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Upping minimum wage for fast food employees

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

You knew that someone was going to take on this subject real soon.

So without further adieu I will take up the issue.

 

Where on God's green earth did common sense go?

 

$15.00 an hour to flip burgers and pull fried items when an alarm goes off?

 

Fast food places are not meant to be a lifelong job.

It is meant to be a job for young people to get their feet wet in the job market and for retirees to make a little extra cash in their golden years.

 

I can not get my mind around this mentality.

 

Somebody help me!!

post #2 of 23

I would jump on this but....

Politics and labor unions and ginning the liberal base for the midterm elections are all verboten subjects on CT.

So I won't comment.

 

mimi

post #3 of 23
I hope they up it and bring the fast food industry to its knees. Maybe this time it will cripple the economy badly enough my firearm purchases will be justified.
post #4 of 23

Ah, wtf, paint it all black.

 

Look, ya don't need a minimum wage.  Yes, you do need a starting point to pay a kid with "0" experience  who shows up 10 mins late for his/her shift and fully expects to be rewarded for just showing up.

 

What you need is a series of qualifications.  Pass this qualification, get a pay increase.

 

You can't really talk about Unions, for the simple fact that the Unions have done didly-squat for the industry.  They just exist to leach off of paychecks, they don't contribute anything, never have either.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 23

.


Edited by tweakz - 10/27/14 at 10:39am
post #6 of 23

$15.00 an hour for McDonald or Wendy's  ?Insanity  Your burger and their families burgers will sell for $4.95.  In my dealings with them I find a good 1/2 of them don't understand The English language . I ordered a thick shake at Wendy' the guy said They don't have any ,People on the line looked at each other? The kid said all we have is thick frosties???I also ordered 2 cheese burgers and he asked me if I wanted cheese???  Lord help us.

   If this $15 is pushed the stores will work completely robotic

Its getting that way anyway. So then none of them will have a job. The robots will make fewer errors.

 

And don't start me on Unions, in their day they were good but they soon became the downfall of the American economy., So all our manufacturing went out of country.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #7 of 23
The hubs works in the petrol support industry.
Hard to explain exactly what it is they manufacture.
Took me three years to understand lol.
Anyways he can train a monkey to run those machines .
He starts his new guys out at $18/ hr plus great insurance (free)' paid vacation and holidays.
They are already griping if a kid gets $15/ hr to stand in the A/C and flip burgers then the law should include everyone else gets a raise to "even the score" .
Might as well shut those machines down now.
Hell might as well shut the country down now.

mimi
post #8 of 23

Think what you will of me for this but I'm past the age where I really give a flying........................

 

There has been a centuries long battle between workforce, compensation and industry's effort to reduce or eliminate the prior two. This won't be solved here or anywhere else in the near future unless we see "second coming" type changes in philosophy and attitude from all parties. I've said it before and I'll say it again, all good business decisions are not good for business.....plus........I really bought into the whole 80's-90's pyramid concept and not because I'm a gullible drone! It's because I've seen it work very successfully in business. I just can't understand what happened to all the effort we put into this back then. Guess it has something to do with the "entitlement mentality" of most of the Boomers. Remember, I'm a boomer too and I would add.........not very proud of that.

 

When I started in the industry, it was 1977 and my wage was $2.10hr. This was minimum wage and entry level at a Chicago burbs Pizza place. With-in 3 months I was making $3hr. It was great to be 16 with money in my pocket but at that time gas was $0.65 a gallon, a basic car was 2-3 grand (still way beyond my grasp) a movie was $1.50, a Friday night date was less than $10, a whopper was $0.65 and a coke was $0.25.....about all a 16 year old could care about. Fast forward 6 short years and that was upped to $7.50 when I started for a red and white themed place. By 1985 it was $10hr with 20 hours guaranteed OT but by then I had a car payment, apartment at $400 month and all the personal expenses of living alone. It wasn't bad but I wasn't saving much either.

 

Given the volatility of the industry and the waining availability of jobs as the Exec in certain markets, when I last was a line cook, it was for $13.75 with 5hrs guaranteed OT and that was as recently as 2001. In salary mode, I've earned...well....that's my business but it was a solid number but worked out to be much less given the amount of hours....that was my choice.

 

While I understand and agree with the thought process of entry level fast food not being intended to be a life-sustaining career, it's  because of the restrictions, prerequisites, or what-ever that have been placed on the workforce, has caused it to become a fact for way too many people. Some of these people are not just pimply faced kids that can't tell time but rather people who have solid degrees and educations holding down 2-3 jobs not to mention those who worked and saved their whole life only to find themselves back at work in their 70's or 80's faced with decisions no one should be faced with at any age.

