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deep fried peanut butter

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Any one out there have any advice fro this? I've tried some low tech and high tech methods.  not having a lot of luck, peanut butter always explodes before the batter sets.  

 

does anyone have experience making pliable chocolate gel? peanut butter has a much higher fat content but I think that might work. 

 

any help anyone can give would be appreciated.

post #2 of 13

what have you tried so far and how big are the lumps of PB?  Wondering if you would have better luck if you encase a small amount in a wonton wrapper and fry that; try a low fat PB, roll it in bread crumbs instead of a batter (freeze it first),,,,

 

when you say pliable chocolate gel, do you mean like modeling chocolate? You could try using PB morsels and some white chocolate chips and see what happens - you'll have to play with the ratios to get it to work without separating or getting very greasy...

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

j,

 

I'm referring to a technique that involves iota carrageenan and 2 other hydrocolloids that make chocolate into a and edible "play dough" of sorts.  we are trying to keep the integrity of pure peanut butter here.  It is a component on a multi faceted dish involving chocolate brownie, caramel and ganache served to mimic a pint of black and tan. 

post #4 of 13

if you're trying to keep the "integrity of pure peanut butter" why then try to deepfry it.

what about making it in a mousse. or a foam even (I am pretty sure you know how to do this, since you talk about iota and hydrocolloids ;) )

post #5 of 13

There is a process by which all of the fat can be drawn from baking chips.

Those that use it call it candy clay.

Peanut butter candy clay would be prepared by adding light corn syrup to PB flavored chips (like chocolate chips only peanut butter flavored).

I have never made nor used it but the process instructions can be found by a quick 'net search I imagine.

 

mimi

 

edit.... not sure that it is the fat that leaks out but something is def coming out of those chips.

Whatever it is you end up with a firm ball of what is described as a very firm mass of chocolate or in your case peanut butter clay.

 

m.


Edited by flipflopgirl - 5/20/14 at 5:09am
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

We are getting closer.  Lechithin helped keep the fat from separating.  we got it to stick together using Kelso gel F but it turned into a liquid :( . Ill keep posting my results with photos.

post #7 of 13
Have you tried freezing the peanut butter balls before frying?
post #8 of 13
So, I get this right, what you really want is something to buy you time to crisp your lacey batter before the peanut butter melts into nothing. And you want it to come off as just warmed over peanut butter, not dense or fudgey?

My first thought was to try methocel, but it wont work that well with the fat. There is something called ethylecellulose that apparently works on fats, but I have never come across it for sale.

Have you considered trying something like seamless gnuddi? Portion the balls of PNB and completely submerge them in semolina for a day. A quick web search ought to get you several tutorials on the method. Add some xantham gum to the semolina for a firmer coating.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanMcPherson View Post

So, I get this right, what you really want is something to buy you time to crisp your lacey batter before the peanut butter melts into nothing. And you want it to come off as just warmed over peanut butter, not dense or fudgey?

My first thought was to try methocel, but it wont work that well with the fat. There is something called ethylecellulose that apparently works on fats, but I have never come across it for sale.

Have you considered trying something like seamless gnuddi? Portion the balls of PNB and completely submerge them in semolina for a day. A quick web search ought to get you several tutorials on the method. Add some xantham gum to the semolina for a firmer coating.

Thanks! Good advice.
post #10 of 13

My advice would be to melt it and thicken it up with maltodextrin . You'll have to play around a bit with it,but you should be able to get any kind of consistency that you want after frying by adjusting the quantities. And fry it with a mix of panko and graham crackers for and awesome combo with that brownie.

post #11 of 13
I am curious why you would use maltodextrin, from my experience it would certainly radically change the texture of the PNB. Now, I have only ever worked with tapioca malto, so maybe you are thinking of a different starch? The tapioca certainly would make the PNB chewy and fudgey, and it's also not very heat stable either (renders at mouth temp). If have used it to make fried liquids I would love to hear your techniques! Sounds promising, but counter intuitive to my experience.
post #12 of 13

Ha ha ha ha such fun.

 

You are right it will melt, however it will also help with the splitting problem and raise the heat tolerance(this varies depending on how much you thicken it up) by more than a bit. Combine this with the freezing method a thick crust, very hot oil and some practice it sounds doable. If it doesn't get you to the just warmed texture that the op wanted it will be pretty close I thing.

 

The only other solution that I think of would be kinda similar would doing a reverse spherification, freezing, coating and deep frying that. Although I don't know how it would turn out.

post #13 of 13
Sure, but malto isn't really a thickener, it's a bulking agent, and would certainly change the texture of peanut butter into something chewy and sticky. I do use it frequently with nut butters to make a crispy crunch type effect. I have only worked with tapioca, so I was kinda hoping you might know something about rice maltodextrin that I don't.

It you were going to do a crust on the butter, rather than a batter, you shouldn't have to modify the peanut butter at all. Coat, freeze, egg wash, coat again and freeze again, and you will be bullet proof.

still doesn't address the lacey batter question.
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