ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › "Gravy" or "sauce"?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

"Gravy" or "sauce"? - Page 4

post #91 of 105

I'm an Italian-American from North NJ and we called tomato sauce with meat in it gravy. Pretty much every other Italian-American I know did and does as well. I personally always understood it was just something we called it and that it isn't the proper name, but pretty much every Italian in New Jersey and New York calls it gravy.

post #92 of 105
Quote:
... but pretty much every Italian in New Jersey and New York calls it gravy.

e.g.: "Paulie Walnuts"

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #93 of 105

What is soft salami ?

post #94 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post
 

     And here in Sunny Florida  Lasagna is pronounced  Lazzagana, Bracciole is Brasseeolee.  Sopressatta  and Panchetta could be a disease , the natives  would not  know. Oh well this is only place I have ever seen Bologna and Soft Salami come in frozen

What is Soft Salami ?

post #95 of 105

I am Italian on both sides of my family and never heard it called "gravy" either until I met some Italians who did. If tomato sauce is "gravy," what is that stuff made of roast meat drippings and flour? "Sauce"? This eternal debate has nearly come to blows. Guess it just depends on how you were raised.

post #96 of 105

What is soft salami? San Francisco type salami and most others are harder than average. Genoa salami is the only one I know of that is much softer. You can tell by squeezing the soft ones. I think it is because soft has a higher fat content. MHO.

post #97 of 105

Soft salami is bigger, cheaper and cooked. Like a huge frankfurter.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #98 of 105

I have my maternal grandparents' documents for emigration to America, dated 1913. They include the steamship ticket and voyage information. The menu for Thursday states "Dry pasta asciutta al sugo. Carne a ragu con patate." The on-line traslator translates this as, "Macaroni in sauce. Meat sauce with potatoes." In any translation there will be something lost since not all concepts are represented in both languages.

post #99 of 105

Interesting. I just assumed the hard was cured longer.

post #100 of 105

Your mother's statement about "if it has meat in it its gravy, otherwise its sauce" is exactly how it was explained to me by a chef trained in Italy and an Italian chef.  I got into an argument the other night by saying what your mother said --they were saying that all italian tomato sauce was called gravy -- which is incorrect!

post #101 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by W.DeBord View Post

Mezzaluna, I saw that episode too, awhile ago. MAN OH MAN you HAVE to make her gravy. I printed it off the foodtv site and have been making hers' ever since. IT'S A WONDERUL RECIPE, no wonder why she won! I think she mentioned publishing a cookbook on her own, I'd buy it.

Her meatballs are perfect. And the technique makes wonderful sense, cooks them just right.....

She calls it gravy and I'm not about to argue with her knowledge on the topic.

 

Do you have the link of that recipe? :)

 

Thanks.

post #102 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdpb View Post
 

Your mother's statement about "if it has meat in it its gravy, otherwise its sauce" is exactly how it was explained to me by a chef trained in Italy and an Italian chef.  I got into an argument the other night by saying what your mother said --they were saying that all italian tomato sauce was called gravy -- which is incorrect!

 

I will believe you if they said it in Italian.  I call bogus.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #103 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

 

I will believe you if they said it in Italian.  I call bogus.

This reminds me of a conversation I was having recently with some friends.  She is Italian (born and raised in Rome, emigrated to USA as adult) and he Italian-American from New York or New Jersey (what's the difference, after all?). He doesn't care to eat  her "Italian" cooking, nor does she care to eat his. Both claim  to be heirs to "real Italian cooking knowledge" until she finally admitted that in Italy there is no such thing as "Italian cuisine"... in the sense of a single, unified, standard understanding of food.

post #104 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

Imari,
How can an Italian know what a word is in English?  When an italian-american from the northeast says spaghetti with gravy, he means tomato sauce which may or may not have meat in it.  (Most american pasta sauces had meat so i think maybe that's why the term stuck for meat sauce.)

Of COURSE no one in italy calls a tomato sauce anything that sounds like "gravy" - because "gravy" is English and italians speak Italian! 
There is also nothing that sounds like the word "eggplant" in italian - they say melanzana.  So?  if i want to make eggplant parmesan, is that not an italian dish and is it not melanzane alla parmigiana? 

 I don't get it

yes but eggplant is a word that can be translated into italian,gravy is not.
post #105 of 105

gravy translates to Italian. It's sugo.

To me it's obvious that sugo got bastardized into sauce or gravy. It also has to do with pronunciation. When the Italians translated to english and tried to talk

at the speed they spoke Italian, who knows what comes out. I almost never understood my relatives when they tried to speak english fast.

Melanzana spoken by Italians was usually not pronounced correctly. They would speed it up so that most of the time it sounded like moulinyan. To this day I have

Cugini that I can't understand when they speak english fast. When they do this to Americans, the Americans just stare at my cousins like they just grew another face. They get

so bent.

BTW, it's Gravy!  unless it's a quick preparation, oil, onions, garlic, pan,  pasta..   Very lite,  it's Sauce. ' Salsa' like aglio e olio

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › "Gravy" or "sauce"?