 

While it is not the entire fault or burden of industry, industry does and should share in the fault and burden. Profits at most places are at record levels and salary compensation packages for the upper mgmt are disproportionate. It's not about sharing anything since if you don't own it, it's not yours to share. This travels upwards as much as it travels back down. The argument isn't about how much education anymore since there are way too many people in low level positions that have more education than those at the top. I'm in agreement with and it's my personal experience and opinion that you can train a monkey to flip a burger, yet it can be done just as easily as training a jack-ass to be a CEO. Therefore, my question would be, why does a Jack-ass need $9,500,000.00 while only allowing the monkey that makes it all possible to earn $14,560.00. Seems to me that the whole would be better off without the head when it reality, it can't survive without what it considers it's most expendable parts. It's all backwards and the "Peter principle" has gone crazy.

 

I guess my whole point is that it's not just minimum wage that hasn't kept up with anything anywhere, especially the restaurant industry.


Edited by oldschool1982 - 5/30/14 at 8:36am
post #9 of 23


Our industry has been backward since its beginnings, and won't ever change.

       I remember I got 75 cents per hour when I started in the late 50s but I could not put into dollars what I learned, making everything from scratch. Was it worth it? You bet, would I do it again ?You bet. Can you do it today?  NO you have to pay $25 to 30,000.  a year to go to a school and learn less.

     In my apprenticeship in France, I averaged 52 cents an hour.    Gasoline was 27cents a gallon and I paid $500.00 for a 55 Desoto. Quart of milk was 25 and loaf of white bread(real bread) was 23 cents rent $70..00 a month 4 room railroad flat walk up. They called them tenements in those days.

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #10 of 23
A thought on a different way of thinking reguarding mim wage. Ive been on both sides of the pond so i see it from both views. Here,Sweden, we have no mim wage. Yet people working in fast food make a livable wage and take the jobs as a serious job. Good cust service, friendly, clean locations. Low turnover, long term employees. My dish washers make 20 bucks an hour, or more for the guys that have been with me for a while. They never, call off, come late, complain, and are happy working. This probly has something to do with the fact that i treat them like the valueable staff they are.

Point is, maybe if fast food paid a decent wage, treated workers as people, then they would have more efficent, happy to be there, long term employees rather than the mim wage/ mim effort lets see how fast we can get out of here mentality. Then again i could be wrong, but its been working for me for a long time.
post #11 of 23

OldSchool:  "Profits at most places are at record levels"

 

Minimum wage also hits the ones who aren't.

 

Plus, it's almost impossible to actually check references and get answers.

post #12 of 23


Logic of the whole fast food industry is "" There are lets say 5 million people in a given state you are only one , therefore they have another 4 million 999 thousand 999 to chose from""  You are expendable my friend to say the least.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #13 of 23

Who says this is for fast food employees exclusively? This will hit ALL min. wage employees in every sector once passed. It's coming soon to my state. There's also a likelihood that waitstaff min. will go from 2.63 to $6 per hr. plus tips. The average person doesn't realize that this will do two things, make many small restaurants go belly up, and two, those that survive will need massive price increases to cover the added overhead. Lunacy.

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post
 


Logic of the whole fast food industry is "" There are lets say 5 million people in a given state you are only one , therefore they have another 4 million 999 thousand 999 to chose from""  You are expendable my friend to say the least.


No one making minimum wage is going to drive across the state to get to work (or even be able to afford to). Also; the majority of labor is not making minimum.
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by CapeCodChef

 

The average person doesn't realize that this will do two things, make many small restaurants go belly up, and two, those that survive will need massive price increases to cover the added overhead. Lunacy.

 

Many small restaurants serve the purpose of laundering money or being a tax write off. If wages of working in food service increase; so does the desirability of working those jobs for people who wish to make an honest living doing it.

post #15 of 23


Does anyone really think that a mandated wage increase will improve the work ethic?    

post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raibeaux View Post
 


Does anyone really think that a mandated wage increase will improve the work ethic?    


"If you pay me more I'll work harder......"

post #17 of 23

It's really about money.  People complain about CEO pay but people hold CEOs accountable for their investments.  Walmart's CEO got $20 Million in compensation last year.  Walmart sold $477 BILLION in goods and services that same year.    (just round that up to $488 Billion)

 

That means, scaled properly, he would have had to sell 24,000 Quarter Pounder meals to get one free meal.

