New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Lasagna - Page 2

post #31 of 47
No way...to me the trio of nutty rye, sour yet cleansing refreshing sourkraut, and salty smoky and spiced brisket is one of those perfect flavour "chords". Its seems natural to me to reconfigure them into other forms than a sandwich. The ragu is mostly stewing beef, usually blade, that I rub with typical flavours of pastrami brines and rubs. The actual deli meat I only work in as part of the cooking liquid, making a broth out of end pieces in a pressure cooker.

If you are a fan of the sandwich, this would ring your bell. I think if there is any one thing that pulls it together its the rye crumble on the top. The extra crunch just sets everything off.
post #32 of 47

Pollopicu - that mushroom lasagna looks delicious.  Any cheese in that?

post #33 of 47

Thanks, Mike. Yes, but not inside the sauce like a Mornay, it's sprinkled over each layer. The recipe is adapted, just a little from the Barefoot contessa. I used wild mushrooms instead of portobellos because i wanted a cleaner look, and nuttier flavor, and it was amazing, and now wouldn't make it any other way.

I used oyster, shittake, and baby bella mushrooms.

 

http://www.tastebook.com/recipes/872961-Portobello-Mushroom-Lasagna?full_recipe=true

 

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b160/rachelcrane1/DSC_00175714.jpg

 

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b160/rachelcrane1/DSC_00515748.jpg

 

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b160/rachelcrane1/DSC_00615758.jpg

 

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b160/rachelcrane1/DSC_00675764.jpg 

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post

Thanks, Mike. Yes, but not inside the sauce like a Mornay, it's sprinkled over each layer. The recipe is adapted, just a little from the Barefoot contessa. I used wild mushrooms instead of portobellos because i wanted a cleaner look, and nuttier flavor, and it was amazing, and now wouldn't make it any other way.
I used oyster, shittake, and baby bella mushrooms.

http://www.tastebook.com/recipes/872961-Portobello-Mushroom-Lasagna?full_recipe=true

DSC_00175714.jpg

DSC_00515748.jpg

DSC_00615758.jpg

DSC_00675764.jpg 

Oh my.
That is making my mouth water and I just finished eating a protein heavy dinner.
Awesome and thanks for the link as well.

mimi
post #35 of 47

Thanks, Mimi! 

 

Wish i could serve everyone here a slice. :)

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #36 of 47
Me too licklips.gif

mimi
post #37 of 47

Yeah. That mushroom lasagna looks awesome. Thanks Pollipicu. That's definitely my next lasagna served up with a crisp green salad and dry white Bordeaux (although a garnacha might work as well). 

 

By the way, where does your moniker/handle come from? 

post #38 of 47

Oh yeah, with a crisp green salad, and Bordeaux...you've got the idea, Jake t buds.

 

My name is from a poultry products brand in PR. Pollo meaning chicken, and picu not sure how to describe what it means exactly since it's a slang word. Perhaps, beaming? It's suppose to describe the attitude of the chicken in the logo, which is very nostalgic to me because it was a food brand everyone bought where I lived in PR, and it was always a cute name people would use to describe someone acting or looking a certain way. For example, someone fresh out of the shower with their hair wet combed to the side, dressed in their Sunday best looking very proud and a little ridiculous. People would look at them and say, "get a load of pollo picú."  :p 

 

http://www.avesyporcinos.com/imgnoticias/Aves%20y%20Porcinos_2921_2032010_Picu.jpg

 

the two L's in "pollo" sound like a Y as in yolo, instead of an L, as in Apollo. So it's pronounced poyo peekú. Hope that all makes sense.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #39 of 47
QUESTION:
My lasagna recipe calls for 1 small package
of frozen spinach, but should I cook it, or just
thaw it before using it
post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by hajg View Post

QUESTION:
My lasagna recipe calls for 1 small package
of frozen spinach, but should I cook it, or just
thaw it before using it

 

I would buy frozen whole spinach then thaw and squeeze out the liquid in paper towels (you may need to do this more than once as there seems to be an inordinate amt of liquid in frozen spinach).

Chop it up a bit then at least warm in the micro till the same temp as your sauce.

This step will ensure even cooking throughout  the dish.

 

mimi

 

Why whole and not chopped spinach?

During the squeezing you run the chance of wasting some as the pieces will stick to the towel and are almost impossible to scrape off (ask me how I know ;) lol).

 

m.

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by hajg View Post

QUESTION:
My lasagna recipe calls for 1 small package
of frozen spinach, but should I cook it, or just
thaw it before using it


Thaw the spinach and combine it with ricotta, mozzarella and an egg. Spread the mixture over cooked noodles and bake.

post #42 of 47

Be sure to heed Mimi's advice and squeeze that thawed spinach within an inch of its life. Also, if your recipe doesn't already call for it, a light grating of nutmeg into that spinach/ricotta mixture makes a huge and delicious difference. Not a ton. Just a whisper.

post #43 of 47
For squeezing spinach it really helps to use a thin cloth. I've used server napkins in the past, that way you can really get a good spin on it, regular towels will rip if you try this with them.
post #44 of 47

I just squeeze it with my bare hands, a handful at a time. I can get it almost as dry as using a towel. But I'm only doing one box. If I needed to do a large quantity it would be faster to use a  cloth tea towel.

 

Do you know what I mean by a tea towel? It's what grandmas in my area call the lint free, thin cotton towels used for wiping glasses or covering bread while proofing. Usually hand embroidered with days of the week, fruits and vegetables, ect. In the past girls made them for their hope chests. Not many hope chests these days, or girls who embroider, so now grandmas give them as engagement and wedding gifts.

post #45 of 47

I vote to nix the frozen and use fresh. it takes the same amount of time to prepare. Not only is whole frozen tasteless and tough. You can choke on it.

Just me though. I would never think to add cheap frozen spinach to expensive ricotta.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #46 of 47

hi!

I live quite near Bologna, so lasagne alla bolognese in my heart :°D so only meat ragu', home made bechamel and grated parmigiano reggiano inside egg pasta.

 

 

 

but I also like and prepare different kind, my favourites:

 

-with pumpkin pesto and cheese - love it

-with spinach/chard and ricotta

-with mixed vegetables and bechamel

-with salted crepes instead off egg pasta (in italy we call them crespelle)

post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

I vote to nix the frozen and use fresh. it takes the same amount of time to prepare. Not only is whole frozen tasteless and tough. You can choke on it.

Just me though. I would never think to add cheap frozen spinach to expensive ricotta.


Now that you mention it ....:)

 

mimi

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking