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Help Identify this vintage kitchen tool

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I've seen this as a kid at my grandmothers house, but for the life of me I can't recall what it does or what its called. I've spent a lot of time browsing google for an answer but can't find it. Does anyone out there know what it is?

 

 

post #2 of 15

Some kind of a butter pat press?

 

Does the insides of both plates have some kind of decoration or carving?  If so perhaps some kind of a cookie press?

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #3 of 15

Nutcracker?

post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

Someone showed me this picture asking if I knew what it was. I have no other information other than this picture. Looks like there is a roller in the middle of it. I was thinking maybe a nutcracker too but then why would it need to roll? Closest things on google I found like it were garlic presses and nutcrackers. So I dunno.

post #5 of 15
Looks like butter paddles to me, for forming blocks of butter.
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

Looks like butter paddles to me, for forming blocks of butter.


And Ishbel takes home the prize. You are correct. They are butter paddles.

post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post
 


And Ishbel takes home the prize. You are correct. They are butter paddles.

That can be 100% correct. 

 

I cannot say it is not because I have no idea.

 

I Googled Image "Vintage wooden butter paddles", "Butter paddles", "butter press", "butter molds", "vintage butter paddles" ------ thousands of pictures, not one looks remotely the same as the picture.

 

The design is curious, why the sloped bottom plate at one end? why the top is hinged with a roller, the mechanical geometry makes it impossible to roll the top paddle. The countersunk holes implies the tool was permanently mounted, making it impossible to be cleaned, also the location of the mounting holes indicates the tool was to be used with the handle lifted  up to apply force down at the square end.

 

dcarch

post #8 of 15

Now you made me go back and take a better look.

 

Those aren't 2 separate paddles.....more like a base piece with a carved out groove that the other part fits in.

Plus it looks as if it has a metal pin that's bent to keep the 2 together for whatever purpose.

 

I spoke too soon.

post #9 of 15

Can you "open" up or disassemble the item without damaging it to display the interior?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

Can you "open" up or disassemble the item without damaging it to display the interior?

Sorry I can not. I don't have the item only a picture. Nice to see another Georgian though.

post #11 of 15
post #12 of 15

I don't see any roller, there is a wire that I can only assume loops around the bottom of the base and attaché to the other side of the paddle as it does on the visible side.  So the paddle can literally rock 'n roll, move back and forth while see-sawing end to end.

 

I cannot offhand imagine what useful purpose this would serve that couldn't be accomplished in a better way.  I have to wonder if this might just be a joke some forward-thinking chef/handyman wanted to play on some unseen future generation of kitchen geek.

 

 

Rick

post #13 of 15

Last night I google imaged classic kitchen tools.

 

I scrolled through until I reached the end.

 

Nothing.

 

My curiosity is peaked.

post #14 of 15

I have one rule for baffling or seemingly useless thingamabobs....

Will it open a beer bottle?

 

mimi

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

I have one rule for baffling or seemingly useless thingamabobs....

Will it open a beer bottle?

 

mimi


 Yes, I believe it will, and since I rarely drink bear I could see myself making it my nicknacconversationpiecego-to opener.

 

 

Rick

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