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Cooking radishes

post #1 of 9
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Tonight I cooked radishes for the first time. I love doing something for the first time, especially when it's a new technique I just learned about, with an ingredient that I have known all my life. I got this idea right here on cheftalk when @ordo shared his beautiful plate of a perfectly grilled steak with cooked radishes. 

 

I had a ball of celeriac so I made a celeriac puree, went to the store and got some ground pork and a bulb of fennel. The fennel was diced, mixed with freshly picked mint, fronds, lemon juice and olive oil. I mixed the pork with sweated onions, garlic, breadcrumbs soaked in milk and a liberal amount of grated parm and fresh lemon zest. I was quite happy as I just made it up as I went along and the resulting pork/lemon/cheese patties were actually very very good. 

 

I was quite proud of my idea of mixing mint with fennel, thinking they got together rather well, but my wife didn't like the result. Guess I won't be doing that again soon. Has anyone else tried that combination?

 

Back to the radishes: I placed a generous knob of butter in the heated pan and let it bubble, added the radishes and a few small turnips I had, and sauteed them a bit to lovingly wrap them in a luscious melted butter envelope, covered the pan, and let them roast on slow heat for about 20 or 25mn, sauteeing them once in a while. I added salt throughout the second half of the cooking. 

 

It was really good! :) I was surprised how much the radishes kept their radish taste, even cooked: I was expecting them to mellow much more. Don't get me wrong, they lost nearly all their "bite" but they still tasted very much like radishes. Very good. It was very easy to distinguish between a piece of radish from a piece of turnip, when I expected them to be closer in taste and texture after cooking. But the turnips had softened whereas the turnips had kept some of their crunch. I will definitely cook radishes again. I'm sure they'd be great roasted in the oven, but it was 90°F outside today!

 

post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

I was quite proud of my idea of mixing mint with fennel, thinking they got together rather well, but my wife didn't like the result. Guess I won't be doing that again soon. Has anyone else tried that combination?

 

 

My wife is always pleasant and diplomatic when presented with one of my "experiments" that has gone awry.

 

Never tried fennel and mint.  Love fennel, would like to see it as a challenge theme someday.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #3 of 9

You've gone quite root happy here FF, a lovely experiment.  I've never tried cooking radishes before, they're not on my "favorites" list so I don't think of them often.  Mostly I enjoy radishes in salads and shaved thinly and placed delicately on top of buttered bread. I haven't tried adding mint to fennel but I can imagine it's very good.  Food for thought :)

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #4 of 9
They are just heavenly when roasted. All bitterness / bite is lost and they take on somewhat of a mild flavour . For the most part , roasted radishes retain much of its juices.
They also add color to a dish and are inexpensive / easy to grow just about anywhere.

I enjoy cooking shallots on the BBQ, they too take on a nice flavour , basted with olive oil and s & p.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #5 of 9

FF, I posted a dish using -what is called in French- a "poêlée" of vegetables, including radishes only a few weeks ago. Nothing new, but highly recommended for those who never did that before.

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/69652/what-did-you-have-for-dinner/2970#post_461018

post #6 of 9

Forgot about the fennel. Not many people like raw fennel, unless it's ultra-finely sliced like on a mandolin.

But if you're looking for instant success with fennel, also eaten by children, try this;

 

Fennel braised in orange juice;

Slice the bulbs in small segments and be sure there's always a bit of the core left which will keep the segments together.

Panfry in butter until some coloration. Add s&p and fresh orange juice (about a finger high). Cover and let simmer until the fennel is soft. Remove the cover, turn the heat up, add a sprinkle of sugar, a small squeeze of lemon juice and let fry until all liquid is gone and the fennel starts to caramelize nicely. Should look like this;

 

Fennel braised in orange juice

post #7 of 9

In the September, October time frame when the weather in the northern hemisphere starts sliding into winter, I think braising would be a good challenge theme.  That braised fennel looks REALLY good!

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #8 of 9

I pickled radishes a few years ago, they were okay and for most people it was either okay or this is nasty, about a 50/50 split...

post #9 of 9

From a chemical viewpoint, it is quite similar to cooking onions or garlic - the mustard oils that give it the sharpness are converted to something more harmless and the underlying sugar tastes come out or turn into caramelized flavours, depending on the preparation. I like it. Often use some radishes in stir fries.

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