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Beef burgers? - Page 2

post #31 of 43

Ah, now I see.:o  No offense, I just hate working with the stuff.  We sell quite a few buffalo burgers where I work (according to the P-mix something like a thousand in 2013) and I just don't like them at all.  People seem to eat 'em up but the texture is off and they fall apart much more easily than beef burgers.  Could be the supplier we use, and I'm not the guy pattying them up so I don't know how they're being handled.  I don't care for the taste and they smell repulsive to me.

 

As far as beef goes I think 80/20 is fine but if the OP is finding that to be too dry, and if the meat isn't overcooked, then perhaps that ratio is to lean for that person.  Or maybe it's been frozen, I dunno.  Personally I think 70/30 is getting fatty to the point that you lose too much to shrinkage during cooking but depends on the situation I suppose.

 

As for the pan or plancha I think SpoiledBroth is spot on.  I like to broil burgers but some of the best ones I've ever had were seared in a pan.  When I make a burger at home I generally form the patty, vac seal it with a soft vac and sous vide it at 130 F for 2.5 hours, then finish it with 30 seconds per side in a screaming hot cast iron pan with a TBSP or so of coconut oil.  It gets an amazing crust while leaving it on the MR side.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #32 of 43
Thread Starter 

I don't grind it myself no I don't have the means to.  One possibly very important thing I forgot to mention was that it was actually 3 days before I actually made the burgers and the meat although OK had started to change colour. Possibly that didn't help.

post #33 of 43
Well, then, do you know what the fat content is? Usually where i get it, it's labelled. If you're unsure, do go ask at the place you purchased it. Next question is if it's all one cut or a variety of scraps. If the meat hasn't been cooking up right for you, try getting a piece of , say, chuck and having them grind that, hopefully supplementing with a little fat.
post #34 of 43
Three day old meat is a factor.
post #35 of 43
Thread Starter 

The butcher told me it was 18 to 20% fat.

post #36 of 43
Then your next step is to try 20% or higher w/ only one cut of beef.. or two or three that you select, and not trim from whatever
post #37 of 43
Fresh ground choice 80/20 chuck. Not over cooked, nice and juicy.
post #38 of 43
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I use 80\20 ground chuck and I only flip it once. We serve two 4oz sliders and house cut curly fries with jalapeño bacon gravy on the fries. I also serve flaming wings "literally". Wrongs are tossed in house made sauce then have 151 drizzled on top. Then they are lit on fire right in front of the guest.
Chef Justin Johnson
Executive Chef Red Goose Saloon
post #39 of 43
Some damn good looking food there tattooedchef! I would annhialate that poutine
post #40 of 43
How about adding some teaspoon of cinnamon teaspoon of siracha sauce salt garlic onions breadcrumbs egg handful of grated cheddar some cracked black pepper delicous...
Den I would serve them in a floury bap with whiskey Mayo bacon jam slice emental cheese and a bit of rocket!!!
post #41 of 43
@gourmettart sounds like your trying to confuse the guests palate. Keep it simple and make your ingredients do the talking. Simplicity is the key to great food, not 29 different ingredients. Not trying to sound like an asshole. But after 17 years. Simplicity is always your best recipe for success.
post #42 of 43
29 different ingredients? I count 8... I think that sounds like a wicked burger. There are a lot of restaurants where it would be inappropriate to serve unseasoned chuck (not talking salt and pepper), I would opine that any burger (un)seasoned like that could easily be recreated at home for less money by the guest. If your price point is 20 dollars for entrees and you've got a burger on the menu you'd better be damn sure you do something extra so as not to gouge the guest.
post #43 of 43

Apropos of nothing I sometimes wonder if anyone in my town even has a kitchen in their home!  You can drive by any decent restaurant in town even on, say, a Monday night at 6:00pm, and it's pretty busy.  When I eat out it's either because I'm out shopping or running errands and am in a hurry or when I want something that's a PITA to cook at home.  In the latter case I'm thinking of something like Chinese where I'd have to buy a lot of ingredients I don't normally keep on hand or if I want a Napoli pizza where you really need an oven hotter than I can get mine at home.  But most people seem to just eat a high percentage of their meals in restaurants.

 

It seems strange to me have dozens of ingredients in a burger.  Generally I only season mine with S&P.  I can see adding some onion or garlic under some circumstances.  To each their own but I don't season the meat much preferring to add condiments if necessary.  I like the taste of the beef to shine through.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
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