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Locating nutrients in Broccoli ?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

It is said that broccoli is very good for you. Where are the most nutrients ? In the florets only ? Or in the stems too ?

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Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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post #2 of 13

You're using a loaded term, nutrients. Nutrients encompass a wide range of things: fiber, flavinoids, tocophenols and so on, not just vitamins and minerals. 

 

The stems are more fibrous, and fiber is an in important nutrient many people lack. Flowers get a lot of the plants energy and have a wide range of chemicals. Some are good for us, some aren't. Broccoli carries a fair amount of sulphur compounds. 

 

So what do you mean by nutrients?  Personally, I prefer the stems to the florets as far as flavor and texture go. It's one reason I like gai lan so much.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

by nutrient in broccoli I mean the "stuff" that makes it better than other vegetables. Is there more in the flower or in the stem?

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by berndy View Post
 

by nutrient in broccoli I mean the "stuff" that makes it better than other vegetables. Is there more in the flower or in the stem?

 

Oh, please, reread Patch's reply.

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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #5 of 13
Thats like asking which is more useful, your arms or your legs? It's all good just eat it ad don't think about it too much. Don't overcook it.

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 13

Try googling your question, Berndy, and I used to teach nutrition as part of my Health Science Class.

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-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

The stems are more fibrous, and fiber is an in important nutrient many people lack.

 

Going full biochemistry PhD nitpicking mode here, but fiber is not a nutrient as such, since it is not digested and used. Important, though, so you are technically right :)

post #8 of 13

Insoluble fiber more or less wipes "clean" the interior of the digestive tract.

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-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

Insoluble fiber more or less wipes "clean" the interior of the digestive tract.

Didn't say I had no use - just technical nitpicking. If it ain't digested, it ain't no nutrient. The value of fibre for gastrointestinal health is clear, as you say.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by berndy View Post
 

by nutrient in broccoli I mean the "stuff" that makes it better than other vegetables. Is there more in the flower or in the stem?


If I correctly recall from my days of teaching, the two foods having the widest range of nutrients (drum roll, please) are broccoli and mackerel.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #11 of 13

The Nutrition Panel for food in the US includes a spot for Dietary Fiber measured in grams under the Carbohydrates category.

 

Thus my thinking on fiber as a nutrient.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #12 of 13

To me a nutrient is a substance needed by the human body that it cannot manufacture on its own.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

To me a nutrient is a substance needed by the human body that it cannot manufacture on its own.

A bit problematic, to me. I mean, the body can manufactury the non-essential amino acids and fatty acids, for example, but it still appreciates getting them with the food. Anyway, my post above was really just nitpicking for the sake of it... ;)

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