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How to make 100% whole wheat bread as fluffy as white bread?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone,

 

I like 100% whole wheat bread and have made it several times, somehow I just can't make it fluffy as white bread. Ingredients I use include 100% whole wheat flour (2 cups), instant yeast (1 table spoon), baking powder (1 tsp), honey, warm water.

 

Could someone please provide some tips as to how to make 100% whole wheat bread fluffy. Is it possible to do it with the aide of shortening or butter? Please share your recipes with the rest of us.

 

Thank you in advance!

 

Eric

post #2 of 22

It won't. One, the gluten concentration is lower. Further, the whole grain part actually cuts the gluten as it forms, further diminishing the effect of the gluten. The bran and its hydration properties also make for a denser effect in the bread. 

 

100% whole wheat is what it is. It's not a light fluffy loaf. 

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post #3 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

It won't. One, the gluten concentration is lower. Further, the whole grain part actually cuts the gluten as it forms, further diminishing the effect of the gluten. The bran and its hydration properties also make for a denser effect in the bread. 

 

100% whole wheat is what it is. It's not a light fluffy loaf. 

Agreed the only way I know of to make a lighter loaf is to mix it with bread or AP flour which is what I do for a honey wheat loaf, I just haven't figured out how to really bring out the honey flavor without having to add a ton of honey

post #4 of 22

Adding a little oil and also some dry milk powder will help to tenderize a whole wheat bread some.

However, you are comparing apples to oranges. 

As others have stated, there just is not as much gluten to develop in WW flour as in white flour.

Unless you add some white hi-gluten flour to your dough, you'll still end up with a coarser, denser bread.

 

Many of us like that though. 

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post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for your replies.

 

I guess the reason the bread in this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XIs5EVXJ6Q) is fluffy is because she added AP flour.

 

Also, could someone tell me what is the best temperature to bake at and baking time for what size of loaf please.

 

Thanks!

post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricDunn View Post

...Also, could someone tell me what is the best temperature to bake at and baking time for what size of loaf please.

 

Thanks!

My dough weighs approx 1250 grams.  I place it into an oven preheated to 500F (it won't go any higher and if I could I'd preheat the oven to 550F).  After 10 minutes the temperature is reduced to 450F.  Total bake time is 40 minutes.

 

AP flour           725g

Bread Flower   125g

Water             510g  (this works out to 60% hydration)

Diastatic Malt  1/2 tsp

Salt                3 TBS

Yeast              <1/4 tsp for 18 hour rise,     1/4 tsp for 12 hour rise

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post #7 of 22

Agreed with all the above comments. I'd also like to mention though that it's worth investing in a bread stone. I got a plain terracotta tile from a diy shop for a fiver and it makes a massive difference. I tend to bake 'open' bread like baguettes and pan loaves, but I feel confident a bread stone will increase your oven spring (rise in the oven) too. Just a cautionary note - don't buy tiles that are lacquered, the finish has lead in them and I'm pretty sure you don't want that in your bread. ;)

post #8 of 22

+1 for a bread stone.  Fibrament is what I use in my oven and get a rectangular one (not round) that will almost occupy your oven rack in its entirety.

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post #9 of 22

One consideration on stones is to ensure that sufficient circulation still occurs in the oven.  I opted for a round stone since it allows better circulation than rectangular stone.

post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

One consideration on stones is to ensure that sufficient circulation still occurs in the oven.  I opted for a round stone since it allows better circulation than rectangular stone.


I disagree.  My rectangular stone is at least 2" shorter than the oven walls and I've had no problem with breadbaking circulation and getting a good oven spring.  And a rectangular stone offers more surface area for baking than a circular one.


Edited by kokopuffs - 4/28/14 at 1:25pm

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 


I disagree.  bla bla.

Disagree all you'd like... but what are you disagreeing with?  I gave my opinion based on my experience.  You can't tell me that I'm wrong.  Rectangle is good for you and your oven; I'm happy.  It wasn't for me and the additional baking surface is not an issue for me.  I'm simply pointing out that other folks should think of htat consideration prior to choosing a baking stone.

