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FIrst Yanagiba !!!!!

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hello Everyone 

 

I am looking to get my first yanagiba, I am debating over the Konosuke Fujiyama 270mm White #2 yanagiba or the Gesshin hide 270mm Blue #1 yanagiba. Thank you for your help 

 

Ps: I know how to sharpen, I have 1200 bester, 5k rika, 2k shapton pro. I am also looking to pick up either a 5k shapton pro or a 5k-6k gesshin splash and go. 

 

I currently have:

Masamoto 240mm KS gyuto 

Sakai Yusuke 240mm gyuto special thin 

Ikkashi Tadasuna 270mm inox gyuto

Komaguro 240 blue #2 gyuto

Konosuke HD 150mm petty  

 

Thank you for your help, I am currently hinting towards the gesshin only because i heard so many good things about it. I have lightly used a Konosuke 300mm white #2 fujiyama yanagiba, though it was a bit heavy at the time. 

post #2 of 13
If it is your first single bevel, get it from a reseller that will open it for you. Jon Broida (US) or Maxime (Europe) come to mind.
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks Ben user
What is open up? If anything I can ask some of my coworkers to teach me to.
Thanks
post #4 of 13
They don't ship ready for use. Some work is involved that's very different from what you're used to with double-bevelled ones.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gvDjASvVHek&fulldescription=1&hl=nl&gl=NL&client=mv-google&guid=
post #5 of 13

why are you trying to buy a top-level yanagiba as your first?  Doesnt it make more sense to get something that will be easier to learn on?

post #6 of 13

That's a very nice set of knives Allen. I would lean towards the GH from Jon. I'd second Benuser's advice to buy from a retailer that will open the knife for you. The last I looked Korin performs this service for free if you buy a knife from them. I have no idea if Jon charges for the service but if he does it would be $$$ well spent.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the quick replies, guys. Jbrodia, I am not a big fan of starter knives or budget knives. I am a bit OCT when it comes to finishes and what not. If i buy somthing I want to make sure I am happy with when I get it and 10, 20 years down the road . Thank you ducKfat, I really want the gesshin hide, was originally going to pick up a doi blue #2 270mm but unfortunately they ran out of stock. Do you guys have any other suggestions that I could look at, I am pretty set on either one, unless I can get my hands on the doi.
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks Ben user for the video really helpful
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allen Lum View Post

Thanks for the quick replies, guys. Jbrodia, I am not a big fan of starter knives or budget knives. I am a bit OCT when it comes to finishes and what not. If i buy somthing I want to make sure I am happy with when I get it and 10, 20 years down the road . Thank you ducKfat, I really want the gesshin hide, was originally going to pick up a doi blue #2 270mm but unfortunately they ran out of stock. Do you guys have any other suggestions that I could look at, I am pretty set on either one, unless I can get my hands on the doi.

here's why i asked... i see a lot of people buying yanagibas... some for their first time and some who have some experience with them.  However, because there are not many people who have good training with them (including many japanese chefs i see here), most people's technique with them is not the best.  This means that most people are likely to make mistakes with their knives... even more so when its their first of this type.  Because of that, i recommend starting off with more simple things and working from there.  I often recommend a less expensive white #2 yanagiba for the following reasons:

-White #2 is easier to sharpen so when you make mistakes, they are easier to fix

-White #2 is less brittle, so mistakes tend to be less severe

-Its less nerve-racking to use a less expensive blade and make mistakes than doing the same on a much more expensive knife

 

Once one works on their knife skills/technique and sharpening to a point that they are no longer making so many mistakes, then it makes sense to get a higher end knife (if you feel the need for one still at that point).  You will be better able to use and care for it and less likely to cause damage... even if the knife is harder, more brittle, etc.

 

Does this make sense?

post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks Jon

Thanks, I do understand where you are going at now, if I do decide to go with somthing less expensive, what would you recommend, are you talking about something like the gesshin uraku or even cheaper like the $80 Yanagiba with plastic ferrels? I really appreciate the help, everyone expecially Jbrodia

Allen

Ps. I Was Also Thinking Of Picking Up A 5000 To 6000 Splash and Go Stone for work, either deciding between gesshin 5k or 6k (provided when they come back in stock) or a shapton 5k.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allen Lum View Post

Thanks Jon

Thanks, I do understand where you are going at now, if I do decide to go with somthing less expensive, what would you recommend, are you talking about something like the gesshin uraku or even cheaper like the $80 Yanagiba with plastic ferrels? I really appreciate the help, everyone expecially Jbrodia

Allen

Ps. I Was Also Thinking Of Picking Up A 5000 To 6000 Splash and Go Stone for work, either deciding between gesshin 5k or 6k (provided when they come back in stock) or a shapton 5k.

i'm not entirely comfortable making recommendations on a forum like this considering my work... i'm happy to answer questions, but when it comes to making specific recommendations (brands, etc.), its better if that is left to others.

 

Otherwise, i'm happy to correspond via e-mail or PM.

 

Anyways, the gist of what i am recommending is a good basic yanagiba.  Generally, in my experience, the extremely inexpensive ones have all kinds of issues, so its not about buying the cheapest knife, but rather the knife that will be the best fit... good grind, good fit and finish, steel that will be conducive to learning, etc.  Does that make sense?

post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks Jon I totally understand what you are saying, I will replying to your email soon. I am looking at a average quality Yanagiba. I am deciding on either the gesshin uraku about $215 or a artisugu 20 mm white do you know of anything that fits the but but maybe in blue steel
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks Jon and Dave for the PMing me I am going make a decision soon and I will let you guys know. And post some picks
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