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Coffee troubles

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I'm hoping someone knows something about coffee that can help me.  In the past few months I've been having troubles with coffee.  It bothers my tummy as soon as I drink it.  I've tried drinking it with food, after food, brewing it lighter, and quitting it altogether.  I'm not a big coffee drinker, I have never drank more than 1 cup per day, 2 on rare occasion.  So it's not a matter of too much.  Quitting was a huge disaster, I felt terrible for 2 days and couldn't take it anymore.  

 

So the acidity has been bothering me.  Does anyone know of a coffee that is gentler and not so acidic?  Hubby is extremely cheap on this particular staple and buys only tubs from costco (choc ful of nuts or the kirkland brand).  The kirkland brand is particularly vile but he's unwilling to buy a more expensive brand.  I would like to get something for myself and brew it separately in a french press.  Any good suggestions?

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post #2 of 19
Have you tried drinking filter coffee instead of french-press coffee?
I remember having read an article stating that the filter takes out o lot of the nasties. I will have a look see if I still got that article somewhere.
Might be worth a try....

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post #3 of 19

Have you tried changing over to tea?  Not as much caffeine but still some and a lot less acidity.  I've recently begun exploring the world of tea and have discovered that I like it more than coffee.  Although you might have the same problem with your husband.  Good tea is expensive, but well worth it in my opinion.

post #4 of 19

I would change brands and see if that works..  Shouldn't be that much difference in cost.  I would recommend Folgers Coffee Classic Roast.  I would stay with filters, using 2 at a time would even be better. 

post #5 of 19
A friend of my husband's drinks an instant coffee, Kava, and he claims that it's a lot lower in acid
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

I'm not switching to tea, I do drink decaffeinated tea in the afternoon but I love my coffee too much to give it up - I drink so little, I wouldn't even know how to cut back, to what, half a cup lol?

 

We drink filter coffee now.  He drinks nearly the whole pot so he will continue to make his own coffee.  I used to love french press, and I don't mind going back to that, maybe pass it through a filter before it hits my cup?

 

I'm thinking about Green Mountain coffee or Illy.  

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post #7 of 19

You might try cold brewing.

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post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

You might try cold brewing.

I do that over night and then warm it up?

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post #9 of 19

It is in most likelihood not the caffeine, but rather a bad roast. Have a look at some pearl coffee from a reputable coffee roaster. Grind it fresh. Brew it just with a filter and hot water.

 

This is one of my favourites (local stuff, of course, but I am sure there are similar sources in your neigbourhood): http://www.paul-schrader.de/Perl-Kaffee

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

I'm hoping someone knows something about coffee that can help me.  In the past few months I've been having troubles with coffee.  It bothers my tummy as soon as I drink it.  I've tried drinking it with food, after food, brewing it lighter, and quitting it altogether.  I'm not a big coffee drinker, I have never drank more than 1 cup per day, 2 on rare occasion.  So it's not a matter of too much.  Quitting was a huge disaster, I felt terrible for 2 days and couldn't take it anymore.  

 

So the acidity has been bothering me.  Does anyone know of a coffee that is gentler and not so acidic?  Hubby is extremely cheap on this particular staple and buys only tubs from costco (choc ful of nuts or the kirkland brand).  The kirkland brand is particularly vile but he's unwilling to buy a more expensive brand.  I would like to get something for myself and brew it separately in a french press.  Any good suggestions?


Years ago Peet's Guatamela Coffee was, like the regime that once ruled that country, really brutal on my stomach and so I switched to some other bean.  Problem solved and I don't really know if it was the acid or caffeine content.


Edited by kokopuffs - 5/10/14 at 1:35pm

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post #11 of 19

Is coffee all that is bothering you?  After I reached a certain age (I think it was 12 -- ha ha) I started getting bothered by many acidic foods -- soda, coffee, spaghetti sauce, chili -- and have had to take acid blocking medication.  Pepcid for a long time but it stopped working and then Prilosec.  That took care the issue 100% until a doctor started warning me about the potential side affects: C.Dif and calcium deficiencies.  So now I take one at the slightest hint (or premonition) of reflux.  Like you I drink moderate amounts of coffee -- 1 1/2 cups per day -- and one coke per day.  Both cognac and bourbon are hard to tolerate but if I medicate properly then I can drink as much as I like.

post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
Yes it's just the coffee I rarely drink soda and I don't notice any adverse side effects of other foods.

