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Steak cooking?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I wondered if anyone can give me advice on steak cooking. This is for home use I don't cook the steaks at work yet.

A couple of things.  First of all is it a good idea to tenderise the steak before use?  I thought it was but I'm not sure if it makes it to thin.

Secondly resting.  I generally put the oven on about 50 degrees c and put the steak on a plate and out some foil over it after cooking. I did put it on a rack originally but again it seems to go dry because all the juices go out of it.

Next thing I wondered about is the cooking method.  Personally I prefer a pan to grill because it seems to dry out on a chargrill.  I seal the juices in by cooking it really hot then turn it down a bit.  Is that a good idea or is it better to keep it at a constant hot heat?

post #2 of 15

Ok - I hope Kenji doesn't take offense and start sending me bills for type copy... but anyway.

 

This will hopefully save everyone a lot of time... read them.  Understand them.  Then you can get all Zen about Steak.

 

Myths and Wives Tales about Steak

 

now that is out of the way here are the traditional methods

 

Pan-Seared Steaks  and

 

Grilled Steaks

 

Onto the Art and Zen topics:

 

Types of steaks

 

Home Dry Aging of Steak

 

Why Cook Sous-Vide Steaks?

 

Life-Hacker Style Sous-Vide Steak with not much $$

 

GBD in simple terms

 

Blood and Resting - Fat in Meat vs Water

 

There are many more but these should get you started down the right path and for goodness sakes... help others with searches.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

MMM I read the article about resting meat and not sure if I believe that. I mean all the best chefs in the world including the molecular gastronomy chefs all say to rest it.

post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBristol View Post
 

MMM I read the article about resting meat and not sure if I believe that. I mean all the best chefs in the world including the molecular gastronomy chefs all say to rest it.

 

up until recently they all said to 'never wash' mushrooms either because they soak up water...

 

caramelized onions also always started in butter / oil as it was the only way to do it right...

 

... now we know better don't we.

 

A very old one that was busted many many years ago - seafood and cheese don't mix.... 

 

PS with sous-vide cooking, unless you are low temp - braising, there is no need to rest the meat.   There is no hold-over cooking and nothing is re-adsorbed.   I do concede though that none of the major players have it truly figured out, they all 'guess' (and differently may I add) the science behind it.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #5 of 15
As much as I love Amazingribs, I did think the meat resting article wasn't nearly as conclusive as the author seems to think it is. His entire thesis is based on moisture retension, something I am not convinced is the only thing in play in resting. Even if it is, I don't think we can be sure that all lost "juice" is created equal. The liquids lost are going to be a solution, and I wonder if resting meat allows for the elements in that solution (which are going to have different viscosity sensitivities to temp, like gelatin) to set and separate from that solution as it cools. It might not be the amount of liquid escaping, but the quality of it that matters. Just a thought.
post #6 of 15

The reason behind the need for resting is mainly for carryover heat to work. Otherwise you can be eating unsafe meat.

 

SV requires no resting because there is no such thing as carryover heat in SV.

 

dcarch

post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanMcPherson View Post

As much as I love Amazingribs, I did think the meat resting article wasn't nearly as conclusive as the author seems to think it is. His entire thesis is based on moisture retension, something I am not convinced is the only thing in play in resting. Even if it is, I don't think we can be sure that all lost "juice" is created equal. The liquids lost are going to be a solution, and I wonder if resting meat allows for the elements in that solution (which are going to have different viscosity sensitivities to temp, like gelatin) to set and separate from that solution as it cools. It might not be the amount of liquid escaping, but the quality of it that matters. Just a thought.

 

 

I agree Allan... that is why it put it in the Zen... seems right but not exactly 'proven'... more to be found out i'm hoping.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #8 of 15
I will say I personally find unrested roasted/grilled/pan fryed meats (especially red meats) come off much less pleasent in texture and chew. At least to my taste. Maybe this cannot be attributed to the conventional wisdom, I have seen lots of common sense solutions or best practices go by the boards in my life. If the prime actor in resting is more about temp equilibrium (again, note the if) it makes me wonder where that unpleasentness comes from. I wonder if it could be one of those mouth illusions, that biting and chewing through a single piece of meat with a "wide" temp range confuses the palate.

