heat up to incorporate jam. Pour onto onions and add remaining ingredients, stirring well to mix.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #43 of 43
Thread Starter 

Even more great ideas, I absolutely love the feedback. Any other ideas?

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