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Question on Chermoula - with a twist

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I've made chermoula previously and used it with seafood.  Cilantro, parsley, paprika, lemon, cumin, etc. etc.  Is there an Asian equivalent for chermoula?  Has anyone tried some combinations - what worked?  what didn't work??  Maybe lemongrass?  garlic?  ginger? cilantro? Any thoughts/suggestions??  Thank you.

post #2 of 11

Chermoula is basically highly spiced acidic marinade.  

 

You could use many variations of Thai Curry Pastes as a marinade by adding some extra liquid likely salted cooking wine.

 

Indian Tandoori Marinades & Afghan Onion & Yougurt marinades are an option.

 

Chinese marinades are mostly made up from shelf stable items designed to eliminate pungent meat smells cantonese style or to completely blow your mind schezuan nam-pla, hot chiles and numbing prickly ash.  

 

Japanese marinades generally enhance Unami using miso bases and fresh herbs, tubers and fairly light on spices.

 

Korean marinades generally fermented notes, with lots of warm chili's and umami boosters.

 

Philipeno Adobes use vinegar, sugar, soy and coconut and bay for tenderizing.

 

Escabeche - vinegar, onions, herbs and spices.

 

Is there something more specific - it's kind of a huge topic?  Any particular countries that interest you, Asia is a very diverse place.  Any particular protein?


Edited by MichaelGA - 4/8/14 at 9:33pm

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post
 

Chermoula is basically highly spiced acidic marinade.  

Chermoula is a little more than a marinade. It's often served along with the protein, or on top of the protein.

post #4 of 11

True... but so are many marinades, you just reserve some before adding the un-cooked protein or cook the marinade along with the protein.   Marinades generally don't penetrate very far into the protein so you kind of have to include some in the final dish... or you loose most of the flavour.

 

Either way - I started typing the list and then realized that I might be typing for a day or two.  Thus the sudden question of where are we going with this?

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Michael - thank you for the detailed response.  In the past, I've use chermoula as a marinade for salmon and then had the salmon grilled.  So rather than using a conventional marinade from another culture, I am trying to figure out if I can use the same principles of chermoula, but with more Asian-flavored ingredients.

 

For example - in Indian cuisine there is a mint-cilantro chutney, which I have made several times in the past.  So maybe start out with cilantro and mint.  Cut down on the amount of green chile.  In place of lime juice in the chutney, add some tamarind extract for the sweet-sour component.  Some fresh ginger and garlic.  Maybe a teaspoon of garam masala for flavor.  Use some peanut oil and some coconut cream as the liquids.  And of course salt to taste.  Marinade fish or shrimp and then grill....or even cook in a pan over low-medium heat.

post #6 of 11

Ok... I think I get it now, but not sure...

 

Post your Chermoula recipe.

 

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For now I'll use what you already posted even though incomplete.

 

Cilantro, - citrusy, green fresh flavour, (super tasters might find it soapy) - Lemon Basil, Verbena

parsley, - fresh green, grassy, distinct - Lemon Grass Leaves, Perela leaf, wheat grass

paprika, - smokey, earthy, dry - dried or smoked mild chili's, fermented dried black beans, fermented chili's

lemon, - bright, acidic, juicy - rice wine vinegar, sweetened vinegar or various blends of citrus and zests

cumin, - earthy, basic, complex - epazote, sage, bay leaf maybe allspice

etc. etc.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Michael - the inspiration for the chermoula comes from the following link:

 

http://gardenamateur.blogspot.com/2010/05/chermoula.html

 

However, I modify the recipe as follows:

 

2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped  Double this amount
1/2 teaspoon salt  Also adjust as needed
3 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley
3 tablespoons chopped coriander (cilantro)  Also include tender stalks chopped fine
2 teaspoons paprika  1tsp paprika + 2 tsps low-heat but bright colored Indian chili powder
2 teaspoons ground cumin  3 tsp of cumin
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper  1tsp crushed dried hot red chilies from Asian store
1 tablespoon lemon juice  Adjust as needed.  Also add zest of one lemon
2 tablespoons olive oil  Adjust for consistency 
1 tbsp of honey or Agave nectar
1 to 2 tbsp of store-bought harrissa paste in a tube
 
post #8 of 11

So basically you're looking for an Asian marinade?

 

Here's what I typically use: 

- Coconut milk

- Shallots/Scallions

- Ginger

- Garlic

- Crushed coriander seeds

- Turmeric

- Palm sugar

- Cilantro (leaves+stalks+roots)/Lemongrass/Mint/Parsley/Thai basil...

- Fish sauce/Soy sauce/Shrimp paste

- Toasted sesame oil

 

That is my go to Thai marinade for BBQ chicken but I'm sure it'd work equally well for pork or fish...

 

   


Edited by French Fries - 4/9/14 at 3:17pm
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

So basically you're looking for an Asian marinade?

 

Here's what I typically use: 

- Coconut milk

- Shallots/Scallions

- Ginger

- Garlic

- Crushed coriander seeds

- Turmeric

- Palm sugar

- Cilantro (leaves+stalks+roots)/Lemongrass/Mint/Parsley/Thai basil...

- Fish sauce/Soy sauce/Shrimp paste

- Toasted sesame oil

 

That is my go to Thai marinade for BBQ chicken but I'm sure it'd work equally well for pork or fish...

 

Looks fantastic!

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you French Fries.

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post
 

 

Looks fantastic!

Thanks Michael!

Quote:
Originally Posted by AZFoodie View Post
 

Thank you French Fries.

You're welcome!

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