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Meat Saw

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I also put this on the equipment forum, I hope that's ok.

 

Hey, folks.

I've been thinking about buying a meat saw.  I've never used one, and know nothing about them.

My use for it would be for cutting bone-in pork chops, and maybe something like a bone-in export rib.

 

I can't spend a ton of money on one, but I want one that is powerful enough to do the job without

overloading the machine.  As this would be for a restaurant, there's no need for the industrial strength

types used in meat markets, but I want it powerful enough I don't have to baby it.

 

I was thinking of maybe a counter model, but don't know.  I also am wondering about how much trouble

they are to clean, as I wouldn't be actually using it every day.

 

Also, how do they compare to a regular meat slicer for these jobs?  I'm cutting boneless ribeyes and sirloin

on a Globe 12".

 

Thanks for any help/advice you can give.

 

Ray

post #2 of 6
You must be cutting a lot of meat! I've nevrr seen steaks cut on a slicer, and never seen a meat saw in a restaurant. Seems like maybe you should pop around to local butcher shops/meat counters and see what they use.
post #3 of 6


I have worked with them a lot. They are great and are big and powerful and dangerous.

 

I never saw a table model and yes they are hard to clean. They must and  should be broken down and hosed down sprayed with Clorox and dried good. 

And yes a decent meat slicer can be used to cut boneless strips and rib yes.. Most precut steaks today commercially are cut with a laser.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hi.  I've been cutting steaks on slicers for all these 23 years.  I've heard the same thing 1000 times.  Problem is, nobody told me this before I started doing it.  Ate a lot of steak while learning, but it works great for me.  This is also how grilled beef tips made it to the menu.  I can get my ribeyes and sirloins within about a half-ounce, so I'm fine with it.

 

By the way, I also use a 12" cimiter on them for the silver skin and fat.  Just got used to it, I guess.  Works for me.  I have one 12"  that after years of sharpening looks like a 12" boning knife.  When I recently ordered a new one, I sent if back saying it was incorrect.  Then I got to looking at the second one that arrived and realized it was what the old one had looked like in its younger days.

 

Anyhow, back to the meat saw, I sell a lot of 6-oz. bone-in pork chops.  Buying them already cut is bad expensive.  Thinking about buying the whole bone-in center cut loin.  Plus I want to do bone-in steaks, but ain't gonna pay the price difference to buy them already cut.

 

Another thing, I have bad shoulders so no hand saw.

post #5 of 6

You're going to want something like a band saw. I think there are stand alone models available (http://www.ebay.com/sch/Saws-/95076/i.html) that would fit your needs. 

 

I have used band saws in the past (I worked in a kitchen that had a built in, industrial-style bone saw) and it was amazing. Although every time I used it, I always had a grizzly picture of myself falling forward into the blade. Ew. 

 

But I would think something like that is what you need. I don't know what your budget is, but the link above seems reasonable. They are a pain to clean though. 

post #6 of 6

Look around for a used Biro they are not too big about the same size as a 14" wood band saw.  They have a sliding table and a nice fence.  I had one in my cabinet shop for years. 

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