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Zucchini

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Not creative in and of itself, but an observation that might valuable:

I am guessing that most of us has seen this, cutting up a buch of zucchini for whatever kind of prep. You stack them in a container (raw) until you want to use them. Low and behold, your slices have (in some cases) stuck together. Sometimes really solidly.

Anybody know what causes this? I have been looking online for an answer but have come up empty. This could be something to be exploited, if this effect could be exagerated and controlled.

Al
post #2 of 7

Water and air pressure. Suction effectively.

 

The cut zuke weeps liquid, mostly water into the space between the slice. This forces the air in there out. When you go to separate it, the air pressure (14 pounds/square inch) pushes them together and the water between them keeps air from slipping in and helping you free them up. 

 

But the slices will slide sideways freely. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 7

My guess is that effect is attributable to pectin ( whch is used by some industries as a vegetable glue ) which is present in zucchini.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Phatch, so you attribute this to a physical action rather than a chemical? Interesting, and logical.
post #5 of 7

It could be a bit of both. Suction between slices, or water and sugar content and pectin

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

Water and air pressure. Suction effectively.

 

The cut zuke weeps liquid, mostly water into the space between the slice. This forces the air in there out. When you go to separate it, the air pressure (14 pounds/square inch) pushes them together and the water between them keeps air from slipping in and helping you free them up. 

 

But the slices will slide sideways freely. 

Absolutely, exactly the science.

 

Classic Physics 101 experiment:

 

Two small pieces of flat glass, put them together and you will have no problem pulling them apart.

Put a little drop of water between them and you will not be able to pull them apart.

 

It's the reason for the dimples on knives.

 

Also take a look on youtube on how people can climb up buildings using suction cups, it's possible because of air pressure.

 

dcarch

post #7 of 7

This is interesting. Allan, have you tried exaggerating this with a vacuum seal? I've never personally seen this happen but that is because I tend to prep my zucchini very soon before I use it. Cheflayne is right, zucchini has what I read to be very high levels of natural pectin, I wonder if it is a combination of effects?