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Would you eat a pink egg?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Just received an email with the following picture. I didn't read any of the text. I'd love for you to look at the picture and then describe what your reaction was? I have added my own reaction below the picture to avoid influencing you. 

 

 

My reaction? 

First, I thought the eggs were really pretty, and quite original looking. Visually striking, for sure. Could be great for the WoW factor at a brunch or cocktail party. 

Second, I pictured myself in front of that plate and realized, I didn't find the eggs appetizing. I find them pretty, but I'm not really keen on grabing one and lifting it up toward my mouth. 

Third I concluded that those could be fun for a Princess party for a Beverly Hills pre-teen or something, but that's about it.

 

Then I showed the photo to my wife. Her reaction?

First, she said "yeah they're cute". 

Second she said "doesn't really makes me want to eat them. Maybe for a pre-teen thinking she's a princess or something...?

 

I found it pretty amazing that both me and her had pretty much the same reaction!

 

What do you think??

post #2 of 29

I believe those are pickled eggs, and they might be dyed with beets. I remember seeing that exact picture somewhere and reading that, if memory serves me right. I'm used to pickled eggs by now, so they don't really shock me. I'd try them.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #3 of 29

First, kinda wondering if  both or either of you have RAISED a preteen who thinks she's a princess per chance?

Cuz I know --I-- have so I would be cheat-coding commenting on that part. :lol:

 

Second, while I've made such apps for parties and events, I'm personally not fond of eating

things that utilize a lot of dye to achieve a certain appearance, organic or not.

Never been crazy about black velvet desserts for similar reasons. 

 

BTW these are also popular at easter, in various colors--in fact there was just a thread on it about 3 or 4 weeks ago

post #4 of 29

No problem to me, since I've eaten these many times:

 

Google pic

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post
 

I believe those are pickled eggs, and they might be dyed with beets. I remember seeing that exact picture somewhere and reading that, if memory serves me right. I'm used to pickled eggs by now, so they don't really shock me. I'd try them.

Yes you are correct they were pickled in beet juice. They don't really shock me either, and they're no mystery either, I knew just by looking at it that they must have been some beet juice involved. I'd try them without any aversion. I just don't feel like they are screaming "I am super tasty and you should take a bite out of me right away". And somehow, and this may seem weird, but somehow they look overcooked to me. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Meezenplaz View Post
 

First, kinda wondering if  both or either of you have RAISED a preteen who thinks she's a princess per chance?

Cuz I know --I-- have so I would be cheat-coding commenting on that part. :lol:

No, I haven't! I was blessed with two boys who don't really care what color their eggs are as long as they can have enough free time to disassemble our entire house at a faster rate than I can repair it. :lol:

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

No problem to me, since I've eaten these many times:

Yeah I wasn't really having a "problem" with them - and in your example the eggs look like that because they also taste completely different, no one chose to make them look like that just for the sake of making them look more appetizing, so that's quite different IMO: I would also eat them without a problem. 

post #6 of 29

Ordo, I first thought they were mussels. :eek:

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post
 

Ordo, I first thought they were mussels. :eek:

 

He! Not that i'm really fond of those eggs. Too much preserving stuff in them.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #8 of 29

It's funny how the egg white looks like aspic.

 

I don't like egg yolks at all, so I wouldn't try that part of any egg.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #9 of 29
My reaction.

Those look good and I'd like to try one.


Now I'll go and read the rest of the thread after the picture.
post #10 of 29

I love pickled eggs, and sometimes use beets to make red eggs like that.  They look tasty to me!

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #11 of 29

I gotta say I think those eggs look ABSOLUTELY REVOLTING ordo, though I'm surprised they were mistaken as mussels....strange.

 

In answer to the original question, I may eat the pink eggs to see what they taste like, as an experience thing, but they don't look remotely attractive to me. While I think the ingenuity and skill that has gone into creating them is to be applauded, I'm left with the question: why? To me I see a lot of chefs and cooks who like to experiment, and I whole-heartedly support that, it's how we all learn and develop. However, if someone actually served that to me as a constituent part of a meal then I would look at them with a baffled expression and ask them what they were thinking.

 

Sorry if my opinion seems forthright, but you wanted to know my reaction!

post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartScholes View Post

 

Sorry if my opinion seems forthright, but you wanted to know my reaction!

 

No problem Stuart. In fact when you see them in person, they are not so revolting, but have a curious gelatinous and translucent texture. There are some youtube videos about it.
I usually eat them classic way, with tofu or better yet, with douhua, the very soft to fu.
It could make a nice new thread: Revolting to the eyes, pleasing to the taste food.
 
-Nah... bad idea.

-OK.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #13 of 29

@ordo I tasted one of those "Thousand year eggs" just once in an authentic Chinese restaurant Brussels. The eggwhite didn't look gelatinous but even then I only tasted a little bit. I don't even remember what it tasted like, it was such a long time ago.

 

@French Fries I would taste it, no problem, even though it might destroy my image, lol. They even look charming, maybe a bit "style over substance" but hey, why not? I saw a chef cook eggs twice, where the second time they go with their gently cracked shell in a dark substance (soy if I remember correctly) to give the egg some sort of "craquelure" effect.

I love experiments!

post #14 of 29

Upon first sight I'd think they were cooked in beet juice and try one.  But if you had told me they were pickled I would not try one, I don't eat pickled anything.

