or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Question on slow roasting chicken thighs
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Question on slow roasting chicken thighs

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Here's something I want to try:

 

Start with bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs.  Trim off excess fat and loose skin.  Make a marinade (not really a marinade) with butter, olive oil, ginger, garlic, harissa, turmeric, salt, saffron, etc. etc.  Rub liberally on to the thighs.  Place in a cast iron casserole.  Cover with lid.  Place in oven pre-heated to 250F and roast for 2 to 3 hours.  Then remove lid and broil at 375 for 20 to 30 minutes until the chicken is browned, but not burnt.  Check temperature for 165.  Serve.

 

Is there a health concern when roasting the chicken at that low a temperature?  

 

Thank you for your input and advice.

post #2 of 9
No health concern in my opinion. But I think It will take less time. And you won't need to broil it for that long. I bet they broil in less than 5 min.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #3 of 9

Eh, disclaimer, this is no official advice and all... but with those temperatures and times, they are perfectly safe. At 165 F core temp you are perfectly fine. I tend to go a bit lower, but I know where my chicks come from.

post #4 of 9

On thighs I prefer to go to 175 for fall off the bone tender. They are still very juicy at that temp and no pink near the bone I sometimes see at 165(doesn't bother me but other people freak, raw chicken thing). Skin texture could be an issue if not broiled until crispy.

post #5 of 9

I do whole chickens at that temp range and that time range, never had any problems. And as Mary said, fattier thighs can take a bit higher heat, especially bone in, skin on.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #6 of 9

When it comes to chicken, I rarely use a temp probe. I reserve that for BBQing large chunks of meat, low and slow. The chicks just get poked with the finger a bit to see if they are done :)

post #7 of 9
I had this argument at thanksgiving too. Salmonella starts dying at 130 F. An hour at 140 will kill off the bacteria as well as a few seconds at 165. If you are skow roasting, smoking etc, then your meat is at a temp that will begin killing off salmonella for a longer time on the way up. 165 is not some magic number, just what the gov deemed foolproof. My concern with chicken is getting crisp skin without drying out the meat. Brining is not necessary on thighs but it does give you a nice margin for error. I've hit over 180 without drying out thighs.
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for your input.  I will try it out in the next week or two and let you know how it turns out.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post
 

On thighs I prefer to go to 175 for fall off the bone tender. They are still very juicy at that temp and no pink near the bone I sometimes see at 165(doesn't bother me but other people freak, raw chicken thing). Skin texture could be an issue if not broiled until crispy.


I've heard that "...pink near the bone..."  or joint when the meat has reached the "correct temperature" can indicate a chicken that was raised way way WAY too fast, on antibiotics and/or growth hormones.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Question on slow roasting chicken thighs