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Cooking with Wine

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

If I choose to make a Steak Diane plate I should be OK using a Port Wine instead of a Brandy or Cognac right? Any thoughts are appreciated. Since the Port Wine has a short shelf life I'm trying to use it up

post #2 of 13
Not the same; brandy and cognac are distilled liquors with a very different flavor profile than port.
Not steak Diane; the name means a certain recipe, and while variation is fine, thats.pretty far out.
Good or bad? Heck, try it out, seems a little sweet for me but don't let that stop you. Probably be pretty good.
post #3 of 13

...but, what kind of Port Wine are we talking here @Yeller

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

It's a Tawney Port that was given to us..by accident I'm sure..maybe I should blend in some Scotch or just go with Merlot. ..It wicked sweet so I'll cut back on it big.. So will the port ignite?

post #5 of 13

I would imagine any sort of booze would, well, maybe not beer, TRY IT!  see what happens, ya' know, that's part of the fun in cooking, try something once, if it does work or you and your family don't care for it, take that recipe card and chuck it.  well, I suppose you'd call out for pizza at that point  :lol:

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thinkin I'll just blend a little Port with some Merlot and let it go ..I doubt it will ignite but the Port is way sweet and that's what she hates..I'll keep ya posted. I wanted to do Spaghetti Carbonara with Pan Seared Scallops.. Oh well I lose.

post #7 of 13

... book report with pictures please? Thank you

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

I only put in 3T of Port to 1/3C of Merlot and added tad of Balsamic Vinegar in the saute shrooms garlic and onions. Was pretty happy had just a hint of the sweetness from the Port. This was just a grilled sirloin, didn't brown in pan etc...

 

 

 

post #9 of 13

Right On Braddah!

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeller View Post
 

If I choose to make a Steak Diane plate I should be OK using a Port Wine instead of a Brandy or Cognac right? Any thoughts are appreciated. Since the Port Wine has a short shelf life I'm trying to use it up


As a European and a fervent French cuisine adept, I never heard of a sauce Diane, so I had to Google it and discovered it is an American dish. Well, one is never old enough to learn, thanks for getting my attention to it, Yeller.

 

Oh, I have to add that Port wine has a very long shelf life contrary to what you think. It's what they call a "fortified" wine, which is nothing else than a wine to which extra alcohol is added. It keeps until the bottle is emptied...

post #11 of 13


Usually Steak Dianne and it is American based. Usually done Flambe style and finished at table  Real old fashioned like Steak Au Poive

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #12 of 13

Lets add that a Tawny Port is something to be deligthed. Usually a dessert wine, Port and cheese is a delicious classic. In my opinion, mixing a Tawny with Scoth or Merlot, is a blasphemy, but i've made some nice sauces using Port. My idol Michel Roux Jr. uses Port in many of his classic sauces.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeller View Post
 

I only put in 3T of Port to 1/3C of Merlot and added tad of Balsamic Vinegar in the saute shrooms garlic and onions. Was pretty happy had just a hint of the sweetness from the Port. This was just a grilled sirloin, didn't brown in pan etc...

 

 

 

 

Wine becomes more acidic once you boil off the alchohol and reduce it a bit.  I will always add sugar to a beef burgundy and most all else involving non-desert wines.  I find sweet vermouth has just enough sugar in it to use in many recipes without over sweetening.

 

On another note simply addressing the post title, try using a sauvignon blanc in your favorite pepper steak recipe, lends a very exotic flavor.  And don't forget the sugar!

 

 

Rick

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