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Slaw chopping

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I've been trying to figure out how best to chop slaw so it has a uniform, fine look and feel like what's pictured. Ideas? Maybe mandolin slice then through one of those press choppers like for tomatoes or potatoes? THANKS!

post #2 of 12

For what kind of quantities?

 

I don't like that style of slaw but muy family does.  I use a sharp chef knife and just spend the time slicing and slicing.

 

There must be a machine used by commercial folks but I don't know.  There are enough people making this style slaw in large quantities so they can't possibley be chopping by hand.  Buffalo chopper, perhaps?

post #3 of 12


This looks like it was chopped in a Buffalo type machine

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 12

If you break it down first into slices, you can use a food processor to pulse it into a fairly even texture. What you pictured is essentially "minced" .. so a very fine chop. You can do that with a knife but honestly if you are doing more than a few servings I can only imagine using a food pro.

post #5 of 12

A food processor?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 12

Sorry trakk, but is that really a slaw you're trying to make? Looks more like a tzaziki.

 

For making a slaw, I want to see leaves and I prefer to cut strips nearly always this way; half or quarter lengthwise. If you cut quarters, you will be able to remove tough or bitter cores easily. Then cut at an angle into long strips. Cut as thin as you like. Be sure to make cutting movements (slide your knife though) and not to chop, this will prevent the salads to bruise and turn brown or to turn into an ugly mush. Machinery is out of the question for the same reason. dressing goes on at the very last minute, also for the same reason.

Here's an example how I cut for a slaw, using Belgian endives;

 

Belgian endive slaw 1

post #7 of 12

Grinder with your largest die maybe?  We use to make slaw in the Hobart with the buffalo blades and it was pretty uniform. 

post #8 of 12
how about an old fasshioned box grater, works for me just fine.
post #9 of 12


This is Belgian Endive not green cabbage . I think he was chopping cabbage. If  endive were put in machine 95% chance it would turn dark.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #10 of 12
Use the cheese grater attachment on your food processor.
post #11 of 12
Second that. Buffalo chopper for big quantities, shredder attachment on food processor for smaller ones.

Personally, I don't like that texture of slaw. I like mine sliced.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
post #12 of 12

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Edited by tweakz - 10/27/14 at 10:34am
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