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So no steeling western style j knives?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Korin says not to do this on japanese western knives.  I hadn't heard that before.

post #2 of 17

Treat it how it works best for you. That's how they think the knife should be used. That also reflects their sharpening practices. Those are probably not your sharpening practices. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 17
Well, isnt hardness of knife steel vs. Hardness of steel steel an issue as well?
post #4 of 17

That's the general theory, but it's not an absolute. You can correct the bends and nicks with a stropping motion on a somewhat softer steel or stone, just as they formed against softer bits of bone, grit and such. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 17

I use the 10" MAC Ceramic steel on my J knives when just stropping isn't cutting it, or after a serious workout on the board. 

 

I hit on an interesting thing the other day.  My cheap paring knife upstairs was dull and I had a bottle of wine with a frost textured finish on the outside.  I thought Hmmm . . . and stropped it on the glass and it came back sharp - very sharp.  I tried it on one of my other harder blades and same thing - as good or better than my ceramic.

post #6 of 17
I guess you've created a wire edge. It's a very thin burr -- an accumulation of debris -- on top of the edge. Scary sharp -- and very weak. After a few cuts on the board the sharpness is suddenly gone.
post #7 of 17

I can't feel any bur and under magnification it looks good.  Glass is harder than steel and I picked up the angle for the last few strokes.  I gave them a workout and they are holding up.  I don't prescribe this it was something that was pressed into service on a whim.  I've sharpened on the back of a plate before.

post #8 of 17
A wire edge doesn't feel as a common one side burr. Use it on the board and see if the edge holds.
post #9 of 17

It's a cheap stainless paring knife (but the profile is great) it gets used for removing the foil from wine bottles and opening mail.  Holding up pretty good for that.  :lol:

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post

It's a cheap stainless paring knife (but the profile is great) it gets used for removing the foil from wine bottles and opening mail.  Holding up pretty good for that.  lol.gif

That sounds like one very useful knife smile.gif

I actually have a similar one or used in similar fashion.

As to the thread topic I believe the warning from Korin is an attempt to avoid having to deal with knife owners who didn't find good results from using their new j knife on the big olé steel that came with their Wusthof etc.

There is IMHO still a need for caution when using a ceramic rod as well due to the amplified pressures at the point of contact (remember it's a very acute edge hitting a very small area of the cylindrical rod) and the combination of thinness and hardness of the edge of the knife.

No sense having to deal with unhappy customers who screwed up the edge of their new knife etc.

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

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"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

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post #11 of 17
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 


Great info, thanks.  It makes a lot more sense now.  So what would be a good finishing stone for a home chef / j knife noob to have?  I don't have any stones and planned to learn in the near future.  Maybe a Naniwa Super Stone?  What grit is considered a "finishing" stone?

 

 

post #13 of 17
"Good finishing stone for a noob"

The choices are many, and every time I look for info or read reviews etc it seems everyone has their favorites.

I found that there are many good choices in brands etc and am as happy with my Shapton glass as I am the more expensive ones.

I think it really comes down to grit, experience level, the actual knife, and the desired results (meaning some cutting benefits from more polish and others do better with a lot less).

I started with a 2k and 6k, but shortly after added a 1k as the 2k was just to slow, but kept it as it is great for finishing where I don't want as much polish ad the 6k.

Have also seen people recommend 1k or 1k/3k combo for a good first stone.

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

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post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by YEM88 View Post


Great info, thanks.  It makes a lot more sense now.  So what would be a good finishing stone for a home chef / j knife noob to have?  I don't have any stones and planned to learn in the near future.  Maybe a Naniwa Super Stone?  What grit is considered a "finishing" stone?

What steel are you sharpening?
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikael View Post


What steel are you sharpening?


Masamoto VG - gyutou and petty

post #16 of 17
I have used a super stone for vg10 but only a 1k grit stone. Worked alright but the stone's a little soft.
For a finishing stone you'll need something in the 5k range.
A cheaper alternative is a king combination stone. A 1-4k combi stone and an diamond stoneat around 300 grit for flattening and repair work and you'll be set for a long time

Mikael
post #17 of 17
I reread your post. Do you only need a finishing stone?
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