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Identify dried asian fish

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

I see at my asian market a bag of dried fish.  They're small, if I recall only a few inches in length and are all dried.  A professional chef mentioned that they're used in soups.  Does anyone have any information about this?  Their name?

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #2 of 23
Wow, that's a good question koko... I know what you mean, I use to buy them all the time in Hawaii. Like little sardines, yeah? Quite pungent and tasty..
post #3 of 23

I think that's more Japanese which is not my Asian expertise.

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post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 

FWIW the market is owned by a Korean couple and sells things from Korea all the way to Indonesia.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 

Possibly bonito as described here.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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post #6 of 23

I'm inclined to say dried small anchovies. 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

I'm inclined to say dried small anchovies. 


Why anchovies when my google search seems to show only bonito (and seaweed) as the base for many japanese soups.   :look: 

 

But I'm also seeing horse mackerel, barracuda, and sea slug.   Hmmm, it might appear that bonito is the most common over here.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #8 of 23
That was my thought too, but isn't Bonita dried shrimp?
post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

That was my thought too, but isn't Bonita dried shrimp?


Do a google search on bonito.  Note the spelling.

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-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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post #10 of 23
Oops, auto spell
Love hot rice and seaweed (furikake) and bonito, oh and shoyu, I can make a meal of that, well maybe a fried egg on top too...
post #11 of 23

Dried bonito flakes (bonito katsuobushi flakes) are the base of dashi and many Japanese soups. Whole small dried anchovies are more chinese. A pick could solve the mistery!

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

Oops, auto spell
Love hot rice and seaweed (furikake) and bonito, oh and shoyu, I can make a meal of that, well maybe a fried egg on top too...


Is the egg beaten then cooked in a broth or fried like an omelette?


Edited by kokopuffs - 5/24/14 at 10:34am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

Dried bonito flakes (bonito katsuobushi flakes) are the base of dashi and many Japanese soups. Whole small dried anchovies are more chinese. A pick could solve the mistery!


A quick google shows that dried anchovies are "more" Korean.  (EDIT) Checkout myulchi bokkeum.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #14 of 23

Sure. Can be. Our Chinese markets are full of Korean products. I even bought Korean panko last weak, at a convenient price!

I guess small dried fish is spread all over Asia.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

Oops, auto spell

Love hot rice and seaweed (furikake) and bonito, oh and shoyu, I can make a meal of that, well maybe a fried egg on top too...


Is the egg beaten then cooked in a broth or fried like an omelette?

Koko, a simple pan fried egg, over easy for me please
post #16 of 23


I took this picture at our local Korean grocery store H-Mart. Could this be what you are thinking of?

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by B.Adams View Post
I took this picture at our local Korean grocery store H-Mart. Could this be what you are thinking of?

I think I remember the dried fish being a light brown color and I'm sure that dried fish come in a variety of colors!   8)

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #18 of 23

Maybe they are ikan teri?

Indonesian dried fish, eaten as they as with a meal (just one or 2)

I will go through my Indonesian books and have a look see.

 

If it would be at an African shop, they would be Kapenta, small dried anchovies, a staple food here

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post #19 of 23

I keep these on hand, but they are real easy to identify.  They look like shrimp, and it says so on the package:

 

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post #20 of 23

Reading Japanese Cooking yesterday night i found this:

 

Quote

Sardine Stock

(Niboshi Dashi)

 

A type of fish stock is made from small sun-dried sardines called niboshi. Wooden or basketwork drying pallets on quays, spread full of these tiny silvery fish, are a part of fishing village scenes in Japan. Savory sardine stock is much stronger than bonito dashi and makes a very good base for thick and rich miso soups. It is also often used in broth for udon noodles. Niboshi vary considerable in size: about 2 inches (5 cm.) is average, Good quality niboshi should have whole bodies that are relatively straight and well formed.

 

Google pick

 

In Argentina, a common appetizer is Cornalitos fritos (fried cornalitos), being cornalito a variety of Odontesthes incisa fish (wiki info). These are fried from raw, not dried.

 

Google pick

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #21 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

I keep these on hand, but they are real easy to identify.  They look like shrimp, and it says so on the package:

 


I just got a bag of dried shrimp and am doing a google search on dashi and asian stocks.  Will let you know!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #22 of 23

The really small ones, dried anchovies, can be pounded into various pastes for various dishes - Thai, Korean, Vietnamese at least.

post #23 of 23
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