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good honing steel?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
http://m.ebay.com/itm/360623255620?txnId=546659249023

Is that a good steel? Got a Vixtorinox petty/pairing knife and some old soft steel chefs knifes :-)
post #2 of 15

There is also the Kyocera http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B000KKLZ68/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_2?pf_rd_p=479289247&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B00FJVK5ZA&pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_r=0X5MGBBQ1VJEBN1DR79R

 

Looking at the reviews of the Kyocera apparently these are a little rough at first then wear smooth.  Seems all right though initially they may rough up any fine polish you put on the edge, but not a worry probably unless your stones are finer than 3K JIS.

 

 

Rick

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Ok because i got the grunwerg steel as a present. And yes use 6k as last stone.
post #4 of 15

Great!  Now you can take a few swipes and tell us if it is any rougher than the 6K finish.

 

The reason I like my fine Arkansas stone as a steel (I rounded one edge) is that its finish is in the area of 10-12K.

 

 

Rick

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Okey. Will do when im back from vacation :-)
post #6 of 15

Personally am a big fan of Idahone Ceramic Honing Rod.

1200 grit, equivalent to the Japanese range of 3k,

post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Okey anyone got any ideas about how the grunwerg is?
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggyb View Post
 

Personally am a big fan of Idahone Ceramic Honing Rod.

1200 grit, equivalent to the Japanese range of 3k,

 

The Idahone is the recommended one here, but I have never personally used one.  I recall BDL indicating it was superior to a polished packers steel, which would indicate it actually behaved finer in application than 3K.  I have seen sintered rod used in various industrial applications that had a rather smooth/shiny surface as a result of the material and sintering process.  I could be completely wrong here though now that I consider the trustworthiness of my recall, in which case I would owe some an apology for no-it-all assertions.

 

MrB, as to the Grunwerg, you may just have to wait till you get home.  :-(

 

 

Rick

post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hehe okey bro
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

 

The Idahone is the recommended one here, but I have never personally used one.  I recall BDL indicating it was superior to a polished packers steel, which would indicate it actually behaved finer in application than 3K.  I have seen sintered rod used in various industrial applications that had a rather smooth/shiny surface as a result of the material and sintering process.  I could be completely wrong here though now that I consider the trustworthiness of my recall, in which case I would owe some an apology for no-it-all assertions.

 

MrB, as to the Grunwerg, you may just have to wait till you get home.  :-(

 

 

Rick


It's my go to in the kitchen for some quick touch up.
Leaves the perfect amount of tooth if the knife is too sharp for the job.

Though I cheat with other setups I have in the shop for sharpening like a paper wheel or leather, if ion the kitchen and first cut feels a bit dull, a few strokes fixes that right up.

I feel it is a bit above 1200, just a bit, maybe 1500.

Cleanup is a breeze and the key to keeping it performing consistently.

Oh, baby butt smooth out of the gate, no breakin needed.
 

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
The idahone or the grunwerg?
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbushido View Post

The idahone or the grunwerg?


If you mean me the Idahone.

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Okey mate. Really hope the grunwerg is good since it was a gift
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Got home now the grunwerg is actually pretty god i think.
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Polish the edge at 6k stone then the grunwerg steel after at a stepper degre say 20 i think leaves a little bite in the edge perfect :-)
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