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Thai red curry?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi

I made the recipe below a few weeks ago.  Has anyone got any tips on how to improve it a bit and perhaps make it a bit thicker but without taking the taste away?  I did add a bit of tomato purée but I don't want to add to much to it?

 

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1788/thai-chicken-curry

post #2 of 10

Check the fat content of your coconut milk. The higher the fat content the thicker the milk is - conversely the thicker your curry will be - in my experience. 

 

The chinese use cornstarch to thicken sauces without adding flavor, but you knew that.

 

Opps!! Not supposed to post here.  

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Would cornflour be OK?

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBristol View Post

Would cornflour be OK?

I would avoid cornflour for thickening most things since it can lose it's viscosity reboil and the starch present is not natural in these dishes. I tend to use a whole baking potato (peeled) during reduction of the coconut milk. The potato releases starch that thickens far better than most analogues. With the exception of xythantan or tapioca starch. Remove the half cooked potato during cooking. Don't always rely on the fat content of the coconut milk, as it can make the dish to heavy. Remember thais use sticky starchy rice to thicken their curries. So they should be a bit thinner from the pot. Hope this helps.
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Is it possible it wans't reduced enough and that is why it is so runny? It was on the stove or about 15 minutes but maybe it wasn't enough?

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 

Just realised that cornflour is the British word for cornstarch ha ha

post #7 of 10

If you want it thicker, next time cook extra jasmine rice. After simmering for 15 minutes , strain the liquid off and add some of the rice to the liquid. Simmer for 5 more minutes. Blend and add back into dish. Finish with the fresh coriander and more curry paste if desired.

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post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

One thing I didn't realize is that you are suppose to shake the coconut milk tin first that might be partly why it is so thin.  Also I've heard it recommended to cook the curry sauce in a separate pan let it rude then add it to your vegetables so you don't over cook them.

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBristol View Post
 

One thing I didn't realize is that you are suppose to shake the coconut milk tin first 

 

Rubber spatula?
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEPChef View Post


I would avoid cornflour for thickening most things since it can lose it's viscosity reboil and the starch present is not natural in these dishes. I tend to use a whole baking potato (peeled) during reduction of the coconut milk. The potato releases starch that thickens far better than most analogues. With the exception of xythantan or tapioca starch. Remove the half cooked potato during cooking. Don't always rely on the fat content of the coconut milk, as it can make the dish to heavy. Remember thais use sticky starchy rice to thicken their curries. So they should be a bit thinner from the pot. Hope this helps.

This is excellent advice. Thanks. 

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