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Why would you hire someone/accept someone with no experience?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

What would be a reason you would hire someone or accept them into your kitchen with no experience in a professional kitchen? What qualities do they need to have to stand out?

post #2 of 11

Openness, Honesty about their skills, Enthusiasm, Punctuality, Dedication, Energy.

 

I've hired several people with no skills at all but they had the above. One eventually graduated first in her class at the CIA and became Susan Spicer's sous chef. 

Others worked out well too.

Only one was a complete bomb and left within a month. 

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply
post #3 of 11

I think it depends on the individual.  Like stated above, if they are humble, eager to learn, have a sense of urgency, and generally want to be their, the rest can be taught.  Someone who's motivated to do well will usually succeed.  Also, someone with no experience doesn't have any bad habits that need to be broken and don't come in acting like they know it all.

post #4 of 11

Knowledge can be taught, skills can be taught. Attitude cannot be taught. My answer is a positive attitude.

post #5 of 11
Ive been hiring people for almost 30 years. A great many have been people with no expierence but had a true desire to work and learn. I havent been disapointed too many times. Attitude and sincerity go a long way.
post #6 of 11

Anyone that I hire / accept in my kitchen is already assumed to have no experience.

They have never worked in 'my' kitchen so they can not have any experience.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys, one last thing do you recommend they know any cooking techniques before entering your kitchen?

post #8 of 11

Know how to listen---know your knives,and bring them.

 

Of course,any knowledge you already have is good---but watch and learn.

 

When training a new hire I asked that they do it my way---after they mastered my way--I will be glad to see if your way is better  or faster--until you learned my methods--best to shut up.

post #9 of 11

some make some don't 

I hired a young man once , he turned up out of the blue when i needed a wash up crew, he had no English skills what so ever and his reference from his last job was written on the back of a packet of cigarettes . in desperation for a wash up crew i put him on, He turned out to be the best ever employee ever , turned up on time , stayed back when needed, never complained, as i said  "some make some don't" 

 

PS It was a sad sad day when immigration turned up to deport his arse to Mongolia 

post #10 of 11

Don't expect to do very much cooking for a little while, but don't let that discourage you.  Just like in any kitchen, only the strong survive.  Also, familiarize yourself with certain pan sizes, 1/6 pan, 1/9 pan, hotel pan....1/2 hotel pan.  What a rondo is, what a chinois is....etc

post #11 of 11

I was out of catering for almost 9 years.  My first job  when I came back in was at a place that made virtually  everything from scratch.  I put an add on the internet advertising myself, they could see I was a hard worker so they gave me the job.

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