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Chopping Large Amounts of Parsley (Pacojet?) - Page 2

post #31 of 36

Train young energetic prep folks to play "wipe-out" or other drum solos using the sharp twin french knives suggested earlier. Other option, twin Sharp chinese cleavers. (not giant heavy ones).

Note: Large prep table; large, thick wooden or other) cutting board; damp kitchen towel underneath for non-slip: & obviously fresh parsley that is NOT WET. 

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post #32 of 36
Daverdown,

The pacojet will NOT work at all for the application you require for parsley. The pacojet completely homoginizes the food into a 100% smooth puree or mousse. Your chopped texture required for tabouli will not benefit from a parsley puree, the sales rep was ill informing you. It's a fantastic device but its a one trick pony essentially.

As for you situation call me old fashioned but I am another vote for hand chopping the parsley. 40 bunches really isnt that much honestly, I recall being able to finely mince 6 or so bunhes of parsley at my very first kitchen job in about 3 minutes. Focusing on making the prep cook more efficient at doing so is where I would expend my energy into. Bunching the picked leaves tightly is essential and your very first set of cuts should be as fine as possible, this is most important. I taught myself using Jacque Pepin's old black and white book on cooking techniques and fundamentals and the way he shows how to mince parsley is timeless, it's perhaps the most efficient method described in any text.
post #33 of 36
Hello,

New here, I just joined! Merry christmas to all people on the forum.

I agree that a good knife is the best for chopping parsley. And it is not that time consuming, all in all!

I just want to mention a trick given to me by a pro. After chopping parsley, you may notice that when you want to sprinkle it on a dish, it annoyingly sticks to your fingers.

Well, all you have to do is squeeze its juice real hard with a clean towel (of course, you will keep that precious green juice as a colouring for a sauce or a dressing).

Have a great Christmas!
post #34 of 36
I have to confirm, a pack jet is not your friend here😢 a couple of knives is what you need.
post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by michoutim View Post

Hello,

New here, I just joined! Merry christmas to all people on the forum.

I agree that a good knife is the best for chopping parsley. And it is not that time consuming, all in all!

I just want to mention a trick given to me by a pro. After chopping parsley, you may notice that when you want to sprinkle it on a dish, it annoyingly sticks to your fingers.

Well, all you have to do is squeeze its juice real hard with a clean towel (of course, you will keep that precious green juice as a colouring for a sauce or a dressing).

Have a great Christmas!
post #36 of 36
You can fit three knives in one hand if you place them between your knuckles. A good rocking motion and you will find that you can cut through a bunch quickly.
Failing that, there is also a herb chopping knife that has two or three blades on a curve. Costs 10$ or so and allows you to work through that bunch quickly.

Paco jet or a buffalo chopper? It depends what they are being used for. If it's garnish, no way. If you are not worried about bruising the herbs, then that's all good. If you want a subtle flavor, it will not work out for you.

Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

Reply
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