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Cooking Chilling & Slicing Meats

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I work in a hospital kitchen and the cooks roast the meat and cool it the day before service.  Then the day of they slice it then reheat it which destroys the quality of the product.  Is there a better method to be able cook and serve for example a bottom round, or eye of round cut of meat.

post #2 of 12
You should look into getting an alto shaam.
post #3 of 12

Can you not roast, rest and slice the day of? Like doing a prime rib? I agree that roasting, chilling and slicing/reheating is not the way to go for anything resembling quality produce...unless you are making roast beef sandwiches of course. 

 

But, why can't you/they roast the day of then hold warm and slice?

post #4 of 12

Unless you are a restaurant that serves roast beef right off the cutting board it is best to chill then slice.

 

This is because beef roasts, cooked the same day and placed on a slicer do not give you the nice slices that you need for service. The meat falls all over the place and a lot of the meat falls in between the slicing blade and the fender of the machine.

 

The meat is best sliced cold because most of the fat can be removed easier, as it is more visible (as in white) when cooled.

 

As good compromise could be to allow the roast to set out for up to 2 hours after cooking then slice, but the meat will still have to be reheated,

post #5 of 12

I was under the impression that he meant something along the lines of a beef roast, like prime rib, where the roast is cut into steaks and served to guests. 

 

If it is something like roast beef for sandwiches to be sliced on a machine, then yes it should be cooked and chilled then sliced. If he is talking about roasting whole joints and slicing off "steaks," then I don't understand why you would cook/chill rather then just cook/serve. 

post #6 of 12
I want to be admitted into the hospital that has prime (even choice) beef ANYTHING on the menu lol.
The OP mentioned two cuts in his question and pretty sure there are no ribs nor steaks in the equation.
mit (can I call you that?) the reason for roasting the day before boils down to time and money.
Unless you have in place a nite cook (money) most prep including the cooking of large proteins and anything else that can be safely held for up to 24 hours has to be done in the relative calm between lunch and after supper clean up (time).
Your personnel comes in at what, 0430-0500?
First they have to bang out breakfast for patients as well as staff and visitors and even if they had the space to roast lunch starts a couple of hours later.
No time for a slow roast for a slightly tough cut.
Ergo if beef roast is on the menu, then prepping day before is the best option.
So have them slice cold (evening before if possible) and lay in hotel pan with a few inches of a killer jus on top, cover with foil and slam into the ovens after breakfast bacon and breads are already out on trays and dining room steam tables.
HTH.

mimi
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

I want to be admitted into the hospital that has prime (even choice) beef ANYTHING on the menu lol.
The OP mentioned two cuts in his question and pretty sure there are no ribs nor steaks in the equation.
mit (can I call you that?) the reason for roasting the day before boils down to time and money.
Unless you have in place a nite cook (money) most prep including the cooking of large proteins and anything else that can be safely held for up to 24 hours has to be done in the relative calm between lunch and after supper clean up (time).
Your personnel comes in at what, 0430-0500?
First they have to bang out breakfast for patients as well as staff and visitors and even if they had the space to roast lunch starts a couple of hours later.
No time for a slow roast for a slightly tough cut.
Ergo if beef roast is on the menu, then prepping day before is the best option.
So have them slice cold (evening before if possible) and lay in hotel pan with a few inches of a killer jus on top, cover with foil and slam into the ovens after breakfast bacon and breads are already out on trays and dining room steam tables.
HTH.

mimi

 

I didn't say prime grade beef, I said "like a prime rib" which is a standing rib roast that is typically roasted and carved to order. Now, I understand that a hospital is not likely to use even a rib roast, hence the term "like," meaning in the method of, or utilizing a similar roast/rest/slice/serve process, as one would use, for example, a standing rib roast, or "prime rib." 

 

So, a round of beef, cooked how you would cook a prime rib, rested and held, then sliced to order, might work in this instance. 

 

Now, if the OP could give some more specifics on space, personnel, etc in the kitchen, then we might be able to help more. I don't see why it wouldn't be possible to roast a top round/bottom round the day of and slice to order. Even a slow roast should still be possible. 

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have 3 cooks on 5a-1p 6a-2p 10a-6p the feedback I am getting from them is similar to Chefross's comment about waste and reduced quality from the slicer if the product is warm. We have the space,staff, several ovens, and 2 convection ovens and a Hobart slicer just limited options for for roasting and slicing large cuts. Unfortunately we don't have the labor to slice to order during meal service and we wouldn't yield consistent portion sizes unless we use the meat slicer. I will try to let the roasts settle then slice and work on improving our au jus and see if that increases the quality. I appreciate the feedback.
post #9 of 12

Are you thin slicing like sandwich meat or a thicker cut? How are you reheating? How many portions per service?

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post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thicker cuts about 1/4" reheating is done an hour before service in a convection oven. 2 pieces per order and 300 portions prepped.
post #11 of 12

I would agree that this kills quality. I think it would be a good idea for the CdC and sous to work on more efficient scheduling of ovens. I think it's inexcusable to do that. A day old roast is pretty much unacceptable in my book, except maybe an "end cut" of [rime rib that will be used the very next day.
Any roast beef except for the end cut should be made into sandwiches, given to the front of house for their staff meal. (Kitchen staff gets a better meal) donated to a great non-profit like Sharing Our Strength, or made into another form.

post #12 of 12

If I am reading correctly, you are producing 600 (1/4") slices for service. One person, slicing by hand, should be able to complete the task in 20 minutes working at a moderate pace. My suggestion would be to roast and slice on the day of service. Start slicing about 30 minutes before you begin plating. As you go, place slices in a hotel pan, cover with cellophane and foil and pop into a warming oven or a cambro. When plating time comes, you should be good to go.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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