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Spanakopita

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
I recently discovered this treat. I found a recipe in Health magazine and tried it out. It uses spinach, feta, romano, salt, peper, nutmeg, and an egg white. What ingredients do you use? I was thinking of kicking it up a notch with scallions. Just curious as to what you guys use.
post #2 of 37
These are a favorite of mine! I don't use Romano, and I use a whole egg and hold off on the salt as most feta I've used is salty enough. The nutmeg is a nice touch. I've wanted to try using a bit of chopped Roma tomato pulp, but I'm worried it may be too wet for the phyllo. Scallions would be nice; I'd think about sauteing them a bit to take out some of their moisture. BTW, if you're putting cheese in them, I believe they're officially spanakotiropitas (tiro = cheese in Greek). Are you making one big pie or triangles? I make both large pies and triangles of meal size and hor d'oeuvre size.

[ May 31, 2001: Message edited by: Mezzaluna ]
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post #3 of 37
ummm...a family favorite! here's our recipe handed down from Yiayia(grandmother): spinach, eggs, feta, green onions(we don't saute ours), fresh dill, white pepper. For ease we use chopped frozen spinach - be sure to squeeze out all the water. Always use fresh phyllo dough, not previously frozen. And we alway use unsalted butter to butter the sheets.
post #4 of 37
Dear Svadisthana:

Spanakopita is my most favorite dish!

I have to admit that I am very proud of my Spinach Pie recipe. To see my recipe follow this link: http://www.olivetree.cc/RECspinach.htm

I hope you like it.
"Olio nuovo e vino vecchio"
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"Olio nuovo e vino vecchio"
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post #5 of 37
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for the recipes and suggestions. I made some today with the scallions(sauteed)and they were fabulous. I think it was mostly the fresh spinach from the farmers market I got yesterday. I have always made them into the little triangles, never a pie.

Papa,
I will be trying your recipe soon! It sounds wonderful. :D
post #6 of 37
Dear Papa,

I'm finally printing out a bunch of recipes this morning - now that I finally bought some paper. I have to say, I just love your website!!! What wonderful recipes - I look forward to making your spinach pie.
post #7 of 37

Frozen spanakopita: Two weeks ago I made spanakopita triangles, approximately 40. I wrapped most of them in saran, arranged them in a freezer bag, and stowed them in the freezer compartment at the bottom of my fridge. Now, tonight, I want to re-heat a half-dozen or so; this will be a first for me. So—how do I go about it? Should they be thawed first? Can they be sautéed in butter and olive oil? Would it be better to re-heat them in the oven, and, if so, at what temperature and upon which rack (lower, middle, upper?) and for how long? If I reheat in the oven would it make sense to brush the surfaces with a little clarified butter?

     And, just a brief note about store-bought frozen phyllo sheets. I've never had a problem with them. I've used supermarket phyllo for spanakopita and baclava on a number of occasions and been perfectly happy with the results. Two things to remember: 1. begin thawing the phyllo, in the fridge, at least the day before you plan to use it; a full 24 hours thawing time is not too much. Properly thawed the ultra-thin sheets will separate one from the other without sticking; 2. As you work try to keep the stack of sheets covered with a clean, slightly damp, cloth (exposed to the air, phyllo quickly dries out.)

      But—how am I to deal with my frozen spinach pies?

                                                 G-man

post #8 of 37

Take out what you need put on parchment paper brush with butter and bake till golden brown. Can be done from fridge or frozen state. Dont overcook

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #9 of 37
Agreed cook from frozen state. No need to thaw

You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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post #10 of 37

We make our own phyllo/strudel leaf for burek, anyone else?

post #11 of 37

No way I make my own stan. but buy the phyllo. We make to many and its to time consuming. And there is no way I could get layers that thin without special equipment.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #12 of 37

I'm no good at making pastry dough so I wouldn't dream of making my own phyllo.  I do wish there was better phyllo on the market however, the only phyllo and puff pastry I find is processed and has too many ingredients in it that I can't pronounce.  Tastes good though.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #13 of 37

post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

No way I make my own stan. but buy the phyllo. We make to many and its to time consuming. And there is no way I could get layers that thin without special equipment.

All you need is a big table and some good music700

I made this span in kendal flo for the greek easter celebration.My wife made and pulled the pastry, we did not want a roll so I cut it into squares.

post #15 of 37

What you are showing is puff paste not phylo. Let me see you roll out phylo. Puff dough is easy. Roll out dot/ rest roll out dot rest 3 times let rest then roll and use. Phylo doesn't work like that. You really have to run it through a machine. Also to get more circles out of it start cutting them at siide not center of dough.and work around.

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #16 of 37

Wow, that's an amazing video!  You really have to have a talent for working with dough, if I even walked into that room without touching it it would start tearing.  I'm so impressed with how quickly and easily you worked that dough.  What was the filling that you put in it?  I really enjoyed watching that although as a pro musician I take offense to that music being called "good" lol.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #17 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post

What you are showing is puff paste not phylo. Let me see you roll out phylo. Puff dough is easy. Roll out dot/ rest roll out dot rest 3 times let rest then roll and use. Phylo doesn't work like that. You really have to run it through a machine. Also to get more circles out of it start cutting them at siide not center of dough.and work around.

