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Let's See Your Kitchen/Dining Rooms - Page 2

post #31 of 45


I've got my "little" herb garden out the back door from the kitchen too. I'm up to 14 herbs this year.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
post #32 of 45

Just get yourself a Kneading / Pastry board... many styles and pretty cheap if you build it yourself.

 

Images for Kneading Boards

 

 

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #33 of 45

Brandon-

I assume you're talking $39 a foot for the marble, installed. Or is it $39 plus the cost of the marble? :suprise:

 

We retained an architect specializing in kitchen and bath design when we rebuilt our condo, and she had a thing against stone of any kind, insisting a synthetic was greatly preferable, especially from a maintenance standpoint.. We picked a "Zodiac" brand synthetic which was black with some glittery specks on it.  We got a 3"x5" sample and carried it around. 

 

We stopped into a counter shop, our sample with us: they had 2'x4' pieces of countertop material lining the walls.  My wife headed to a big, black piece and said "WOW! that sure looks better in a big size."   The saleslady said "Honey, that ain't Zodiac, that's  Brazilian granite!"  My wife looked back and forth at the wall and her sample, and then - literally -  just dropped the sample into a wastebasket.  I could see the handwriting on the wall, so to speak, and we went with the "Black GALAXY" Brazilian granite and have lived happily ever after.  It has varied gold and silver flecks and, I swear to God, it looks like they're inside the material and you're looking through the surface of the counter at the random flecks inside. Always dramatic.

 

Our supplier/installer said just wipe it with a damp cloth and otherwise leave it alone- don't need sealers, miracle oils, whatever. We've done just that for 10+ years and it's just fine.  We do take care not to set really hot pans directly on it; we were warned by one of the members here not to create too great a thermal-expansion stress in the counter, though the supplier when he put it in said we didn't have to worry about stuff like that.  (We got the extra-thick 1"  material.)  That's not much trouble, and we figure better safe than sorry.  

 

If you lean that way,  I hope your wife might take another look at what's available. We remain just absolutely delighted with it. 

 

Ten or so years ago, we paid about $55 per square foot for the extra-thick,  installed.

 

Mike

 

Edit- Just realized I misstated the name... it's Black GALAXY Brazilian granite. Got confused with the DuPont brand name Zodiac for their artificial stone counter material.  Sorry for the error.


Edited by MikeLM - 5/22/14 at 6:49pm
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon ODell View Post

If you have any experience tiling, you should do them yourself. I did it at our last house. I went to a flooring liquidator and bought marble tile for $2.50 per tile. Screwed down green board, applied the tile with mastic and put on a stone rail on the front of the counter supported by a trim piece underneath, 1/4" spacing between tiles and fine ground grout. Water sealer over the grout. They looked great and cost me around $400 after I added a marble back splash.

The only downside was having the seams between the grout because it didn't leave me with a large seamless space to roll dough. Next time I will add a wood or stainless slab if I do it again.

If you haven't had corian before, I would choose something else. Its not heat resistant enough and it stains a lot easier than marble or quartz. My customers that have corian all wish they would have chosen something else.

Around here, we have places that will install marble at $39 sq ft. I can't talk my wife into marble though. I still have to figure out what we're going to do.


I didn't realize you had posted this, sorry. I'm absolutely not handy at all. Nothing. nada. zilch. I wouldn't even be able to glue a tile in it's place. It's nice to be able to do things yourself and save the extra dough. Have wished many times I could. I once put wall paper up, tho.

 

Anyway, I was able to find a decent granite for $58.00 a sq ft (santa cecilia), so we'll see. Have an app next week to visit the slab.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #35 of 45
Thread Starter 

We did our kitchen re-do in 2009 and got our granite countertops installed for $29/sq ft (I did the demo myself)... but then I finally decided to re-do the two bathrooms in 2012 and it cost $89/sq ft !!  What a difference a few years can make, huh?

post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeLM View Post
 

Brandon-

I assume you're talking $39 a foot for the marble, installed. Or is it $39 plus the cost of the marble? :suprise:

 

We retained an architect specializing in kitchen and bath design when we rebuilt our condo, and she had a thing against stone of any kind, insisting a synthetic was greatly preferable, especially from a maintenance standpoint.. We picked a "Zodiac" brand synthetic which was black with some glittery specks on it.  We got a 3"x5" sample and carried it around. 

 

We stopped into a counter shop, our sample with us: they had 2'x4' pieces of countertop material lining the walls.  My wife headed to a big, black piece and said "WOW! that sure looks better in a big size."   The saleslady said "Honey, that ain't Zodiac, that's  Brazilian granite!"  My wife looked back and forth at the wall and her sample, and then - literally -  just dropped the sample into a wastebasket.  I could see the handwriting on the wall, so to speak, and we went with the "Black Zodiac" Brazilian granite and have lived happily ever after.  It has varied gold and silver flecks and, I swear to God, it looks like they're inside the material and you're looking through the surface of the counter at the random flecks inside. Always dramatic.

 

Our supplier/installer said just wipe it with a damp cloth and otherwise leave it alone- don't need sealers, miracle oils, whatever. We've done just that for 10+ years and it's just fine.  We do take care not to set really hot pans directly on it; we were warned by one of the members here not to create too great a thermal-expansion stress in the counter, though the supplier when he put it in said we didn't have to worry about stuff like that.  (We got the extra-thick 1"  material.)  That's not much trouble, and we figure better safe than sorry.  

 

If you lean that way,  I hope your wife might take another look at what's available. We remain just absolutely delighted with it. 

 

Ten or so years ago, we paid about $55 per square foot for the extra-thick,  installed.

