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Corn! - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post
 

Try the Mexican version, Elote. Grill up your corn, and slather with a mixture of mayo, chili powder, cumin, garlic, lime juice, cilantro and cotija cheese (or canned parmesan). Sounds weird, mayo on hot corn but it melts in like butter. One of my favorite things when fresh corn is available.

 

Yes a big green shaker can of parm will be found with all the other do it yourself spices and seasonings on the counter of every corn-in-a-cup (as well as the DIY pull the shuck back form ) vendor in my area.

Not just the trucks and trailers in the barrio (and Fiesta Store parking lots) but the anglo festivals as well.

It gives the treat a salty milky profile ... not unpleasant at all.

 

mimi

post #32 of 48

I saw a PBS documentary from the 70s on Thai street food and their version of grilled corn is so good that I almost only eat corn on the cob  this way anymore.  Reduce a can of coconut milk with 1/2 cup brown sugar and tablespoon ground red pepper.  Add cornstarch slurry to thicken and grill husked and cleaned corn on med-high direct heat continuously basting until corn is cooked and thoroughly caramelized. 

 

*

post #33 of 48
Thread Starter 
@kaneohegirlinaz I boiled it then rolled it in an herbed butter and roasted it in the oven.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #34 of 48

and what did you think of your first attempt Miss KK?

post #35 of 48
Thread Starter 
It was great. More butter more better.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #36 of 48

I usually boil, steam or nuke corn on the cob - and sometimes eat it plain. It''s so juicy and sweet on its own. Grilled is good too. I love the taste of fresh sweet corn and fresh vegetables. I'm going to try it raw (cut off the cob) in a salad with halved cherry or grape tomatoes, diced avocado, red onion, fresh herbs & fresh lime juice.

post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefHoff View Post
 

I saw a PBS documentary from the 70s on Thai street food and their version of grilled corn is so good that I almost only eat corn on the cob  this way anymore.  Reduce a can of coconut milk with 1/2 cup brown sugar and tablespoon ground red pepper.  Add cornstarch slurry to thicken and grill husked and cleaned corn on med-high direct heat continuously basting until corn is cooked and thoroughly caramelized.

 

*

That-corn-looks-and-sounds-AMAZING!

 

mimi

post #38 of 48

It is FlipFlopGirl.   Thanks.  The last time I made it, I had to break up a fight between my wife and mother-in-law over the last ear.  For the record, my wife got to have it.  I do have to live with her :lol:

post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefHoff View Post
 

I saw a PBS documentary from the 70s on Thai street food and their version of grilled corn is so good that I almost only eat corn on the cob  this way anymore.  Reduce a can of coconut milk with 1/2 cup brown sugar and tablespoon ground red pepper.  Add cornstarch slurry to thicken and grill husked and cleaned corn on med-high direct heat continuously basting until corn is cooked and thoroughly caramelized. 

 

 

 

@ChefHoff your corn looks amazing that is a great photo and thanks for sharing the recipe. When I was a kid we would visit Greece (where my father is from) and there were street vendors with little charcoal grills selling corn. It was such a treat as a kid to buy some corn and enjoy it walking around Greece. Unfortunately many people got sick from the vendors and they outlawed the stands and you can't find them anymore. 

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #40 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

@ChefHoff
 your corn looks amazing that is a great photo and thanks for sharing the recipe. When I was a kid we would visit Greece (where my father is from) and there were street vendors with little charcoal grills selling corn. It was such a treat as a kid to buy some corn and enjoy it walking around Greece. Unfortunately many people got sick from the vendors and they outlawed the stands and you can't find them anymore. 

Maybe that's more fortunate than not.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #41 of 48

+1 @chefbuba ya beat me to it.  I love the mexican corn.  Cotija cheese is fabulous.  Also I'm lactose intolerant so I only eat hard cheeses anyway.  TMI overshare sorry

post #42 of 48

I have another suggestion too.  Chop up scallions and fry it up with some fish sauce.  Add this to your corn.  It is awesomeee

post #43 of 48

Ah here.  I was talking about something like this.  The picture on the cob is how my mom would make it.

 

http://momofukufor2.com/2010/07/grilled-corn-with-green-onion-oil-recipe/

post #44 of 48
I don't serve frozen corn. Compared to fresh, it's bland and tastes like a freezer. We get corn in our grocery stores from somewhere for 8 or 9 months of the year. The rest of the time I eat something else.

Most the time, I cut it off the cob to serve it. With a little salt in the boiling water, it's great just boiled, but there is so much that can be done with it.

I like to melt a little butter and squeeze in some lime or lemon juice and toss with the corn and fresh herbs. Lemon juice and dill or parsley are norms, as is lime juice and cilantro.

Any salad using corn is way better with fresh corn.

Black beans, corn, roasted red pepper, jalapeno, red onion, garlic, lime juice, cilantro.

Corn, diced tomatoes, cucumber, basil, balsamic vinegar, olive oil

If you have a Vitamix, try doing a corn chowder with fresh corn. It's amazing. Better yet, toss in some crab or lobster meat.

Fresh corn is great in creamy polenta too, with some cumin, butter, lemon juice and cilantro.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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post #45 of 48

Instead of boiling it slice it off the cob and saute it in butter until done. Add whatever spices/herbs you want as it cooks.

post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon ODell View Post

I don't serve frozen corn.

 

Oddly enough, corn is about the only frozen vegetable I use. Not for guests, but just for the two of us. A favorite side dish is what I call mock chew, because it isn't really maque choux.

 

Basically saute frozen corn, sweet peppers and green onions in butter. Of course when real fresh corn is readily available like now, I don't use frozen.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

... just for the two of us. A favorite side dish is what I call mock chew, because it isn't really maque choux.

 

Basically saute frozen corn, sweet peppers and green onions in butter. Of course when real fresh corn is readily available like now, I don't use frozen.

 

uh! that sounds like a nice winter veg, when there's not much in the way of fresh to be had!

maybe with the frozen okra and some kielbasa added or even chicken, yummm! :lips:

post #48 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

Oddly enough, corn is about the only frozen vegetable I use. Not for guests, but just for the two of us. A favorite side dish is what I call mock chew, because it isn't really maque choux.

Basically saute frozen corn, sweet peppers and green onions in butter. Of course when real fresh corn is readily available like now, I don't use frozen.

I think frozen corn is great. I haven't taken on the frah stuff till now and it is good, but I still think frozen corn is good. I make the same exact thing, I'm going to start calling it mock chew too!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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