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

Disagree all you'd like... yada yada yada and bla bla bla all you'd like.

 

Up to now I haven't heard anything concerning a circular stone allowing better circulation than a rectangular one.  And a rectangular one allows for 25% more baking surface.  Alright, move on.


Edited by kokopuffs - 4/28/14 at 4:08pm

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

Up to now I haven't heard anything concerning a circular stone allowing better circulation than a rectangular one.  And a rectangular one allows for 25% more baking surface.  Alright, move on.

Well, here's how it worked. For me; your experience seems different. Gas oven. Gas needs air to burn properly. Small oven with big rectangle stone smothered the gas flame. Inadequate heating and carbom monoxide from bad burnis not good. Smaller rectangle stone might have been as food as smaller rectangle stone but I chose round. Not much of a difference to me. I don't need 25 pct more stone floor. Let's not get emotional or dismissive about it... We have different experience. Neither one of us needs to be more right than the other. OK?
Edited by BrianShaw - 4/28/14 at 8:06pm
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

...Gas oven. Gas needs air to burn properly. Small oven with big rectangle stone smothered the gas flame. Inadequate heating and carbom monoxide from bad burnis not good.....

 

Checkout the website I cited for Fibrament.  They state to allow for 1 or 2 inches of free space between the stone and the oven's walls to allow for proper circulation.

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-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #15 of 22

Wonderful... so we agree.  Circulation in the oven is important.  That's great!  You use rectangle; I use round... whatever works for each of us is all that really matters.

 

I know the Fibrament line of products quite well.  I also know the OldStone line, and the Forno Bravo products.  There are many good options for baking stones.

 

Re: the topic of the thread... I've found that 50-50 whole and white flour can make a fluffy loaf but it is rarely as fluffy as 100? white flour.

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

Re: the topic of the thread... I've found that 50-50 whole and white flour can make a fluffy loaf but it is rarely as fluffy as 100? white flour.

...and a rectangular breadstone will make for a better loaf.  That's for sure.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #17 of 22

Koko, not wanting to wind you up, just wondering why it is that you are having such a hard time accepting that someone else has had a different experience to you. I use a square stone which is fine. There are numerous factors, gas vs electric, relative humidity of the environment, shapes of stone, types of stone. It just seems like you're being intolerant of someones different experience and I can't understand why.

 

As I said, I'm not trying to annoy you, I've seen many useful comments from you on here and respect your opinion greatly, I just can't understand why you're so adamant that a rectangular stone is THE one to use.

post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartScholes View Post
 

Koko, not wanting to wind you up, just wondering why it is that you are having such a hard time accepting that someone else has had a different experience to you. I use a square stone which is fine. There are numerous factors, gas vs electric, relative humidity of the environment, shapes of stone, types of stone. It just seems like you're being intolerant of someones different experience and I can't understand why.

 

As I said, I'm not trying to annoy you, I've seen many useful comments from you on here and respect your opinion greatly, I just can't understand why you're so adamant that a rectangular stone is THE one to use.


BrianShaw wanted to pick an argument and so I accomodated him.  As stated previously, let's move on.  And my post that's listed just before yours, don't take it seriously.

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-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #19 of 22

Fair enough, just wondered. :)

post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartScholes View Post
 

Fair enough, just wondered. :)


THX!   I'm glad some here can take a joke.   :roll:

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 


BrianShaw wanted to pick an argument and so I accomodated him.  As stated previously, let's move on.  And my post that's listed just before yours, don't take it seriously.

No, I simply expressed my experience.  Notice, I never disagreed with you except for MY preference for a round stone vs a rectangular based on MY experience.  But since you have decided to go public with your eye-poking... you seem to be the one who gets argumentative more than most others onthis forum.  What a joke you can be at times.  Take your own advise and "move on".  I have no problem with you, your opinions, or your postings.  Move on.

post #22 of 22

Let it go gentlemen. 

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