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Meat fork vs tongs??? - Page 2

post #31 of 48

Tongues for majority of grill items provided you rinse them or dip them between foods.  Years ago in wholesale butcher houses we took our knives between various cuts or at lunch or break time and put them all on the bench in a strerilizing solution.   A meat fork for large roast, tongues will bend under weight.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #32 of 48

I don't think the health inspector would like you using tongues, no matter how many times you dipped them in sanitation fluid. 

post #33 of 48
Quote:
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by alaminute View Post



....

 

I swore by tongs for a long, I had a ton of tricks- pasta, soup, sticky pans. And learning to use the fork can be tough, but now I can do anything tongs can with a fork faster, cleaner more efficiently. F.Dick is the best brand I've found so far. They also make the best fish spat bar none, although I prefer a full palette knife instead but that's a discussion for another thread.

 

Well, a'la minute,

 As you can see by the pic above, My F->Dick is bigger than your F->Dick, so I guess that settles the whole debate, eh?

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #34 of 48
I use both. Chopsticks and tweezers for delicate playing also.

I'd definitely say tongs are my most used item however. Multiple pairs, never in my back pocket, definitely never with a dirty rag. In a good push, I always swap out with a clean pair often. When I get a change they all get sent to the pit and get scrubbed down good.

Have I seen cooks use dirty tongs in my years? Of course. I've also seen dirty forks used, spoons, spats, and pans.

In my honest
post #35 of 48
^^^^ opinion the use of dirty tongs, towels, pans; goes to show the personal habits of a not clean cook. And we all know some of these ^^
post #36 of 48
So in the end a true master uses the right tool for the right job. Just don't let anyone at my work here I ever advocated tongs. I've heard at the French laundry they only use palette knives...
post #37 of 48

I think totally forswearing anything in the kitchen is silly. Almost every tool has its use. What I find I don't like is the inappropriate use of tongs, using them for something they shouldn't be used for. 

 

I've seen the guys at Saison in SF in action, I know they use tongs to handle the live fire of the restaurant. Anyone working a grill or a broiler pretty much has to use tongs. 

 

But, I feel the same way about using tongs for, say, flipping fish, stirring soup, carrying hot pans around the kitchen (among other things) as I do about, say, opening a can with a chef's knife. Will it work? Probably, but its hardly the correct tool. 

 

"Correct" is subjective of course.

 

I've worked at a couple places where we were forbidden to use tongs. It was more about having finesse and care for your food, more of a mentality, then anything else. 

 

Other places I've worked, cooks used tongs for everything. Even plating salad greens, which I find abhorrent. But hey, to each his own. 

 

I usually use a combination of tweezers (the long kind), spatula and palate knives, and meat fork. 

 

And yes, they don't use tongs at TFL. But they also don't have a broiler or a grill. 

post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post
 

I don't think the health inspector would like you using tongues, no matter how many times you dipped them in sanitation fluid. 

 

Hahah!  

post #39 of 48
I think it's personal preference. Fork for steak do puncture the meat and allow jus run out. Heavy joints can't pick up with tongs. For fish there's fish slice. They should be washed periodically and not using the same fork or tong for different food. Especially between cooked and meat which are still raw inside. That's how you get cross contamination. Which ever utensil you use you got to feel comfortable with and they have to be
well made.
post #40 of 48
I have seen cooks keep stabbing steaks to get the blood out in order to force the steak to make it well done. Bad practice. Grill tong for small items like steak, chops and chicken etc. Meat fork for large joints and carving that's why they're call carving fork.
post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kookieman13 View Post

I think it's personal preference. Fork for steak do puncture the meat and allow jus run out. Heavy joints can't pick up with tongs. For fish there's fish slice. They should be washed periodically and not using the same fork or tong for different food. Especially between cooked and meat which are still raw inside. That's how you get cross contamination. Which ever utensil you use you got to feel comfortable with and they have to be
well made.

 

The notion of the meat as a water balloon does not, if you'll pardon the pun, hold water. It has been debunked by guys like McGee. Yes, sticking something into the meat will cause a small amount of liquid to come out, but it is not enough to effect the overall juiciness of the protein. Google it and do some research if you don't believe me. Next, you'll tell me that searing meat will "seal in the juices." Time to put these myths to bed, guys. 

 

Obviously, if someone is repeatedly stabbing a steak with something over and over to make it "well done," then yes, that could have an effect. That is not what we are talking about here. 

post #42 of 48
I'm with someday 100% on this one. We all know various ways to push a temp I'm sure but I have never heard of/seen anybody repeatedly stabbing a steak. Sounds like mental illness. Also there ARE different forks: sauté fork, chefs fork, and steak forks are all unique. And again I believe most people here are imagining a huge 10.5 inch steak fork- I'm talking about a simple 5 or 6 inch sauté fork. Also to reiterate what someday said, it's about finesse and mentality, absolutely.
post #43 of 48
Tweezers are cheaters chopsticks... Most things you're stabbing f$&koff huge holes in I could turn with a pair of chopsticks. Learn to use them you're chefs now put on your big boy pants (or big girl pants) Anyone that can compare a meat fork to tongs is blatantly an idiot, they're two completely different tools I might as well say hey what's better an acetylene torch or a band saw. Gawd people are weak sauce, Id threaten to stab a prep cook if he produced something of this quality.
post #44 of 48

The only time I ever use a meat fork is to carve a roast, or to turn spaghetti to make it look good on the plate. Tongs, imo, are way more versatile.

post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastmasterflex View Post

Tweezers are cheaters chopsticks... Most things you're stabbing f$&koff huge holes in I could turn with a pair of chopsticks. Learn to use them you're chefs now put on your big boy pants (or big girl pants) Anyone that can compare a meat fork to tongs is blatantly an idiot, they're two completely different tools I might as well say hey what's better an acetylene torch or a band saw. Gawd people are weak sauce, Id threaten to stab a prep cook if he produced something of this quality.

What would you stab him or her with? Your chopsticks ;)

post #46 of 48

The proper way to wear / use a towel that is tucked into the waistband is very simple.

 

However many people seem to have forgotten it.

 

The towel is used only as a 'pot-grabber' or 'hot-mit' it is never used to dry hands... never to clean anything.

 

It is kept clean and dry so you have a way to instantly grab a hot plate / item skillet etc..

 

It should be kept at the front of your waist and never used to clean you hands or dry them, that is for paper-towels.

 

Yes there is a clean and dry joke regarding anatomy in there and yes most good chefs probably use it.

 

 

 

Anything that gets dirty gets dropped on the floor.  No mistaking 'dirty' ever then!

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #47 of 48
Yes there are chopsticks with pointed end for stabbing. I know because I am Chinese.
post #48 of 48
I use tongs for a hot grill. Steaks and chops don't get mashed if you are careful. Definitely only use a fish spat for grilled fish though, sometimes with an assist from tongs to gently prop the fillet up while I turn it for a cross hatch. Now I work a saute station focused on fish and my tongs are reserved for grabbing sizzle plates out of the back of the oven or other random tasks. Spoons, tweezers and rarely my fish spat get everything done.
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