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coarse stone tips?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Need a stone for thinning on looking at the king 220 is it to large step to go on 220 then to king 1000?

And how is the king 220? Love the king 1000 so :-)
post #2 of 6

I have a King 220/800 combo. The 220 was mainly used to thin a white steel knife dramatically. It's not the stone but the toughness of the steel that hollowed the stone out after a long day of work. Obviously, the 800 is a good next step. A 1k should be ok too.

 

    The left picture shows the state of the knife when I bought it. On the right after the thinning.

 

  Started with thinning that part of the knife but I needed to thin it much higher.

 It doesn't show, but this is many hours of work with a 220 grit stone on white steel which is tough like hell to work with!

 

  Hard to see on this picture but the stone was hollowed in the middle after a few hours. I restored (flattened) the stone and it's still in use.

post #3 of 6
I prefer coarse wet/dry automotive sandpaper, on linen, for gross steel removal, starting at P120, After that, setting a bevel will take just a few strokes with a 400 or 800.
post #4 of 6

For $70 you could buy a belt sander from Harbor Freight  during one of their frequent sales, and that way hours become minutes.  I spent hours, fairly enjoyable ones, thinning out some knives I have using what I already had lying around.  They could still use a bit more to get them to optimum sleek, but I look at it like this: I paid nothing for these knives, so the $70 belt sander would escalate the cost by obscenely high orders of magnitude.

 

Rick

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

For $70 you could buy a belt sander from Harbor Freight  during one of their frequent sales, and that way hours become minutes.  I spent hours, fairly enjoyable ones, thinning out some knives I have using what I already had lying around.  They could still use a bit more to get them to optimum sleek, but I look at it like this: I paid nothing for these knives, so the $70 belt sander would escalate the cost by obscenely high orders of magnitude.

 

Rick


That would be also my choice if I ever had another tough knife to thin.

post #6 of 6
Coarse automotive wet/dry sandpaper with linen backing. I usually start with P120 "Metall" by Robert Bosch. Use it dry, edge trailing only, restrain pressure, stay away from the very edge.
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