 

Do you know how mean that sounds?  Let me see YOU roll out phyllo.  It's sooooooo easy to criticize isn't it?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post

What you are showing is puff paste not phylo. Let me see you roll out phylo. Puff dough is easy. Roll out dot/ rest roll out dot rest 3 times let rest then roll and use. Phylo doesn't work like that. You really have to run it through a machine. Also to get more circles out of it start cutting them at siide not center of dough.and work around.

Both the vid and the photo are called strudel or phylo leaf.I was taught to make puff pastry in Paris 40 yrs ago using three diff methods of lamination.

The paste the leaf is made out of is just oil, flour,and water is that how you make your puff?

post #19 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post

What you are showing is puff paste not phylo. Let me see you roll out phylo. Puff dough is easy. Roll out dot/ rest roll out dot rest 3 times let rest then roll and use. Phylo doesn't work like that. You really have to run it through a machine. Also to get more circles out of it start cutting them at siide not center of dough.and work around.

Oh I also wanted to add check out Burek Sa Sirom before you stick your foot father in the hole, sa sirom is a mixture of feta, cream cheese and egg yolks that is what the guy is dotting on the phyllo leaf.

post #20 of 37

Here you go ED more puff pastry making

post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kippers View Post

Oh I also wanted to add check out Burek Sa Sirom before you stick your foot father in the hole, sa sirom is a mixture of feta, cream cheese and egg yolks that is what the guy is dotting on the phyllo leaf.

 

Oh, that's not you making it?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #22 of 37

700

Nah this is me out on the lash with my wife.

post #23 of 37

I have a recipe from a 42 yr old Greek cook book.  I don't dare kick it up as it is perfect as is.  So is the recipe for Pastitsio - there is nothing to fix.  Skardalia, Tzatziki, Tarama Salata, Mussaka -  it's all good and was all well thought out time back way back. 

post #24 of 37

Miss Koukouvagia

  As I said above I would never make it without special equipment. I would make a puff pastry and have done so many times even though I can buy it made. Why? because I prefer to make mine with real butter. And I am not being mean just stating what I think it is having handled the stuff over and over for years ,  Phylo dough can not be laid out like this as without constantly brushing with oil  1. it wiuld dry out an.d crack. 2. It would not lay down over table like this without breaking.  Perhaps if you did make pastry in the past you would see this for yourself.

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post

Miss Koukouvagia

  As I said above I would never make it without special equipment. I would make a puff pastry and have done so many times even though I can buy it made. Why? because I prefer to make mine with real butter. And I am not being mean just stating what I think it is having handled the stuff over and over for years ,  Phylo dough can not be laid out like this as without constantly brushing with oil  1. it wiuld dry out an.d crack. 2. It would not lay down over table like this without breaking.  Perhaps if you did make pastry in the past you would see this for yourself.

 

Regardless of what you would call it or how it is made, laying out dough like that is quite remarkable in itself.  I don't know anything about pastry which is probably why I am impressed.  I can't even make an apple pie (tried!)  I did however think that the video was of Kippers rolling out the dough and I see now that it was not.  So who rolled out that dough and what was in it?  We'll never know I guess.  I do think that it is easy to criticize and negativity is not charming.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #26 of 37

Here is a Bosnian lady making meat burek using home made phyllo or leaf.The dough consist of flour, water and oil after kneading and resting it becomes very pliable.The pictures I have of our home made leaf and Burek are in my photobucket acc and I cannot post them for some reason. Help please.EB have you ever tasted Burek?  .

post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post

Miss Koukouvagia

  As I said above I would never make it without special equipment. I would make a puff pastry and have done so many times even though I can buy it made. Why? because I prefer to make mine with real butter. And I am not being mean just stating what I think it is having handled the stuff over and over for years ,  Phylo dough can not be laid out like this as without constantly brushing with oil  1. it wiuld dry out an.d crack. 2. It would not lay down over table like this without breaking.  Perhaps if you did make pastry in the past you would see this for yourself.

You better tell this Greek bakery worker that it cannot be done.

post #28 of 37

And so you know Puff Paste here in USA  is  layers of dough dotted with butter or shortening and contains no oil  and is turned 3 times. and rested between each turn and re rolled .  Phylo is a far cry from this. Authentic strudel leaves from Bavaria and Germany is the way you describe and is so thin that it is usually rolled out on canvas. so it does not tear a lot. If you notice in the picture above with the man in it , when he rolled it  even in canvas it starts to tear, Here in America both Puff paste and some strudel dough are put in a machine called a Sheeter. Phylo tears easily and is usually worked on awith oil brushed on it so it does not dry out. Puff Paste is not. 

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #29 of 37

Phyllo, Filo, Strudel leaf are all the same recipe. They are Turkish in origin and were spread through Europe by the Ottoman Empire.

EB you do seem to want to pontificate about something you patently know very little about.

Clic on this link and then you may learn something.http://www.bakeinfo.co.nz/Facts/Pastry/Filo-pastry

I was taught Patisserie in Paris 37 yrs ago. I worked in a bakery in Frejus after that.

post #30 of 37

Everyone knows they are all the same , you don't have to be a brain surgeon to know that. Bring up Puff pastry and you may learn something to. And not to brag but I served my apprenticeship in the Hotel Negresco in Niece over 47 years ago . So what.

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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