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Types of Bread

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I've just started baking properly, and following my first attempt at baking bread, I am keen to try some different varieties of bread. I started with a plain white loaf, but want to branch out into something a bit more complicated. Any suggestions or specific recipes would be very much appreciated.
post #2 of 6

Get a scale for measuring ingredients and checkout TheFreshLoaf.com.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 6

And substitute 1/6th rye or whole wheat or some exotic flour in your original recipe.  60% hydration for typical flour (mostly AP) and up to 80% for a mixture of bread flour and rye flour (no AP).

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 6

Keep your whole grain flours in the fridge in airtight containers. They can go rancid because of the oil in the germ. I've had a copy of Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book for years. Its a great reference for whole grain baking. It not only gives recipes but explains the chemistry and science of what's going on.  Maybe your library has a copy.

 

Here's a recipe I develped. It also makes good cinnamon rolls.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/high-rise-dinner-rolls/

post #5 of 6
Congrats in attempting to bake bread. As long as you follow the basic rules , knead the dough until gluten has fully developed, rest between stages, mould dough correctly, proof for the desired time and bake for the correct time and temperature you should be successful.

There are many variations of a simple white loaf, by using enriched dough, where you add fat for intricate plaited loaves, to using polenta (corn flour) to produce a nice crusty loaf. You can also produce ciabatta by adding ingredients to a poolish ( pre-fermented wet starter dough) this is my favourite bread to bake and if done correctly and if you have the time a highly satisfying bread to produce.
post #6 of 6

Hello Cjack and others..

     All my life, I've tried now and again to bake bread...by hand, mixer and bread machine.  I always followed the recipe and hoped for the best.. It usually turned out ":ok"... But I never felt I had any control or a real understanding of the process.

 

     I recently got Peter Reinhart's "The Bread Baker's Apprentice"... I feel like I have been in a baker's coma after reading that book. If you have a passion for baking, then this book will open up a new dimension to the science and art of making bread. It will give you the understanding of each step of his 12 processes in baking bread. It is not a "recipe" book. It is a culinary school level course in the science and art of making bread. I've been studying the first 48 pages, for four weeks now, memorizing terminology, definitions, processes, etc. It is all the foundation for learning control of the entire process.  The "Formula" section of the book applies what you've learned in the first section to different types of bread. This may be just what you've been looking for!

 

    There are many highly acclaimed books on the market and this is one of them. I'd say it is a great book for people who want to go beyond "recipes" and the bits and pieces we pick up from experience and really understand and control the process.

 

Happy baking!

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