Is it possible to filter French press?

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post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post                   Is it possible to filter French press?

Why not coarsen your grind?

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post #14 of 19

Life is too short for bad coffee. Splurge on something decent for yourself.

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post


I do that over night and then warm it up?


For a pot of coffee, use the usual amount of fine ground coffee and about a quarter of the amount of water that you would use if brewing it. Let it steep for 24 hours. Strain. Heat the remaining 3/4 amount of water and pour into the coffee concentrate and you are good to go.

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post #16 of 19

You probably don't have any problem with coffee...

you just have a problem with all the other crap that gets swept up off the floor which goes into that terrible bad costco crap.  

1/10th sawdust and hemp string shavings along with concrete dust and animal droppings, always ground finer than fine so you can't tell.

 

As bubba said... Life is too short for bad coffee.

 

To make certain - go out and buy a 'good' cup of coffee at a respectable place and see what that does to your tummy!

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post #17 of 19

I have the same problem with the acid-coffee tummy. 

 

Acidity in coffee most often comes from the soil environment in which it's grown. Brewing processes can increase or decrease the amount of acid that is extracted in the process, but if you start with a high acid coffee, you'll end up with a significant acid level even if you cold brew (as Cheflayne suggests.)

 

Brazil and Colombia produce the lion's share of coffee that reaches the mass market (Folgers, Maxwell, Costco etc.) and both of these are very high acid coffees.  Most large commercial coffee roasters base their blends on Columbian beans mixing in other varietals for flavor.

 

The lowest acid coffee I've found is Sumatran and some other spots in Indonesia. Others grown in highly active volcanic areas seem to have lower acid contents too-Jamaican and Hawaiian to name a couple others.

 

We sell a lot of Sumatran French Roast in our shop - big punchy flavor that's very smooth and easy on the stomach. To me, it's a little flat in flavor and I like to mix it up with some other coffees with  a touch of acid to brighten up the flavor.

Dean's Bean's-out of Boston has a delightful blend of dark and light roasted coffee called Mokka Sumatra you should try. We sell tons of it and I don't know anyone who doesn't love it. Also Larry's Beans (another small, organic and fair trade roaster) sells one called Cowboy blend that is terrific and also easy on the stomach.

 

RE: Brewing process- avoid French press in this case. The longer the coffee sits in hot water, the more caffeine, acids and other VOCs are extracted from them. Cold brew is great because the cold water process does not extract much of the acid and you get a really smooth cup-great for iced coffee too.

Cold brewing results in a thick concentrated coffee syrup that you add hot water to for a hot cup or pour over ice with milk for the best  iced coffee ever. 

 

Counterintuitively, espresso drinks tend to have big punchy flavor without a lot of caffeine or acid since steam is forced very quickly through the coffee grounds extracting the flavor compounds but not a lot of the other stuff that can be problematic to some people.

 

On a personal note- organic, shade grown, and fairly traded coffee only costs a little more than the grocery store stuff. If you buy your beans from a knowledgable independent coffee shop owner who focuses on fair trade and organics, your $$$ help small business people and their families all down the line-from the farm to your cup. 

 

Go to Dean's Beans website (http://www.deansbeans.com/) to read about Dean's efforts in the developing world to help coffee growers and their communities. His Java Trekker stories are really interesting. Nice guy too.

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post #18 of 19

Get some nice beans, grind and filter.

 

I used to get decent stuff sent over from an Amazonian tribe, top stuff - certainly recommend filter over instant.

 

Can't say I drink too much, usually three cups a week, and tea gets boring fast; few cups a month is standard for me, with exception to herbal.

post #19 of 19

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Edited by tweakz - 10/27/14 at 10:44am
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