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Wusthof's new XLine versus Classic Ikon?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Wusthof's latest line of knives called XLine won a 2013 Red Dot award http://red-dot.de/pd/online-exhibition/work/?lang=en&code=2013-04-0423&y=2013&c=181&a=0 and appears to be their most expensive top-of-the-line knives, however, I haven't been able to find a single review.

 

Does anyone know anything about this new line and how it compares to Wusthof's Classic Ikon knives? 

post #2 of 18
Innovative design: don't worry, it still has the characteristic fat belly and high tip. Will work fine with very tall rock-chopping guys behind too low a counter.
A ceramic layer has been applied on the blades' faces. Just curious how it will look after a thinning session.
post #3 of 18
Verification on the German site shows the ceramic layer has already been abandoned.

http://www.wuesthof.com/deutschland/produkte/sortiment/messer/xline/9600-641
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

Innovative design: don't worry, it still has the characteristic fat belly and high tip. Will work fine with very tall rock-chopping guys behind too low a counter.
A ceramic layer has been applied on the blades' faces. Just curious how it will look after a thinning session.

 

 

Love the image of your very tall rock-chopping guy and low counter!  

 

After much (but clearly not enough) research, I ordered last week some Classic Ikon knives.  I haven't received them yet and today I happened to come across the XLine so I ordered one to see how it compares. 

 

Alas, that won't tell me how well their "newly developed transparent ceramic coating [which] gives the blade even more robustness" will last.

 

And now I'm wondering about your "fat belly and high tip" comment.  Are you not a fan of Wusthof knives?

post #5 of 18
I would prefer a lower tip, less belly, harder steel, blade heavy balance instead of handle heavy balance, lighter handles, lighter bolster, no fingerguard. Otherwise I would like them a lot.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

Verification on the German site shows the ceramic layer has already been abandoned.

http://www.wuesthof.com/deutschland/produkte/sortiment/messer/xline/9600-641

 

But it's still included in theindividual knife descriptions:  "New transparent ceramic coating on the blade" and "Neu entwickelte, transparente Keramikbeschichtung der Klingen:"

 

Makes you wonder what's going on....

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

Benuser, which knives do you like?

post #8 of 18
Japanese carbons with Western handles, vintage sabatiers and Sheffields: traditional French profile, slightly blade heavy, flat section perhaps. Misono, Hiromoto, Fujiwara. Simple basic stuff. Easy sharpening and tweaking is very important to me. See e.g. the Wüsthof carbon bicentenary blade!
post #9 of 18

Most of the people who participate here prefer more French or Japanese blade profiles. Flatter, lower point as mentioned above. Brand wise this means some of the Sabatiers for French profile, and from Japan, many different ones from Mac, Misono, Masamoto, Kikuchi and many more. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks -- I will definitely take a closer look at your recommendations.  Alternatively, I could just raid my mother's Sabatier collection which she seldom uses....

post #11 of 18

If you like the high belly knives, that's OK too. It is individual preference. Try out the different styles and see what you like. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #12 of 18
To explain what happened with these different profiles: all are derived from the Sabatier Chef's knife, end 19th century. That model has been adopted by all makers, with just very minor differences: no others have adopted the flat section between heel and halfway the blade, the Sheffields kept their arrow-like tip. When the Japanese went into the market they basically adopted French profile as well. They've changed a lot -- using harder steels, thinner blades, ignoring left-handed and increasing asymmetry -- but the profile has remained the same, with a slightly lower tip, perhaps.
The modern German profile is in fact a recent development. Pre-war German blades had basically the same profile as the French or English. The high tip -- almost in-line with the spine -- and the resulting fat belly must have to do with easier mass production.
For the others: the French have never changed anything to the profile, the Sheffield quality cutlery has simply disappeared.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 

Great advice, phatch, though it's a tad hard since I don't have good knife stores anywhere nearby, and I hate to keep ordering and returning.   And I may have prematurely ruled out Japanese knives because I'm left handed but I'm going to give them a closer look.  Thanks again!

post #14 of 18
Masahiro Virgin Carbons are available for left-handed. No simple neutral edge, as most resellers offer, but an entirely adapted grinding: left face convex, with Kanji, right face basically flat. Premium some 30% above the right-handed version.
post #15 of 18
http://www.knifemerchant.com/product.asp?productID=5874

If you happened to live outside of the US, japanesechefsknife.com carry them as well without mentioning in their catalogue, though. Ask Mr Iwahara, koki@kencrest.us
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks, Benuser!  I'd also ruled out new Sabatier knives because I thought they were being made in China.  But I see now the real ones are still made in France.  Dieu merci!

post #17 of 18
post #18 of 18
My friend bought one of the xline bread knives. Interesting serarations on it. I can't imagine it will be easy to sharpen. I'll try and find a pic.
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