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What would you like to get from Japan? - Page 2

post #31 of 49

So what's your point Hiro?

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #32 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

So what's your point Hiro?


I was wondering what you guys know about Japan and its culture. So far you guys really blow my mind because you know a lot about Japanese culture maybe more than Japanese people know about! 

post #33 of 49

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Edited by tweakz - 10/27/14 at 10:35am
post #34 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweakz View Post
 

Yes real: I've seen many times that we can't even get real wasabi here in the states. Some of the stuff we have here even has aluminum in it. I'm even scared to eat the pickled ginger because they add aspartame to it. So yeah; real wasabi gently warmed up by Fukushima. If I want that stuff; gotta make it myself (not hard, but wasabi not real either).

 

I'd also like one of those giant jelly fishes to make the ultimate pbj.

 

I wonder how Japanese Giant Hornet larvae would taste. Would they still be edible if I'm allergic to their stings?

Why would you put aluminium in Wasabi for....I don't get it but that make me doesn't want to eat Wasabi in the states.  I haven't eaten either Giant jelly fish or Japanese Giant Hornet larvae so I can't not comment to that.. haha
 

post #35 of 49

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Edited by tweakz - 10/27/14 at 10:36am
post #36 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweakz View Post
 

Potassium aluminum sulfate can be used for leavening, or deodorizing. I'm not sure which in this case, but leavening doesn't seem practical.

 

Here is the crap they put in some commercial wasabi in the usa:

 

Water, sorbitol, glucose, rapeseed oil, salt, cornstarch, horseradish, mustard, wheat, aluminum potassium sulfate, spice extract (mustard), sodium hydroxide, xanthan gum, artificial color (FD&C Blue #1).  - http://wasabireviews.com/

 

There's a lot of controversy over rapeseed (canola), and to me it tastes and smells like crap (literally); so why use it?

  

Hi Teakz,
Thank you for the info about wasabi with chemicals.

I've seen this package when I was in Hawaii, but luckily I didn't get this one and instead I got imported one from Nijiya super market.

The wasabi in the links taste fake to me, it's not spicy and the taste seems wrong to me...

I found authentic wasabi but they are expensive!! About 40 USD for 2 pieces

 

http://item.rakuten.co.jp/i-kappa/honwasabi-kiri/

post #37 of 49

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Edited by tweakz - 10/27/14 at 10:36am
post #38 of 49

I appreciate Japanese paper because I am a hand papermaker and the first method I learned was Japanese, using Japanese Kozo fibers. I also learned Suminigashi paper marbling about the same time.

 

I would daydream about using the paper to make prints or bind into books. I learned a few Japanese bookbinding techniques many years ago. I say daydream because I haven't actually made prints or bound books in awhile. No time. I also do a bit of book repair/conservation from time to time, just for friends, and Japanese papers are used extensively by book conservators because they are so lightweight and strong.

 

There are many things I appreciate about Japanese culture. Several of my favorite filmmakers are Japanese--Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Ozu.

 

There was a Japanese store here in Chicago that just closed after many years. Toguri Mercantile Exchange. Even there I was never able to find Bonito flakes or Matcha powder (I want it to make green tea ice cream.)

 

The store was owned by the family of the infamous Tokyo Rose, who died here in Chicago in 2006.

post #39 of 49

Fascinating to know that about you Terry. 

I have some odd pieces from Firenze which I used not that long ago for lining boxes. I'll post a pic for you of what I have used. I have never seen any paper from Japan and I would imagine that it's exquisite.

 

 

@ Hiro : 

Well since you asked, which is very kind of you by the way , would love to have a piece of jewlery from mikimoto, namely the spring ring here in this link. 

http://www.mikimotoamerica.com/collections/mikimoto-exclusives/spring-ring.html

2) A couple of bottles of Juyondai Sake

3) Bag of Gyokuro tea

4) box of Kaki

5) jar of umeboshi

Petals
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Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #40 of 49

A nice Yaseu Ham radio at japanese prices(lot cheaper there than here), pass on any food, to big of a chance it is Fuku contaminated.

post #41 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweakz View Post
 

I spend about ~$13 for maki rolls (enough to satisfy hunger) downtown. $40 usd doesn't seem unreasonable in the very small amount I use at a time. Truffles ares said to be the most expensive food, so why is it so hard to get real wasabi in the US?

