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helt With water stones

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Someone stole my water stones So need som New thinking of a king 800, 3000, and a 6000. What do you guys think about theese? And what is best to flattening With? Have almost zero money So :-P
post #2 of 20
Sorry to hear about your misadventure. For the time being I would skip the 6k. Not that essential for kitchen knives. Would you want a bit more polish than your 3k affords, try stropping on leather, denim, newspaper, whatever you have.
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Okey and what do you recomend to flattening With? :-)
post #4 of 20
For the time being coarse sandpaper will do.
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Stupid question but how do i keep the sandpaper flat? :-P
Edited by mrbushido - 4/30/14 at 3:42pm
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
And is There Any good cheap Diamond plate to flattening With?
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
Is se dmt plates on ebay for about 30 bucks any good? :-)
post #8 of 20
I use a am tech diamond for flattening It's cheap but only comes in 6×2 don't use it for sharpening though. It wears out pretty fast.

30 bucks for a dmt plate is a good deal. I'd I were you I would get 2 plates a medium and a ex . fine and something finer for polish. A 5k norton or a fine ceramic will do ok
Mikael
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
But is thoose dmt plates on ebay any good? Hear There are difference between mono diamonds and such?
post #10 of 20
All dmt "stones" are mono crystaline diamonds. And of high quality. If you don't use too much pressure they'll last forever and if you should break one they have an warranty So I think they'll replace it.

I use diamonds and they are very ggood but you should get some that are at least 20 cm long. short stones are harder to use.

Another brand is eze lap in my opinion they are just as good. So just get whatever brand you can get cheapest.
post #11 of 20
And by the way get what you want from the start. You'll save money in the long run. Belive me smile.gif

i got a lot of junk because I've been buying cheap stuff trying to save money. Only to come back to get the good stuff later
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
Okey Thanks mates :-D Is a diamond steel neceserry? Or ceramic hone? :-P

Want to hold my knife in the best shape it can be :-) and have the gear i need if later il buy a better knife
post #13 of 20
For basic flattening, a piece of heavy float glass is an excellent reference plate -- and CHEAP. For coarse stones, drywall screen is very effective, too.

I personally do not like a jump as much as 800 to 3k: it's a lot of work on the 3k. Last time I bought stones, 2k stones were much cheaper than 3k. For those knives that want more polish, 2k to 6k is fairly trivial; the 3k setup is irrelevant here.

I do think Kings are wildly underrated among sharpening snobs. Good stones, very good tactile response, easy to flatten, cheap.
post #14 of 20
I wouldn't recommend a steel. I use both a ceramic and a diamond at work. But I usually don't bother on my home knives.

The edge will last a long time for home use and you'll probably sharpen your knives more often than you need to anyways.

So save your mmoney for stones or knives instead. and touch up on a finishing stone or a strop
Mikael
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
Okey Thanks mates :-)
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikael View Post

I wouldn't recommend a steel. I use both a ceramic and a diamond at work. But I usually don't bother on my home knives.

The edge will last a long time for home use and you'll probably sharpen your knives more often than you need to anyways.

So save your mmoney for stones or knives instead. and touch up on a finishing stone or a strop
Mikael

I think you bring up good point(s) that there is more than one way too keep a knife sharp or touch up between sharpening, and you can make it fit your budget.

Depending on the actual knife and steel etc I have used all kinds of things to different levels of acceptability. This includes a light strop on a 2k or 6k stone or light grit (2500 & above) wet sanding paper applied to a hard surface, a $5 eBay ceramic rod that is much too short, a piece of leather loaded with whatever abrasives I had avail, a glass rod, and even a smooth piece of wood and bottom of a ceramic plate or cup.

Note I'm not putting my Konosuke onto the bottom of a cup etc but it works well with lesser steels etc, and obviously these methods as well as most others will have better results with different steel and hardness as well, but for me at least (and in sure others as well) the less expensive do work and allow more money to be a valve available for purchasing knives and other equipment.

When I first got into j knives my budget was limited and I wasn't going to opt to get a $30-50 ceramic honing rod over a pretty etc, and though funds have definitely been available since it messy didn't make it's way to happening so I guess it's just not that important though I figure I will add a better more suitable one at some point.

So if your budget is tight you can consider all the different options that won't limit you as much.

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

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"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #17 of 20
I'm not sure if this will help.

I'm saving up to replace my king stones with a ToolsfromJapan set (no affiliation, just a satisfied customer). It's a set of good ceramic stones with a diamond plate for a decent price IMO.

Bear in mind, I'm mainly using it for guitar building tools.
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Lau View Post

I'm not sure if this will help.

I'm saving up to replace my king stones with a ToolsfromJapan set (no affiliation, just a satisfied customer). It's a set of good ceramic stones with a diamond plate for a decent price IMO.

Bear in mind, I'm mainly using it for guitar building tools.
Sorry, old thread, but just in case...

For woodworking tools, such as chisels, you want very hard stones. For kitchen knives, the received wisdom is that you want soft stones. Kings are sort of medium, good for everything and spectacular for nothing.

Then again, I have been very happy with very hard stones for my knives, so you'll just have to take this as received wisdom that is probably based on something real.
post #19 of 20
Not that old, and sometimes received wisdom can be wise.

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #20 of 20
Cheap diamond lapping plates can be had from a company named Atoma... Lee Valley carries the product in North America. About half the price of the dmt xxt
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