 

When a steak comes back to the kitchen it's $10, plus another $10 to fire it again.  You have to show yourself to be competent enough to not screw it up before you get a raise.

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweakz View Post
 


 Many small restaurants serve the purpose of laundering money or being a tax write off. If wages of working in food service increase; so does the desirability of working those jobs for people who wish to make an honest living doing it.

 

But those "more desirable jobs" don't exist in a vacuum. The far majority of small restaurants do NOT exist to launder money or provide tax write offs. They exist to make a living for the mom and pop owners and their employees. Forced higher costs by government will absolutely put some, if not many, out of business. I know of no small restaurant owner getting rich with his or her business. This trend is lunacy.

 

My own state just passed a law which will raise the min. wage by $1 per hour each year for the next 3 years to $11 per hour. This will raise my payroll by over $25k plus FICA, Workers Comp, and Unemployment for a total of over $30K. Where will that money come from? My pocket. And my pockets already have a hole in them, chewed out by the local, state and federal government. And I'm just a little guy with a few employees making minimum.

post #19 of 23
Seems that all the 15 dollars per hour BS has died down a bit.
That or all the other "problems" have pushed it down the media food chain.
@CapeCodChef I assume that you live and work in a state that is more liberal than mine.
Your lawmakers have probably had that bill in the wings waiting for a good opportunity to push it thru.
I feel for you and the other employers of min wage earners who will have to decide who to lay off... where to cut corners that have already been slashed.
Wonder how many small businesses have to go belly up before those at the top realize they have been duped.
Hang in there.

mimi
post #20 of 23

great im paying 37k for school and im going to run over to Burger king or wendys and be overrated for a job so i can't get in on the 15 an hour because i didn't drop out of school and went further for an education so why'll the Fry dropper or the meat flipper is getting 15 and hour 

I am makeing 10 and hour to spend 14 hrs a day on my feet in what i hope will be an AC kitchen lol 

post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

"Fast food places are not meant to be a lifelong job.

It is meant to be a job for young people to get their feet wet in the job market and for retirees to make a little extra cash in their golden years."

 

 

This is a purely idealistic concept, that fast food is for beginners and finishers. The fact of the matter is that the US has a gargantuan population of unskilled, uneducated, and uninspired youth AND adults.

 

Fast food is not only a first or last resort; it is the only resort for many, many people. This is why one finds the entire age spectrum working when they step into those fast food joints.

 

From the outside looking in, one can say that upping the minimum wage in the past hasn't caused any economic catastrophes.

 

From the inside looking out, one can say that fulfilling the payroll and other sundry requirements of owning a business may well damn near destroy the business.

 

From the conspiracy theorist camp, one can say that upping the minimum wage so drastically is a plan to deliver a death blow to the solar plexus of American economy--the small business.

 

From the optimistic point of view, one can say that, as has been shown in history, proper mitigation of the problems that suddenly arise with such radical speed will result in a satisfactory status quo, after the initial shock of change has subsided.

 

The wrong approach to have while dealing with the situation, in my opinion, is small-minded quibbling about where the fault lies. This is what is going to happen, apparently. As business people, we need to be able to focus on mitigating the problems or dealing with the results of just letting them occur.

 

Tighten your aprons, adjust your toques, sharpen your knives, and set your mise en place, people: There's three tables, two hours, and 50 tickets coming in...

post #22 of 23
The promise of a better standard of living from a higher minimum wage is a farce. Go to Washington. People working at their higher minimum wage live no better, probably worse, than those making the lower minimum wage in Kansas.

Raise the minimum wage and it will just inflate the cost of everything else. It's a circle jerk. You make more money, but it costs more money for you to live because everyone else is making more money too and you have to pay for it, leaving you with more dollars left over at the end of your paycheck, but less buying power with those dollars.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
post #23 of 23

I have lived both sides of the issue. In the past, I worked my way up to the position of Restaurant Manager with a national QSR chain, and then to a multi-unit GM/Assistant Area Supervisor with another.  Then I made the move to work for a regional full service chain and have never looked back. Ironically, I now make more with less stress, although I seem to have a weird hybrid job...

 

In the past, I worked my way up to the higher positions.  I started as the low man, working for minimum wage, which sucks.  The thing is, most of these jobs are not worth more than minimum wage and, unfortunately, most of the employees are not worth it either.  In some areas, yes, I can perhaps see starting wages of $9.00 or so, but that is it. 

 

Further compounding the problem is that the general public does not understand that, in most cases, the NIBT is less than2%. They have no clue how a profit and loss report works, and are under the delusion that everyone who owns a quick service franchise is making a million a year. 

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