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post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
When buying a knife which is said to be the soul of the chef?

Is it tje maker or steel used or price or sharping stone? What do you consider?

I'm buying a knife today with my very first money I got from working in the kitchen.

Please gicve me some good advice.

Thank you.
post #2 of 6
When I shop for a knife, at this point, my main concern is not creating a redundancy in my collection. I am not one of those people who wants large numbers of gyutos -- I want each knife to have its own special purpose & actually be used. For example, I wouldn't want to use a gyuto for poultry boning, so I got a honesuki.

I have tried many steels, and determined that I prefer blue and white carbon steels, from Japan. I dislike western knives, and I find custom handles to be tacky and gauche, so I look for nice wa-handled knives with little to no "bling" factor. My absolute favorite maker isTakeo Murata - I have a wa-gyuto from him that required a fair amount of elbow grease to make "perfect" but that process bonded me to the blade. I like kuro uchi finishes, for wabi-sabi.
Edited by Fritz MacKrieg - 5/2/14 at 5:36pm
post #3 of 6

Materials, design, cratfsmanship, grind, reputation, price. I don't like a lot of curve in the blade edge, straight or minimal angles in the handle to blade relationship. Thin blade, full grind, no hollow, or sabre grinds for me. Higher grade steel, I'm flexible about the handle. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightchef18 View Post

When buying a knife which is said to be the soul of the chef?

 

 

Don't know if that is romantic B.S. or just plain B.S. advertising huey.

 

Clothes don't make the man, and knives don't make a "Chef".

 

The soul of a good cook can be judged by what they put on a plate:

 

Choice of ingredients, presentation, and choice and execution of various techniques.  That'll tell me what the "Soul" of a good cook is.

 

Look, it's great that you're buying a knife with the first money you earned in the kitchen.  I did it, everyone else has done it too.  But after 30-odd years of working in kitchens, a knife is just a hunk of steel with a sharp edge, no magic.  The magic is in your hands and brain.

 

My humble advice?

Get a Mac or a Victorinox for around 70 bucks.  Use it, abuse it.  Learn how to sharpen on it.  Lend it out to co-workers and observe how they use it or treat it.  If you're just starting in the kitchen you'll be given all the prep jobs, and for this you need a workhorse, not a thoroughbred-- nothing over $150, O.K.?

 

Knives tend to "grow legs"--get lost or stolen in the kitchen.  I don't know  how many paring knives I've lost by sweeping them up with vegetable trimmings into the garbage, don't know how many knives have been stolen by co-workers, Bosses, sales reps, delivery drivers, etc.  Knives I'd  given up as lost  show up in the bar tender's hands 3 mths later, and even when my initials are burned into the handle or engraved on the blade, the bartender still swears he bought it online somewhere....

 

Leave all the expensive stuff alone for a few years until you can really handle a knife properly.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

Don't know if that is romantic B.S. or just plain B.S. advertising huey.

Clothes don't make the man, and knives don't make a "Chef".

The soul of a good cook can be judged by what they put on a plate:

Choice of ingredients, presentation, and choice and execution of various techniques.  That'll tell me what the "Soul" of a good cook is.

Look, it's great that you're buying a knife with the first money you earned in the kitchen.  I did it, everyone else has done it too.  But after 30-odd years of working in kitchens, a knife is just a hunk of steel with a sharp edge, no magic.  The magic is in your hands and brain.

My humble advice?


Get a Mac or a Victorinox for around 70 bucks.  Use it, abuse it.  Learn how to sharpen on it.  Lend it out to co-workers and observe how they use it or treat it.  If you're just starting in the kitchen you'll be given all the prep jobs, and for this you need a workhorse, not a thoroughbred-- nothing over $150, O.K.?

Knives tend to "grow legs"--get lost or stolen in the kitchen.  I don't know  how many paring knives I've lost by sweeping them up with vegetable trimmings into the garbage, don't know how many knives have been stolen by co-workers, Bosses, sales reps, delivery drivers, etc.  Knives I'd  given up as lost  show up in the bar tender's hands 3 mths later, and even when my initials are burned into the handle or engraved on the blade, the bartender still swears he bought it online somewhere....

Leave all the expensive stuff alone for a few years until you can really handle a knife properly.
Thank you for your humble advice. I got your advice and decided to use any knife I have right now. You made me think what a chef really is.
Thank you again for all the comments and advices.
post #6 of 6

Hey no problem.

 

Glad to have you here with us on Cheftalk.

 

Edward

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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