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Keeping emulsified dressing stable

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hi chefs

Home cook here. We had steaks last night with a mustard dressing. Oil, vinegar, mustard, mustard seeds, capers, garlic. It was amazing.

Just before serving I noticed the dressing had split. I made it before cooking steak as steaks cook in 3 minutes (thin sirloin). Adding a bit of vinegar and mustard and whisking vigorously brought it back.

How do you guys keep emulsified dressing stable?
post #2 of 13

Xanthan gum will do the trick.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 13
In a french kitchen I used to be in, we used an egg white. It works wonderfully, but people dont always like that idea of a raw white. Alternatively you can increase the amount of mustard, and that should hold it together longer.

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post #4 of 13

@leejayd I hardly make a classic vinaigrette anymore, which is what you made but with added garlic and capers. And, well, it's very unusual to hear someone use it on steak instead of on a salad.

 

However, here's a delicious alternative with thousands of possible variations, that can be used on nearly everything.

It's known as a "vinaigrette salée" in classic French cuisine. It is so simple to make! You need a good mayonnaise as a base, preferably homemade!

 

Vinaigrette salée

Basic sauce; I usually take 3 large heaped tbsp. of mayo. Add 1 tbsp. of white vinegar (I mostly use homemade tarragon vinegar). Add 2 tbsp. of cold water. Extra s&p to taste. You need a whisk to beat all of this into a perfect smooth stable sauce.

 

It all depends how thin you want your sauce. This one is quite thin but you can use less water if you want the sauce somewhat thicker. As you can guess, all kinds of additions are possible, such as adding extra mustard, capers and garlic as you did etc. Spices or fresh herbs etc. etc. Your only limit is your imagination.

Oh, and by the way; everyone loves this sauce.... while many people hate vinaigrettes. How about adding fresh chopped tarragon, parsley,  garlic and a pinch of cayenne to your next steak dressing made with this sauce base?

 

Here's an example of vinaigrette salée that went well with chicken with a chunk of pine apple, salmon, shrimp, veal, couscous salad... all on just one plate.

 

BBQ 2

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all your comments. I have to try the vinaigrette salee. It sounds very nice.

When I made the dressing for the steaks it was thicker than what I would make for a salad dressing - more sauce like.

ChrisBelgium : you have me salivating at that picture.
post #6 of 13

Thanks LJ. I didn't found it for my previous post but was looking for the following picture too, where the same vinaigrette salée is used, only a bit thicker and with herbs in it. It's a salad with panfried halloumi cheese on top.

 

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

Xanthan gum will do the trick.

+1.  However, xanthan gum also has the effect of thickening.  If you want it thinner, use Soy Lecithin as an emulsifier.

post #8 of 13
Where do i find either xanthun gum, soy lecithin or guar gum? The health food store's bulk section?.....i have looked all over bob's red mill section in the grocery stores and come up empty handed. Is the powder added directly to the dressing or is it diluted first? I make all the restaurants dressings by the gallon, three of which are vinaigrettes. New dressing is a lemon vinaigrette which separates fairly quickly. we keep it an a squeeze bottle and just re shake it each time we need it....it would be nice to stabilize it a bit. thanks

joey
Edited by durangojo - 6/23/14 at 11:29am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #9 of 13

I find that my basic vinaigrettes stay emulsified longer if an ev olive oil is used.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #10 of 13
I bought mine off amazon. Whole foods should have xanthan gum, those gluten free weirdos use it for baking.
post #11 of 13

Nature's Oasis Market should have it and yeah you just sprinkle it in while making it. Works best if using a blender as opposed to by hand. Also if the dressing has any sugar in it, mix it with the sugar first as this helps the dispersion. Go easy, a little goes a long way and it happens fairly quickly.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #12 of 13
Thanks all for the info, and thanks cheflayne for the advice.....will look in nature's o next time i'm in town...is there any appreciable difference between xanthun gum and guar gum in case only one or the other is available here?
koko, yeah i do use evoo for my dressings even at $31 bucks a gallon....ouch!!!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #13 of 13

Guar gum can lose it's thickening power in highly acidic conditions such as a lemon vinaigrette.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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