 

I have the equipment to make maki rolls, but for the price downtown within walking distance; it's hard to bring myself now.

 

ps: skip the Geishas (left overs) and send me some kitchen slaves. Apparently the definition of Geisha has evolved btw.

 

Maybe the reason it is so hard to get real wasabi in the U.S is that the Wasabi plant is grown at nature, I mean it grows in the small rivers which has pure clean water on the mountain side. I think it could be imported too but keeping it fresh might be hard since it doesn't last too long.

post #42 of 49

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Edited by tweakz - 10/27/14 at 10:33am
post #43 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoTerry View Post
 

I appreciate Japanese paper because I am a hand papermaker and the first method I learned was Japanese, using Japanese Kozo fibers. I also learned Suminigashi paper marbling about the same time.

 

I would daydream about using the paper to make prints or bind into books. I learned a few Japanese bookbinding techniques many years ago. I say daydream because I haven't actually made prints or bound books in awhile. No time. I also do a bit of book repair/conservation from time to time, just for friends, and Japanese papers are used extensively by book conservators because they are so lightweight and strong.

 

There are many things I appreciate about Japanese culture. Several of my favorite filmmakers are Japanese--Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Ozu.

 

There was a Japanese store here in Chicago that just closed after many years. Toguri Mercantile Exchange. Even there I was never able to find Bonito flakes or Matcha powder (I want it to make green tea ice cream.)

 

The store was owned by the family of the infamous Tokyo Rose, who died here in Chicago in 2006.

I have experienced the Japanese paper making when I was a child at a school trip or something but I don't remember much about it....

I found some macha powder on Amazon.com but I don't know how good they are. Macha Ice cream is my favourite!!!

post #44 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post
 

Fascinating to know that about you Terry. 

I have some odd pieces from Firenze which I used not that long ago for lining boxes. I'll post a pic for you of what I have used. I have never seen any paper from Japan and I would imagine that it's exquisite.

 

 

@ Hiro : 

Well since you asked, which is very kind of you by the way , would love to have a piece of jewlery from mikimoto, namely the spring ring here in this link. 

http://www.mikimotoamerica.com/collections/mikimoto-exclusives/spring-ring.html

2) A couple of bottles of Juyondai Sake

3) Bag of Gyokuro tea

4) box of Kaki

5) jar of umeboshi

 

Are you serious about getting this Mikimoto jewellery ? I don't see a price for it , it must be expensive! haha

The cheapest one would be jar of Umeboshi which my grandma made! 

post #45 of 49
Hiro, we can dream about beautiful things but nothing comes close to the word beautiful but then to be sitting under the cherry trees in full bloom.

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Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #46 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

Hiro, we can dream about beautiful things but nothing comes close to the word beautiful but then to be sitting under the cherry trees in full bloom.

 

I was away from Japan for four years and I saw full bloomed cherry trees this spring. I felt that I was really lucky to be born as a Japanese and living in such a beautiful country!

post #47 of 49
You truly are Hiro.

Visiting Japan is a goal of mine . Doing hanami in a gorgeous spot with a lunch would be wonderful.

Petals
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Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #48 of 49

Petals, I would love to see the Firenze papers--and the boxes you lined. Italian (and French) decorative papers are fabulous and I love boxes.  I made a few boxes years ago, when I had access to equipment that reliably cut boards at right angles but it's too frustrating to try to do freehand with a knife and a ruler.

 

Hiro--Here's a little bit of information about Japanese paper and papermaking. It's a dying craft, I'm afraid.

 

 

http://www.japanesepaperplace.com/abt-japanese-paper/about-washi.htm

 

And a brief video of paper being made:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vjw1qMQrE4I

post #49 of 49
Kobe wagyu. And some custom Damascus knives made by a custom sword maker.
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