 

Mike

Mike, I just googled the counter, very nice.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeLM View Post

 

We retained an architect specializing in kitchen and bath design when we rebuilt our condo, and she had a thing against stone of any kind, insisting a synthetic was greatly preferable, especially from a maintenance standpoint.. 

 

Granite, marble and butcher block have been residential kitchen countertop standard for years. There's nothing like natural materials (for home use anyway), and I'm sure Dupont (manufacturer of Zodiac) would like to convince you otherwise. Zodiak has it's uses but I'm a bit confused that she told you it was "greatly" preferable. As a design professional I hardly ever spec'd Corian. Way too expensive. My 2 cents. 

post #38 of 45

Jake-

 

The first kitchen I built, almost 40 years ago, I put in Corian, which was, then, sort of the new miracle countertop.  At that time, Dupont would only sell it to "qualified" installers, but one branch of the development company I worked for was in homebuilding, so I didn't have much trouble picking up what I needed. Wholesale, even. ;)  As an experienced woodworker, I had no trouble at all working the stuff. I just needed a couple particular sawblades (triple-chip ATBR  as I recall) and it handled like a really hard wood,  just slightly more prone to chipping. We used those counters hard for well over 30 years and were quite happy with it, but ready for a change when I did the kitchen in the new  condo.

 

I wouldn't have anything bad to say about Corian,  but just point out there are a lot of interesting alternatives these days.

 

Mike

 

edit- It was a triple-chip Alternate Top Bevel  with a Raker tooth, I just remembered. Fixed it above.


Edited by MikeLM - 6/13/14 at 6:32pm
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #39 of 45
MikeLM, that is $39 per foot installed, including the cost of the marble. Its a local company. Other companies in my area start at around $60 sq ft.

I just checked that company's website since it has been awhile since I saw one of their signs. Their current price is $35 installed. Of course, that is a "starting" price and only covers a few different marble types. Others cost more. I would be surprised if they don't charge extra for tear out and haul away and other things too.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
post #40 of 45

This is what our kitchen was like in Feb 2007

 

 

 

Below are pictures from today. However, if you'd like to see what changes have been made since the renovation follow this link

http://www.cheftalk.com/g/a/94/home-kitchens-for-comparison/ 

The first 3 in that album are of the kitchen we gave up when we moved in November 2006

 

Looking out the bay window at the island table. Storage on the left as well as the right side base.

 

 

The dining room was my 10 anniversary present to the DW. The other one was badly beat-up after 3 moves and I figured it was what she had earned with all the hassle. It's the last one we ever plan to buy too.

 

 

Disclaimer; By the way....normally we're fairly private about personal property but  don't mind since we have a great insurance policy, better alarm system, outstandingt neighbors (always on the watch plus a couple of them are police and heavily armed) and the city police will not hesitate in shooting thieves.

post #41 of 45

RE : Corian. 

 

When you use it sparingly it might be cost effective, but when it's used commercially, at much larger square footage either in retail or hospitality applications, it can affect your budget - especially when there are cheaper alternatives. Tile for example, can be $100 or more cheaper per sq/ft., and recycled glass for backsplashes can afford the color variations one might need. Laminates can be even less expensive at $25/sq ft, although the following polymer comment applies to that as well. I also think laminates are cheap and would never use them in a residential setting. I know, lots of Ikea and Home Depot use laminates for cabinetry, but I'd rather just used raw pine or a fruit wood and finish it myself. As long as the wood came from a sustainable source. Not like brazilian mahogany -which is being depleted at alarming rates for the IMF, Wall Street, as well as governments.

 

Laminates as well as corian are entirely made of polymers (well, mostly). They last forever, yet your kitchen or a store for Banana Republic will not. It's not very "green." Also, when you are developing a budget for commercial use you have to manage a budget, and sometimes money is better spent elsewhere. Although marble is very expensive (depending on the type), it can be recycled, and in my opinion, is more beautiful than a man made "engineered" material. I'd even go for butcher block before plastic. Sure, there are more color combo's and customizable colors with synthetic surfaces, but it's not worth it in my opinion. I'll stay with natural materials, thank you, if at all possible. I know plastic is hard to get away from, but we need to start realizing the abuses of industry.

 

Again, my 2 cents. 

post #42 of 45
Great thread.
Will have to see if I am as lucky posting my kitchen as I was my "face" lol.
@ChicagoTerry. I have Windows 8 as well and sometimes just want to rip my hair out and go running down the street screaming.
We are preparing for The Fisherman's retirement by downsizing.
So much stuff accumulates over time most of which has no value, monetary nor sentimental.
Was finally able to start getting rid of almost all of the tools of the trade and as things go out the door we are doing a bit of a remodel and updating.
Rambling as usual.
What I was wanting to toss out there is what do y'all think of concrete kitchen counters?
I think I may be in love with the concept of 100% self designed and DIY counters with an apron front farmer sink.
Have brought home lots of info as well as looked at a zillion pix on Pinterest.
The Fisherman says he is up for it but will have to add it to the "wish list" for now.
That's ok.
It will take me forever and a day to choose colors lol.

mimi
post #43 of 45
Thread Starter 

@oldschool1982 beautiful re-do!

post #44 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post
 

@oldschool1982 beautiful re-do!

 

@kaneohegirlinaz   Thanks. When we moved in, the kitchen wreaked of 1966 as well as grease and stale food. We tolerated it for a couple months and then had enough! The house had been vacant for more than a year and and it needed a lot of help.

 

As a note, I typed this almost two weeks ago and thought it posted. Imagine my embarrassment to find it was sitting in the post reply box at the bottom of the page when I visited the thread. Certainly didn't mean to leave you hanging.

post #45 of 45
Thread Starter 

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