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Sous vide in restaurant kitchens - Page 2

post #31 of 50

Thanks P .... the home canning analogy was perfect as that is something I understand and can relate to.

I knew the answer had to be simple but just couldn't suss it out.

So much of what is out there in blogs (and personal opinion FAQ's) is not trustworthy IMO.

Trying to make sense of the rest (gov rules and data) is near impossible to understand (and I have a degree in science lol).

 

So like home canned, high pH foods it is perfectly safe (unless of course I leave the item in the car during the middle of a Texas summer ;-)

 

Thanks again.....

mimi

post #32 of 50

Yeah, it's not shelf stable but it will keep a lot longer.  Once pasteurized you can keep it refridgerated for a month.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #33 of 50

CapeCodChef, you may want to look into Cvap machines and the advanced staging techniques as well.

I havent installed it yet, but I just bought a used warming cabinet to pre-stage burgers for a high volume operation.  

post #34 of 50
We plan to do 1/2 chickens for both a dish and ton pull for tacos, nachos and quesadilla, also planning on pork pabil(loin) and pastor(diced loin) for tacos and stuffed chicken breast
Could I sous vide all these items?
post #35 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chef scoots View Post

We plan to do 1/2 chickens for both a dish and ton pull for tacos, nachos and quesadilla, also planning on pork pabil(loin) and pastor(diced loin) for tacos and stuffed chicken breast
Could I sous vide all these items?

I don't see why not. I'm not sure about 1/2 chickens, generally with sous vide you want to take advantage of exact temps...since chicken white meat and dark meat are ideal at different temperatures, you might lose some of the benefit of sous vide if you cook them both together. I'm not saying its not possible, but one way or the other you'll be compromising. 

 

My suggestion would be to separate the two meats so you can take maximum advantage of the process. 

 

Pork loin should be excellent sous vide. Stuffed chicken breast would probably work, but depending on what you stuff it with you have to pay attention to pasteurization times and core temps with that. 

post #36 of 50


I am setting at Farmers Markets and I want to sell the sous vide steaks. Can I sell them frozen and the customer will thaw them and sear them before eating them?

post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by peristeri62 View Post
 


I am setting at Farmers Markets and I want to sell the sous vide steaks. Can I sell them frozen and the customer will thaw them and sear them before eating them?

 

You want to sell already cooked sous vide steaks?? 

 

I don't know about that. Have you done research enough to know that you wouldn't be breaking any laws or anything by doing it? Even with home stead laws and all that, you might run into problems with the health department if you try and sell stuff. Most health departments don't like vacuum bags, especially from places that aren't commercial food prepare facilities. 

 

I guess I don't understand why you would sell already cooked steaks to someone. You have to trust that when they reheat it they aren't going to overcook it in the pan...

 

I dunno, seems...like a messy idea. 

post #38 of 50

I don't know the laws of KY.  Here in MN you'd need a HACCP plan for the circulator and the vacuum sealer, not sure about selling them off site.  But as long as the legalities are sussed out there's no reason it couldn't work.  Personally I'd rather sous vide them and chill them, selling them chilled but not frozen.  I think the quality would be better. But it would work okay to freeze them if necessary.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #39 of 50

That is all true, but what about reheating them for whomever buys them? The point of sous vide is obviously to get really precise cooking, if we are trusting home cooks to properly reheat a sous vide steak by using a pan what is the point?

post #40 of 50

Well, obviously one won't get the best results at home without any equipment. But it can still be useful to retherm an home that was cooked sous vide.  One example would be flank steak; one could sous vide it off site for eight hours @ 130 to pasteurize it and to make it extremely tender, then retherm it in any way you like at home and get a nice tender piece of steak.  Tougher cuts are better suited to this notion than something like a filet or ribeye.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by peristeri62 View Post
 


I am setting at Farmers Markets and I want to sell the sous vide steaks. Can I sell them frozen and the customer will thaw them and sear them before eating them?


The majority of regular FM customers in my area are busy professionals who IMO would find this attractive.

They are career driven and work long hours (and order takeout most of the time).

So they are hitting the FMs in order to pick up a few ingredients for weekend dinners.

Don't know if they would want to pay too much of an upcharge tho.

Have you surveyed your regulars re this potential new product and the higher price tag?

Have you figured out if this would be worth the extra time and effort (not to mention the cost of equipment and bagging materials?)

 

mimi

post #42 of 50

When I was interning at Restaurant Alto in Caracas, Venezuela, I was introduced to sous vide.

I sous vide Mango for a creamy mango gel, sweet chilies with garlic and coriander root to make savory chili pastes. Cassava and Milk to make a very messy to make, but delicious puree.
We seared magret, cooled and sous vide at 110º C and then shredded the meat for a delicious magret confit in rum and coffee sauce. We sous vide snapper fillet and finished them off on the flat top.

Baby onions confit in brown sugar. One of the messiest and most aromatic preparations was the egg sac of the llisa fish sous vide with garlic, coriander root, sweet chilies, and olive oil. It was then passed through a sieve and mixed with sweet chili paste.

 

Sous vide cooking is definitely innovative, it may not work for everything but it does work for some things. From moisture retention to absolute temperature control or the ability to have 30-40 proteins ready for service, I think sous vide cooking is here to stay.