 

Ordo, I don't know what that is, and I'm pretty sure I wouldn't eat it even if I did.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartScholes View Post

I gotta say I think those eggs look ABSOLUTELY REVOLTING ordo, though I'm surprised they were mistaken as mussels....strange.
It was a form of expression. I didn't literally mistake them for mussels.. in simplified terms...at first glance the artful eye sees mussels. Not everyone possesses an artful eye.




“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #16 of 29
@FF....maybe...my hesitation is not because of the beet color(it's a cool look actually),but because of the presentation(or lack thereof). I would be more curious and tempted to try one if they were resting on a nice bed of baby greens or radish sprouts etc., were filled a bit fuller and plumper and and were topped with a nice garnish...chopped herb medley or micro-greens, pancetta or peppered applewood smoked bacon crumbles would all work nicely. They just seem sort of sloppy and skimpy. Eye appeal always helps whet the appetite and fill one with anticipation. I'm not entirely convinced that the filling is just egg yolk, but maybe its just heavy on the paprika that has me questioning.....maybe chicken or crab salad, which sounds like an interesting pairing with the beeted shell and one i would definitely try.
i'm also not sure if princesses even eat deviled eggs, whatever the color! wink.gif

@ ordo....both interesting and beautiful but any type of aspic just makes me gag. What is in the middle of the plate? Pickled ginger?

joey
Edited by durangojo - 4/29/14 at 10:02am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #17 of 29

growing up, my mother collected all of our Easter eggs that we had dyed all different colors and then it was a deviled egg bonanza of colors exploding... and IF there were any leftover the next day, she made egg salad sandwiches ... think about that for a minute... :look:  GROOVY MAN!

post #18 of 29

Get a gallon jug of pickled pig's feet or pickled pig's lips.  when you finish the jug, drop hot peeled boiled eggs in and wait a week or two.

The tastiest and best looking are the ones that come in the reddish juice.  I think they add the color to mask "imperfections".

I'm told the toe jam is mostly removed, and that the most gross-looking green growths are cut out before packing.

 

<[ : ^ )  Enjoy.

 

P.S.

They really are pretty good.

post #19 of 29

Unlike some folks here, I like just about anything that has been pickled.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #20 of 29
I think they are darling .

My favorite filling is : salmon, mayo, keens and a grate of dill.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #21 of 29

My first thought was "pickled in beet juice. Yum!"

 

I love hard boiled eggs with pickled beets so these look just fine to me.

post #22 of 29

Of course I would eat them.

The first time I saw this picture I thought, "Boiled in beet juice? This is brilliant!"

 

My only concerns would be if they'd stain my fingers and will there be leftovers?

Life's too short not to eat pink eggs when the opportunity arises.

post #23 of 29
Quote:
I tasted one of those "Thousand year eggs" just once in an authentic Chinese restaurant Brussels...... I don't even remember what it tasted like, it was such a long time ago.

That made me chuckle.

 

Quote:
 I didn't literally mistake them for mussels.. in simplified terms...at first glance the artful eye sees mussels. Not everyone possesses an artful eye.
Quote:
 Ordo, I first thought they were mussels. :eek:

That's why I was surprised you had mistaken them for mussels. As for the artful eye, I'm trying to assume that the comment was not intended to suggest that you have an artful eye and that I'm an un-cultured Philistine. I can see why you would draw the similarity with mussels but not why you would say you actually thought they were mussels. Even if your eye saw mussels and mine didn't, it doesn't mean either of us does or doesn't have an artful (artistic) eye. The artful eye sees what it sees. Your eye is artful, so you see mussels. My eye is artful and I didn't. End of story.

post #24 of 29

I mentioned eggs cooked with a craquelure effect or marble effect if you like. I had to search a bit on the net, but I found a picture. The recipe says to cook them first for 10 minutes in water, then crack the shell gently and boil them again for 30 minutes this time, adding 3 bags of black tea and 2 tsp of ketjap. Leave to cool in the water. Peel, et voilà.

 

 

@StuartScholes Maybe I should have clarified that the eggs that ordo posted are actually called "Thousand year eggs"?

post #25 of 29

Lol, I know, I just thought it sounded funny that they were thousand year eggs you'd had a long time ago! Must be my weird sense of humour! I've seen the cracked eggs effect before. I find that much more pleasing to the eye, it looks good. Probably because the brown is a more natural looking colour I think.

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartScholes View Post
 

That made me chuckle.

 

That's why I was surprised you had mistaken them for mussels. As for the artful eye, I'm trying to assume that the comment was not intended to suggest that you have an artful eye and that I'm an un-cultured Philistine. I can see why you would draw the similarity with mussels but not why you would say you actually thought they were mussels. Even if your eye saw mussels and mine didn't, it doesn't mean either of us does or doesn't have an artful (artistic) eye. The artful eye sees what it sees. Your eye is artful, so you see mussels. My eye is artful and I didn't. End of story.

Are you really seriously taking it that literally? wow. Too much time.


Edited by Pollopicu - 4/30/14 at 8:22am
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #27 of 29

I got a similar look on pickled eggs using red wine vinegar and a bit of red wine for the pickling juice. I like that look.

post #28 of 29

Talking about exotic food colors, today my wife brought this:

 

Smoked and fermented garlic

 

 

 

 

Nice, very much alike a soft prune.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post
 

Are you really seriously taking it that literally? wow. Too much time.

If you have a problem with my comments then would you please mail me in private so we can discuss it rather than continuing to spam this thread with snidey little insults.

 

As for the black garlic, I had some of that a while back. I enjoyed it, though as I recall it was better crushed and added to a sauce to give some depth of flavour.

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