I do enjoy hot elements on a cold salad but in these cases the hot and cold items will have very different textures, so that might be why that gets a pass.

No matter what, I still think resting is best practice, but it is interesting to consider new reasons why that might be!
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 

Just an idea if you were to rest a steak but wrap it in cling film,is it possible it may be nicer?  Because the muscles would have time to relax but you retain more juices. A chef told me to wrap chicken in clingfilm before blast chilling it and it is really nice.

post #10 of 15

@ChrisBristol

You'd end up with a soggy mess on the outside instead of a crust and carry over cooking would be increased. 

 

Try hot water bathing / poaching that chicken in a marinade / broth of soya sauce, maple syrup and water.   Bring to 140F and hold for 35 minutes.   Remove pat dry and sear quickly.

 

Now that is moist, tender and full of flavour.

 

@AllanMcPherson  I've always wondered if a freshly grilled steak had some sort of VOC's that need to dissipate before eating to provide the max flavour.  Hence the subtle differences using coal, charcoal, live wood, gas and even the dreaded blue kingsford briquette. 

 

I agree about the differences between lost juices and lost juices and lost fats etc.   I honestly don't even think anyone has ever put them thru a centerfuge and actually determined what's all 'really' in there.  

 

Might be the impetus for me to buy a bench top model. LOL -  I should probably wait as i'm getting my 2 Searzall attachments next month from kickstarter support.  Can't wait ... no more torch taste.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #11 of 15
I have an aunt who works in a university lab, I keep on her about letting me run loose! Halifax is a university town, one of our schools has a prominant food science faculty, I was actually a librarian there years (and a life) ago. It would be a dream of mine to double my careers up and have a chance to work with some of these fine folks to really dig into some of this stuff.

Please post a review of the searzall, it looks like it has the potential for some cool stuff!

Al
post #12 of 15

Here is my review:

 

1. The idea of converting torch flame to infrared is not new. You can find one in a camping store. I don't think it is patentable.

 

2. We all know that new propane cylinder torch does not work well upside down.

 

3. It does not seem to work fast. I am not sure regular propane torch is hot enough. May be Mapp gas, which is more expensive. May be a special torch head with higher output.

 

4. I can't believe they cannot make a better looking prototype.

 

dcarch

post #13 of 15

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Edited by tweakz - 10/27/14 at 10:41am
post #14 of 15

I will surely do a review when I get the device... I've already planned on it.

 

@dcarch  the ones shown on Kickstarter and Cooking Issues were hand-made buy Dave and Crew - so it's no wonder they looked pretty bad.

 

here is the Production Prototype.

 

 

 

 

Taken apart for cleaning / inspection...

 

New Torch / Bushing and Thumbscrew Connections


They have also now pretty much come out and said - you must for best results and stability use a BernzOmatic TS8000 torch head and the big fat 16 oz Camping Gas cylinders.  As Bernzomatic puts it 

Quote:

Large, optimized swirl flame burns hotter. High intensity flame for maximum heat output provides 30% faster soldering time.

 

 

Anyway I'll post what I find ... happy to answer questions and willing to share.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweakz View Post
 

 

Even a cheap Eye Round steak can be perfectly tender if cooked right. The benefit of mechanical tenderizing for me is faster cooking and more uniformly cooked chicken breast.

 

Please don't forget ... if you mechanically tenderize any whole muscle meat you must then treat it the same as ground meat.  ie. you may have introduced foreign substances into it.

 

imho - it's all around a bad idea to MT any steak, fillet, chop or roast.   Just learn to cook and slice it proper.

 

The texture comes out all wrong also in my opinion.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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