 

post #43 of 50


Mimi, I am still in the process of doing what you just said; checking the high cost, the equipment and my market. My first big farmers market is the 14th May, I will ask my regulars and go from there.

Thanks

post #44 of 50


Checking and testing all legal ways. I will post later

post #45 of 50

Hi everyone.

I am diving into a new endevour, and if anyone is willing, please share your best practicies, in order for me not to drawn.

Couple of words about me- 18 years in the cruise line industry, last 5 working as a Maitre'd, on the rivers in Europe. Never worked as a chef though. Settling back on land, I found really good offer to rent a fully equipped restaurant with high end equipment including professional sous vide machine and vaccuum machine.

 Now, planning strategies, making recipies with Chefs- friends from the cruise lines, it looks like noone really knows much about sous vide, and its practical usage. Skilled stuff is very hard to find back home. Ignorance and low professional standards are like plague- everywhere. There are only couple of restaurants I can go, and meet part of my expectations. I've been reading and reading about sous vide, and I find it great way to start the business, but you can't practically think of everything. Things gonna pop up all the way through the journey.

My question is- How practical is for example to cook lets's say 10 kilos of chicken breasts via sous vide and use it for whatever needs- pasta, grilled chicken breast, some asian style chicken, etc. The overproduction will be chilled and refrigerated used later on for lunch pot dishes, and cold salads. How far I gonna be from the original recepie making chicken adobo or chicken satay, or fried chicken nuggets or anything, just finishing the sous vide product, with the corresponding sous, or technique? Also- what are the juices from the bag best for?

Thank you all.

post #46 of 50
@thepot welcome to Chef Talk !
The archives are full of great discussions on your topic.
Try digging thru those and then if you need to clarify start a new thread.
Sometimes questions get swallowed up when tacked onto an older discussion.

mimi
post #47 of 50
When I got started with sous vide, I was just experimenting & ended up building my own DIY machine. Below are some details of how I did it.

I took my existing stainless steel warm bain marie and used aquarium filters and digital thermometers as cut off devices.

Using an aquarium impeller with a temperature probe was just about $300 for 1000 gallons of water circulation per hour and a thermostat cost about $45. This can let you substitute an immersion device at a fraction of a cost.

Do note: the thermostat controls the heat range and water circulation is on throughout. Better the water circulation, better the results and uniformity of cooking.

I hope this helps someone looking to get started with sous vide!
post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by manavatmix View Post

When I got started with sous vide, I was just experimenting & ended up building my own DIY machine. Below are some details of how I did it.

I took my existing stainless steel warm bain marie and used aquarium filters and digital thermometers as cut off devices.

Using an aquarium impeller with a temperature probe was just about $300 for 1000 gallons of water circulation per hour and a thermostat cost about $45. This can let you substitute an immersion device at a fraction of a cost.

Do note: the thermostat controls the heat range and water circulation is on throughout. Better the water circulation, better the results and uniformity of cooking.

I hope this helps someone looking to get started with sous vide!

 

You can get circulators for under $200 now, I don't really see the benefit of building your own. 

post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by manavatmix View Post

When I got started with sous vide, I was just experimenting & ended up building my own DIY machine. Below are some details of how I did it.

I took my existing stainless steel warm bain marie and used aquarium filters and digital thermometers as cut off devices.

Using an aquarium impeller with a temperature probe was just about $300 for 1000 gallons of water circulation per hour and a thermostat cost about $45. This can let you substitute an immersion device at a fraction of a cost.

Do note: the thermostat controls the heat range and water circulation is on throughout. Better the water circulation, better the results and uniformity of cooking.

I hope this helps someone looking to get started with sous vide!

That is a way to get started, but sounds like - uh, no. I started with a beer box and a silicon hot water bottle at 90c. It kept 65c for about four hours within 1 degree difference. Kicking it from time to time to make waves...

post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaminute View Post

We've done petite filets sous vide at my place for years. First we clean and portion the steaks and then put the raw meat in the vacuum bag -4 10 oz portions per bag- with a little butter, thyme and garlic for aromatics. Then drop two to four bags in your bath at a time at 117 degrees f for at least an hour before pick up- longer is better as it will help break the meat down slightly. To pick up, open the bag one at a time and season and sear your steaks. Since the steaks are already 117 degrees when you start, after the seat they reach an internal temp of around135-140 or a nice rare steak. Then it only takes a minute in the oven for mr, two for medium and about three for mid well. The steaks are better because they've been slowly cooked essentially in aromatics before being pushed to the exact temp. Gauge how many steaks you'll use depending on the night and never try to put more than four bags or so in at once. As you pull some just cycle more in behind as you feel you'll need. At the end of service simply place any remaining bags in an ice bath- they will be safe to reheat the same way at least once and as long as you watch how many bags you drop you should never have to reheat more than once.

 

 hi, like the way you cook the filets. Just want to ask

how long meat can sous vide in 117 degree? is 12 hours going to be ok?

"takes a minute in the oven for mr, two for medium and about three for mid well." Can  I ask how hot is the oven? for me it seem cooking very quick.

 Thanks

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