or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Fish en Papillote?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Fish en Papillote?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm trying to find an easy way to serve white fish en papillote, but haven't quite figured out a restaurant-friendly way of staging it. It needs minimal work so my line can handle it. We aren't a grand restaurant so the customers won't want to wait too long. Any suggestions?
post #2 of 15

What kind of fish are you looking to cook?  Thankfully fish en pipillote is just about the easiest thing to make, lay down a few thinly sliced aromatic veggies, the fish on top, drizzle with olive oil, wrap it up and stick it in the oven.  Let the customer unwrap it themselves.  

 

I like zucchini and red peppers tossed with scalliion and parsley, topped with a piece of any kind of fish you got..

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
We have various white fish to work with so it's whatever the head chef agrees on. All of them would work well en papillote. I was thinking strips of zucchini, bell peppers, and carrots underneath the fish, topped with two slices of lemon and a white wine/rosemary compound butter?

Another Question: would it be odd to serve a starch beside the papillote when plating? Or maybe there is a way to put rice or something inside with the fish...?
post #4 of 15

You will likely want some sort of liquid when cooking en Papillote. Especially with a firm flesh fish that may not have a lot of moisture. You are relying on steam to cook the contents in the packets so a splash of white wine or fish fume is common. Not sure if this is a method I would suggest with white fish as many are too thin or delicate and can over cook before the Veg is done. If using Parchment I'd suggest lightly oiling the paper and not the fish.

A great way to do Salmon though as long as service is on point.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #5 of 15

What about individual papillotes?

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousMunchkin View Post

We have various white fish to work with so it's whatever the head chef agrees on. All of them would work well en papillote. I was thinking strips of zucchini, bell peppers, and carrots underneath the fish, topped with two slices of lemon and a white wine/rosemary compound butter?

Another Question: would it be odd to serve a starch beside the papillote when plating? Or maybe there is a way to put rice or something inside with the fish...?

 

I do think they should be wrapped in individual portions.  You can also place potato directly inside the parchment.  I've done so with thinly sliced potato.  Depending on what the fish is you may want to parcook the potatoes first so that they cook evenly.  I suppose you can do with wtih rice as well though I've never tried it.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousMunchkin View Post

Another Question: would it be odd to serve a starch beside the papillote when plating? Or maybe there is a way to put rice or something inside with the fish...?

 

 It's not uncommon to serve starch beside the Papillote but don't put it in the packet. I'm assuming you are choosing this method to save time at service. That means the fish needs to be pre-wrapped and you do not want raw fish setting on starch for an extended period before cooking. This would also complicate consistency and can create far more problems than it may solve.

If you do use a thin white fish make sure your cooks are using a very fine Julienne.

I would not use compound butter. Remember this dish is meant to be light so adding fats and oils can really detract from the dish rapidly, especially on a delicate fish.

Servings should always be individual in a restaurant unless this is a special event or you intend to serve family style.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #8 of 15

There are slightly different ways to prepare en papillote, but this is the way I have prepared them in the past.

 

julienned carrots, scallions, shiitake, lemon slices, kosher salt, butter, wine/broth.

http://s20.postimg.org/ygqe2eocd/DSCN9394.jpg

 

I would just do two thin lemon slices instead. 3 was too much.

http://s20.postimg.org/i9k3mchbx/DSCN9398.jpg

 

http://s20.postimg.org/c9wciowjh/DSCN9399.jpg

 

add a little butter, some broth, and or wine. Just a touch dough because the fish itself will release some liquids that will be trapped in the steam pouch.

 

http://s20.postimg.org/o0aa02pbx/DSCN9406.jpg

 

http://s20.postimg.org/n1yibj1dp/DSCN9418.jpg

 

 

Personally, I don't like using foil for papillote.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #9 of 15

Nice photos PP.

post #10 of 15

Thank you, Pete.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckFat View Post

 It's not uncommon to serve starch beside the Papillote but don't put it in the packet. I'm assuming you are choosing this method to save time at service. That means the fish needs to be pre-wrapped and you do not want raw fish setting on starch for an extended period before cooking. This would also complicate consistency and can create far more problems than it may solve.
If you do use a thin white fish make sure your cooks are using a very fine Julienne.
I would not use compound butter. Remember this dish is meant to be light so adding fats and oils can really detract from the dish rapidly, especially on a delicate fish.
Servings should always be individual in a restaurant unless this is a special event or you intend to serve family style.

Beautiful photos indeed! I never thought of the aspect of leaving raw fish on starch as issue since I'm a home cook, it's interesting to see how a professional approaches things vs a home cook.

As for the issue of the compound butter, I think it's nice to have it as it adds another dimension of flavor. Could it be served complimentary on the side? I would love it as an option, I think compound butters don't get used often enough.

That reminds me of having fond memories at a restaurant called The Mill Street Grill in Staunton, VA. I used to gig there as a musician in my college days and would get paid with food. The best food ever! Wen we sit they'd plop down a clay pot of fresh bread and a seasonal butter: pumpkin, apple, peppermint, ginger, etc. it made a huge impression on me and still does. I guess butter is my Achilles heel.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #12 of 15


Very nice photos PP! I totally agree KK,, Compound butters just don't get used enough. They take a little skill and some time but are not that difficult.  In years past it was not at all unusual to see a finishing touch with a rosette of compound butter. Always a lovely option.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #13 of 15

this is what I use at home

http://www.paperchef.com/

I really like it, I can make the individual packets ahead of time, pop them in the oven and serve 

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousMunchkin View Post

I'm trying to find an easy way to serve white fish en papillote, but haven't quite figured out a restaurant-friendly way of staging it. It needs minimal work so my line can handle it. We aren't a grand restaurant so the customers won't want to wait too long. Any suggestions?

The fish will cook/steam quickly. You might use foil in a heart shape, but the cooking time may be a little longer.  I would keep it simple and fresh, top the fish with gremolata, a little white wine and/or a pat of butter.  Or. use very thinly sliced veggies like summer squash, zukes, onions, fennel - or asparagus.  Anything that is fresh & seasonal.  You could pipe the potatoes on the side with some paprika, to give the dish some spice and color.

 

Edit: I don't know how one would check for internal temp when prepped this way, as opening the packet will interfere with cooking/steaming.  Unless you have prepped this many times, I would go with a more traditional method of cooking. Better safe than sorry.


Edited by Cerise - 5/12/14 at 9:58am
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

 

Edit: I don't know how one would check for internal temp when prepped this way, as opening the packet will interfere with cooking/steaming.  Unless you have prepped this many times, I would go with a more traditional method of cooking. Better safe than sorry.

 

 

You're right... Sadly, fish en papillote just doesn't seem 'safe' enough for our restaurant. At home, yes that's perfectly fine and it works every time, but with our turnover rate and lack of properly trained cooks, everything needs to be fool-proof and temp-ed before leaving the kitchen.

 

Ah, it's a shame... Although, I greatly appreciate the tips for fish en papillote from everyone! Definitely one of my favorite ways to prepare fish and I look forward to trying out your ideas. :)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Fish en Papillote?