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Enchilada Sauce

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I have not made enchiladas for our Wednesday night fellowship meal before and was wanting an enchilada sauce or suggestions on the one I use at home. I was wondering if any of the spices might become overpowering when I multiplied it.  Planning on making about a gallon and half of sauce.

     

     ENCHILADA SAUCE
4 tablespoon vegetable oil
4 tablespoon flour, all-purpose
1 teaspoon cumin, ground
4 tablespoon chili powder
2 can tomato sauce (8 oz)
4 cup water
2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 cup salsa
 

post #2 of 12

@wlong it doesn't have to be tomato based... what about using green chile sauce instead? just sub the tomato sauce for a can of green chiles, like ortega, a mild chile, give em a wiz in the blender... that's a winner at our house

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks Kaneohegrilinaz, I will give that a try. This meal is several weeks away, getting an early start on the sauce.

post #4 of 12
When I do enchilada sauce, I don't use roux and I don't add water. It is tomato sauce, Chile sauce made from rehydrated and pureed dried chiles, paprika, cumin, coriander, real garlic, salt and pepper. The roux and water is essentially just "filler". It brings nothing to the sauce in my opinion and dilutes the tomato and chili flavors.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks Brandon, I will try that out.

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post
 

@wlong it doesn't have to be tomato based... what about using green chile sauce instead? just sub the tomato sauce for a can of green chiles, like ortega, a mild chile, give em a wiz in the blender... that's a winner at our house


Yes I think that this would give it a good flavor.  Green chiles are one of my favorites.

post #7 of 12

We have a few recipes for New Mexico Green Chile Sauce (green enchilada sauce). Here's one:

 

Makes about 1 quart

 

2 Tablespoons lard (or vegetable or canola oil)

1/4 medium white onion, finely diced

3 medium cloves garlic, minced

2 Tablespoons all purpose flour

8 medium-sized New Mexico #6 or Big Jim chiles, roasted, peeled, seeded and

        finely chopped (about 1 pound or 2 cups) (or a 13-ounce container frozen

        diced         green chiles) (or 3 4-ounce cans of diced green chiles)

1 1/2 cups good water (or low-sodium chicken or pork stock)

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt (omit if your stock is not low-sodium)

1/2 - 1 pound shredded pork or beef (optional)

 

Step 1:

In a heavy bottomed skillet over medium heat, heat the lard until it is shimmering but not yet smoking. Sauté the onion until it has softened and become translucent, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and stir until it is nice and fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the flour and mix it in well, stirring constantly for at least 2 minutes to cook out the flour-y taste.

 

Step 2:

Add in the green chiles, water (or stock), and salt and simmer the sauce uncovered, stirring often for 20 minutes, until most of the liquid has evaporated and the sauce has thickened slightly.

 

Step 3:

In a blender or food processor or using an immersion blender, blend the sauce to your desired consistency. If using, add the shredded pork or beef.

 

 

 

post #8 of 12

Enchilada sauces means in chiles. The tomatoes are usually just liquid for the dried chiles. Certainly, a roasted fresh chile sauce would be good too.  A local mexican joint offers an entomatada sauce of green chiles and tomatillos that's quite good and different from the common red chile sauce of most enchiladas. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for your input.  In the near future I will try your methods at home. I personally like the green sauce better, but I have to watch the cost and it is more expensive.  I decided to try a recipe from America Test Kitchen, Red Chili Sauce Chicken Enchiladas.  We had it last night and it is a descent tasting recipe. So this Wednesday afternoon I guess I will be rolling along :roll:

post #10 of 12

Would someone be willing to share how to make the sauce using the dehydrated chillis. I live in Texas and they are all in our stores but I can't find a Enchilada Sauce or a Chili Gravy for tamales explaining how to do it. Thanks for any help you can provide.

post #11 of 12
I am serious about my cheese enchiladas.
Fiesta brand has a product on the market that is hands down the best chile gravy I have ever used at home.
I won't say it is the best when compared with one that uses all fresh ingredients and takes days to prepare but it is easy to use as well as quick when you need enchiladas NOW!!!!

You just "fry" it briefly in a bit of oil then add water and whisk like crazy until thick and lump free.
So perfectly balanced that if you close your eyes you can imagine you are having an enchilada plate at Rosie's Tamale House in Austin!
Only thing missing is Willie and entourage taking up all the tables in the back lol!

Check WalMart and HEB and give it a try......you will not be disappointed.

mimi
post #12 of 12

Welcome pkowis

 

To use the dried chiles you need to rehydrate them first. Sorry I can't really give you any measurements here. There are so many kinds and sizes. It freezes well if you end up with too much.

 

Break the stem off the chiles. Shake out what seeds you can. You don't have to get them all out now.

 

Completely cover in hot water and let sit until soft. (about an hour?) They want to float so weigh them with a plate if needed. Then split and peel out any seeds and the ribs if desired. Carefully scrape the flesh off of the skins.

 

Some people toast them first and then add water and simmer until soft, blend them and strain out the bits of skin and seeds. You have to add a lot of water this way though, that's why i scrape.

 

Now you can use this for sauce, mole, posole or add to chili.

 

For sauce add whatever you want now. Toast your spices (Usually cumin, I add coriander) then sautee an onion and a couple cloves of garlic in same pan. Add flour if desired (You don't need it if you used the scrape method) and cook for a few minutes. You can add tomato or tomatilla (fresh, stewed, roasted or sauce) and Mexican oregano. Blend until smooth and cook down to desired consistency.If you used the scrape method you will probably have to add some water to get it to blend.

 

Here's a few links to basic recipes.

 

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/05/red-enchilada-sauce-how-to-make-mexican-recipe.html

 

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/ancho-guajillo-chile-sauce-108061

 
 
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